Geordie - language, Newcastle upon Tyne

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  • Local hero
    Local hero
    by toonsarah
  • Geordie - language
    by keeweechic
  • teets oot faw thar lads !
    teets oot faw thar lads !
    by sourbugger
  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Speak the language!

    by toonsarah Updated May 1, 2011

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    Local hero

    Perhaps more than any other in the country, the Geordie dialect can seem impenetrable to a non-Geordie, (a Geordie being a native of Newcastle). The differences between this and standard English fall into three main groups:
    - words that are pronounced differently
    - words that are unique to Geordie
    - words that are used differently, i.e. in phrases you won't hear elsewhere in the country.
    Here are some examples of each:

    Pronunciation:
    Many words acquire an extra syllable when spoken by a Geordie. Film becomes "fillum" and soap "so-ip"
    "A"s are always short, as in axe, so the town is never pronounced, as it might be elsewhere in the country, as "Newcarrrrstle"
    "ou", pronounced elsewhere as "ow", here becomes "oo" - thus "shout" sounds like "shoot"

    Different words:
    There are so many of these. For instance:
    yem = home
    gan = go
    So "Ah'm gannin yem" means "I'm going home"
    Canny can mean several things, including quite, nice and shrewd - you'll hear it a lot in phrases like "canny good" (quite good) or "a canny pint" (a tasty beer)
    bairn = child
    wor = our, or occasionally my ("wor lass" = "my wife")
    clarts = mud, and "clarty" therefore = muddy
    Haway = let's go, or come on
    Toon = town, and by transference the town's only football team, Newcastle United
    So anyone saying "Haway the Toon" or "Haway the lads" is cheering on the football players
    Hinny = honey, used a term of endearment used for women and sometimes even for men

    Different phrases:
    Here are a couple that I like:
    Up a height = in a high place (i.e. used of something up on a shelf)
    She suits red = she looks good in red or as we'd say elsewhere in the country, red suits her
    He takes a good photo = he's photogenic, looks good in photos (elsewhere this would mean that he's good at taking photos)
    She belongs London = she comes from London

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    Sid the Sexist, Biffa Bacon, the fat slags & co

    by sourbugger Updated Oct 6, 2004

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    teets oot faw thar lads !

    Viz is an 'adult' comic that still sells about 100,000 copies on each issue, and you can buy a copy at most newsagents in the UK.

    It began about 20 years ago in Newcastle as a few badly photocopied sheets produced from a student bedsit. The humour is definetely on the purile / chilish / disgusting side / schoolboy type / knob gag / toliet humour level - and what's wrong with that ?

    Many of the strips feature characters that are firmly set in Newcastle and speak pure Geordie. Good examples include Biffa Bacon, Sid the Sexist and the Fat Slags.

    Buy a copy before you go, and you just might get a flavour of Geordie humour !

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  • cheekymarieh's Profile Photo

    Accents

    by cheekymarieh Written Sep 7, 2002

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    You will hear many people refering to any northern accent as a Geordie accent. When in Newcastle you will hear a true accent and realise that the people of Sunderland, Middlesbrough and Durham have totally different accents.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Geordie Accent

    by barryg23 Written Feb 24, 2007

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    The winger on our football team in college was from Newcastle and I remember how difficult it was to understand him sometimes as he had a strong Geordie accent. However, when I visited Newcastle I had no trouble with the accent, I guess I’ve got used to UK accents in the last few years. For first time visitors it might be more difficult.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Geordie Accent

    by keeweechic Updated Sep 18, 2002

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    'Geordie' is the regional dialect which is associated with the North East of England, although there are some variations of this within the region. The most widely agreed definition of the Geordie 'homeland' covers the group of towns that lie on either side of the Tyne River and includes Newcastle-upon-Tyne through to Whitley Bay on the north bank, and Gateshead through to South Shields on the south. There are some similarities between 'Geordie' and Scandinavian languages, which have their origins in the times of Viking occupation.
    .

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  • joecooper's Profile Photo

    Geordie - a dialect of...

    by joecooper Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Geordie - a dialect of English, apparently! If you though Cockney was hard to understand, try working out what a Geordie is saying, espcially after 5 pints a broon! Common terms used by even the best-spoken Geordies are 'Way-ay' (OK), 'Ha-way' (Go on), 'Like' (Follows every sentence). You may need some help, so use this links: English-Geordie Translator and Geordie Dictionary

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    The 'Geordie' language!Ever...

    by steventilly Written Aug 24, 2002

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    The 'Geordie' language!

    Ever used AltaVista BabelFish to translate from one language to another? Well now there's an extension to cover the language of Newcastle - 'Geordie'. It can be found here

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    Traditional Geordie Songs

    by steventilly Updated Nov 24, 2002

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    Cushie Butterfield

    She's a big lass
    she's a bonnie lass
    and she like her beer
    and they call her Cushie Butterfield
    and I wish she was here.

    She sits on the quayside
    and sells yellow clay
    and her father is a muckman
    and they call him Tom Grey

    She's a big lass
    she's a bonnie lass
    and she like her beer
    and they call her Cushie Butterfield
    and I wish she was here

    When The Boat Comes In

    Come here, maw little Jacky,
    Now aw've smoked mi backy,
    Let's hev a bit o' cracky,
    Till the boat comes in.

    Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
    Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
    Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
    Thou shall hev a fishy when the boat comes in.

    Here's thy mother humming,
    Like a canny woman;
    Yonder comes thy father,
    Drunk - he cannot stand.

    Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
    Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
    Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
    Thou shall hev a haddock when the boat comes in.

    Our Tommy's always fuddling,
    He's so fond of ale,
    But he's kind to me,
    I hope he'll never fail.

    Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
    Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
    Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
    Thou shall hev a bloater when the boat comes in.

    I like a drop mysel',
    When I can get it sly,
    And thou, my bonny bairn,
    Will lik't as well as I.

    Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
    Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
    Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
    Thou shall hev a mackerel when the boat comes in.

    May we get a drop,
    Oft as we stand in need;
    And weel may the keel row
    That brings the bairns their bread.

    Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
    Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
    Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
    Thou shall hev a salmon when the boat comes in.

    Other fine favourites include The Lambton Worm and The Blaydon Races. If you want to know more follow this link
    www.southshields-sanddancers.co.uk/geosongs.htm

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  • Geordie

    by Grootpiet Updated Apr 4, 2011

    If for the first 10 mins you don't understand a word your taxi driver is saying (and they love to talk), he's probably a Geordie... a strange local dialect of English, heavily influenced by Scandinavian languages and scottish.

    The most enjoyable Geordie saying I heard was '*** oot' (hmm... the T-word seems to auto-edit in VT), normally shouted outside of the clubs by guys and followed by a brief flash if the lady seems fit...

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