Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne

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  • St Mary's Catholic Cathedral
    St Mary's Catholic Cathedral
    by zadunajska8
  • St Mary's Catholic Cathedral
    St Mary's Catholic Cathedral
    by zadunajska8
  • St Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle
    St Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle
    by zadunajska8
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    St Nicholas

    by solopes Updated Apr 26, 2014

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    Newcastle
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    Started in the 11th century, this small cathedral got its final look in the 19th, with most of its elements coming from the 14th and 15th.

    The most remarkable detail is the top of the tower, a lantern tower built in the 15th century and longtime used to help the ships.

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral

    by Britannia2 Written Sep 18, 2012

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    The Cathedral
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    The cathedral is named after St Nicholas, the patron saint of sailors and boats. It was originally a parish church, built in 1091, but this was destroyed in a fire in 1216. It was rebuilt in 1359 and became a cathedral in 1882 when the Diocese of Newcastle was created by Queen Victoria.
    The cathedral is notable for its unusual lantern spire, which was constructed in 1448. For hundreds of years, it was a main navigation point for ships using the River Tyne. At its base the tower measures 36 ft 9 in (11.20 m) by 35 ft (11 m) and it is 196 ft 6 in (59.89 m) from the base to the top of the steeple.
    It was closed on the day I visited due to power supply problems but I will re-visit.

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    St Mary's Catholic Cathedral

    by zadunajska8 Written Mar 18, 2012

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    St Mary's Catholic Cathedral
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    Newcastle's catholic cathedral was built in 1844 for a growing number of Catholics coming to the rapidly expanding industrial city. It was designated as the cathedral church of the catholic diocese of Hexham (later Newcastle & Hexham) just six years later in 1850. It is a quiet and welcoming church with some lovely stained glass windows and is just steps from Newcastle's Central Station.

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    St Nicholas Cathedral

    by zadunajska8 Written Mar 13, 2012

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    St Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle
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    It's the Crown Spire of this cathedral built mainly in the 14th and 15th centuries which is it's most striking feature. This spire has apparently acted to help ship navigation in the past when it would have been the tallest building around in the area. It has an interesting shape like the arches of the crown (presumably giving it the name) and is one of the prominent features of the panorama when looking over to Newcastle from the Gateshead side of the Tyne River.

    Inside it's quite a welcoming place and whilst it's not lavish it does have so interesting treasures to see such as the ornate font, the stained glass windows (mostly 19th century but including a medieval roundel of the Virgin Mary with baby Jesus) and the excellent 15th Century Thornton Brass Memorial.

    There is no admission charge but obviously don't go in during services unless you are wanting to partake of the service rather than just look around. Naturally, donations are gratefully received for the upkeep of the building.

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  • bwk_michael's Profile Photo

    Newcastle Cathedral

    by bwk_michael Written Sep 13, 2007

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    Newcastle Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, North East England. Its full title is The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas Newcastle upon Tyne. It is the seat of the Bishop of Newcastle and is the mother church of the Diocese of Newcastle, the most northerly diocese of the Anglican Church in England, which reaches from the River Tyne as far north as Berwick-upon-Tweed and as far west as Alston in Cumbria.

    Its a very beautiful church, i had just an amazing warm welcome of the locals inside...incl. some free wine he he he he

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    St Nicholas’ Cathedral

    by toonsarah Written Apr 14, 2007

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    St Nicholas��� Cathedral
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    This Anglican cathedral is one of two in the city (the other being the Roman Catholic St Mary’s). It was built in 1359 and became a cathedral in 1882. Its most noticeable feature is its unusual Lantern tower, which was constructed in 1448. For hundreds of years this was a main navigation point for ships using the River Tyne, and it remains one of the most striking landmarks of the city.

    St. Margaret's Chapel contains the only known fragment of medieval stained glass in the cathedral, depicting the Madonna and Child. There are also several interesting memorials, the oldest being a 13th century effigy of an unknown knight, who is thought to have been a member of Edward 1st’s household. This is one of the oldest objects in the cathedral. Another memorial honours Admiral Lord Collingwood, a hero of the Battle of Trafalgar who was baptised and married in the cathedral, and whose statue now looks out to sea from Tynemouth.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by barryg23 Written Feb 25, 2007

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    Newcastle Cathedral
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    Newcastle’s Cathedral is a haven of solitude amidst a busy city. It’s on St. Nicholas street, near the castle and is open to visitors daily. We visited late on a Monday afternoon, just before we caught our train to London and we had the place to ourselves. There's not too much to see inside but it's a quite, sombre place nonetheless. It dates from the 14th century and its most impressive feature is the tall tower, which can be seen from many points in the city.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    St Nicholas Cathedral

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    St Nicholas Cathedral is a prominent sight of the Newcastle skyline with its lantern styled tower which was added in 1470. Previous churches have existed on this site since the Norman times.

    The original church building was damaged by fire in 1248. Much of the church today dates from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. St Nicholas Cathedral was originally part of the Diocese of Durham, it became a Cathedral in 1882.

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  • stevezero's Profile Photo

    St Nicholas Cathedral

    by stevezero Written Mar 19, 2006

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    St Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle
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    An important religious building in the city is the Church of St Nicholas. The church has a 65m high crown spire, dating from 1470. The Church of St Nicholas, then became St Nicholas Cathedral in 1882 after the formation of the diocese of Newcastle.

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    St. Mary's Roman Catholic Cathedral

    by stevezero Written Mar 2, 2006

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    St. Mary's Cathedral, Newcastle
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    St Mary's Cathedral is the mother-church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Hexham & Newcastle. Built between 1842 and 1844, St Mary's was the architectural vision of Augustus Welby Pugin, famous for his major contribution to the neo-Gothic decoration of the Houses of Parliament and numerous churches and cathedrals around the country.

    Opening Times
    Monday - Friday
    7.30am to 6.00pm
    Saturday
    9.00am to 7.30pm
    Sunday
    7.30am to 7.30pm

    Admission Free

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    Visit St Nicholas Cathedral.

    by margaretvn Written Aug 24, 2002

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    This is one of the smallest cathedrals in Britain. Inside there are the remains of an 11thcentury church on which todays 14th and 15th century building is founded. The cathedrals most striking feature is the ornate “lantern tower” which is half tower and half spire. It was first built in 1448 and rebuilt in 1608.

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  • St. Nicholas Cathedral

    by sabsi Written May 4, 2003

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    St. Nicholas Cathedral

    The top of Newcastle's cathedral looks like a crown. Apart from that there's a funny clock which looks like it shouldn't really belong here.

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