Tyne Bridges, Newcastle upon Tyne

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  • Gateshead Millenium Bridge
    Gateshead Millenium Bridge
    by zadunajska8
  • The Tyne Bridge
    The Tyne Bridge
    by zadunajska8
  • Tyne Bridge
    Tyne Bridge
    by Britannia2
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    The Tyne Bridge

    by Britannia2 Written Sep 18, 2012

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    Tyne Bridge

    The Tyne Bridge was designed by Mott, Hay and Anderson who based their design on the Hell Gate Bridge in New York (which was completed in 1916). The bridge was completed on 25 February 1928 and opened on 10 October by King George V and Queen Mary, who were the first to use the roadway travelling in their Ascot landau.
    The bridge was originally painted green with special paint made by J. Dampney Co. of Gateshead. The same colours were used to paint the bridge in 2000. The bridge spans 531 feet (162 m) and the road deck is 84 feet (26 m) above the river level.
    It originally carried the A1 in to Newcastle but when the Tyne Tunnel opened in 1967 the A1 was diverted away from the bridge.

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    Gateshead Millenium Bridge

    by zadunajska8 Written Mar 18, 2012

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    Gateshead Millenium Bridge
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    NewcastleGateshead's Millenium Bridge was built following a competition run by the local council in 1996 to choose a new cycle and footbridge that would link Newcastle and Gateshead across the Tyne whilst still complimenting the existing famous bridges across the river. This was the winning design, the world's first tilting bridge.

    When ships need to pass the bridge opens like an eye winking as the walk/cycle platform tilts upwards to the arch above. Quite a design.

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  • The Millennium Bridge

    by jayhawk2000 Updated Sep 5, 2005

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    Lifting for the last tall ship

    It's called the 'blinking eye' bridge because...

    1) It has two 'eyelids': an arch and a walkway;
    2) It 'winks' up and down, lifting itself out of the way as vessels pass through the river channel;
    3) It rises and falls quickly, 'in the blink of an eye'!

    Sound intrigued? The Royal Institute of British Architects thought so too and awarded it the Stirling Prize of 2002 as building of the year. It really is a unique structure, graceful to look at and astonishing to see in motion. It's a world first and another showpiece for the River Tyne gorge with its famous collection of bridges!

    It allows cyclists and pedestrians to cross between Newcastle's quayside and Gateshead's Baltic and Sage.

    We were here in summer 2005 when the last tall ship sailed through and the bridge blinked shut behind it. I don't think it opens that often and it may be worth asking the local TIC or checking the website to see when you can expect a demonstration.

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    Bridge(s) over the River Tyne

    by MDH Written Aug 18, 2003

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    The Tyne Bridge is a great thing to see. It's huge

    The number of bridges (all six of them unique from the other) crossing across the Tyne, connecting Newcastle with its southern portion that proceeds down to Gateshead, is a truly remarkable site.

    The bridge that truly steals the show is the large green Tyne Bridge, which opened in 1928 by King George V. If for any reason you think the bridge looks familiar, it is: the bridge was built in the same style as the Sydney Harbour Bridge, which incidently was built around the same time. Its sheer size and grandness makes it a very cool thing to see.

    Nearby is the High Level Bridge. Although it doesn't look like much to us today, it has a very important past. Opened in 1849, this bridge was the first in the world that was both a road and railroad bridge.

    The newest addition to the lot is the Millennium Bridge, built in the early 2000s, and looks like something straight from a Dr. Seuss book, making it a very unique sight as well as a interesting walk across. How many times do you get to cross a bridge where everything seems to bend?

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  • Swing Bridge

    by sabsi Updated May 3, 2003

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    Swing Bridge and its friends

    Swing Bridge got its name because it swings. Amazing name eh? When a ship wants to pass the whole bridge move around its central point.

    Swing Bridge is the 2nd bridge from the front on this picture (The low one).

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  • Just take a walk around the...

    by Richard2784 Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Just take a walk around the city. There are some magnificent buildings and galleries. A walk along the quayside by the river is a must. The bridges are superb with some great views. They are in the process of building a new one which will link with the new arts centre that is being built. Here are some pictures from the River Tyne.

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    The Swing Bridge

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    The Swing Bridge swivels about its central axis on large roller-bearings. All operated by hydraulic pressure. The very first swing bring over the Tyne was made of stone and wood in 120AD. The second and third were built of stone in 1320 and1731 respectively. This 4th edition was built in 1876. The bridge connects Newcastle to Gateshead.

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    Millennium Bridge

    by barryg23 Written Feb 23, 2007

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    Millennium Bridge from the Castle
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    Named for the new Millennium but not opened until late 2001, the Millennium bridge is an eye-catching piece of architecture on the River Tyne. Many cities have designed Millennium bridges but the Newcastle/Gateshead one is exceptional. It lies just beside the Baltic Gallery east of the Tyne bridge and it can rotate 90 degrees to allow ships to pass below. Unfortunately we didn't get to see this during our trip but it must be a spectacular sight. The bridge is a nice addition to the six other bridges spanning the Tyne.

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    Tyne Bridge

    by barryg23 Written Feb 25, 2007

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    Tyne Bridge from the Castle
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    The Tyne Bridge was constructed in 1928 and is probably the best known of the 7 bridges crossing the Tyne. It’s design was influenced by the Sydney Harbour Bridge and its dimensions are impressive: it has a total length of 389 metres and it stands 59 metres above water level at its highest point. It crosses the Tyne near the castle in, in one of the oldest parts of the city.

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    Tyne Bridge

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    Tyne Bridge was built between 1925 and 1928 and has become an icon of Tyneside. Opened by King George V, it is the most recent of the three great bridges. The bridge is almost half a mile long and at the time of its construction was the world’s largest single span bridge. It was later followed a few years later by the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932.

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    The Quayside

    by mikeEOS Written Aug 26, 2002

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    For centuries the Quayside has been the focus of activity in Newcastle. There is a steep drop from the main part of the city down to the river side. This creates a dramatic locations for restaurants, bars etc. There is a market every Sunday morning on the river bank below the Tyne Bridge.

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    Bridges over the River Tyne

    by mikeEOS Written Aug 26, 2002

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    A prominent feature of Newcastle is the bridges across the river – a total of 7
    A new bridge appeared over the Tyne during 2001. This is the Millennium Bridge which is a foot bridge and it has been enthusiastically adopted by the people of Tyneside.
    Moving inland, high above the Tyne, is the enormous arch of the Tyne Bridge, similar to the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Built early in the 20th Century it became a landmark for the city.
    Next is the Swing Bridge. Almost at river level, it is an engineering marvel built during the 19th century. It is notable because, by the use of hydraulic engines invented in Newcastle, the roadway can be swung round so that ships can pass up and down the river.
    Another high bridge is the High Level Bridge. Built by George Stephenson in the 19th century it has a lower floor carrying vehicular traffic and an upper level carrying railtracks.
    There is then a series of 3 more utilitarian bridges carrying railway, road and underground railway traffic.

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    The Tyne Bridge

    by Fen Updated Nov 2, 2003

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    The Tyne Bridge

    The Tyne Bridge was opened on 10 October 1928 by HM King George V and Queen Mary.

    It cost £700,000 to build.

    The towers at each end were intended to be used as warehouses but the floors were never completed.

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    Gateshead Millennium Bridge

    by joecooper Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Gateshead Millennium Bridge
    This is far superior to it's better know London counterpart. When a ship needs to pass which is too tall, the bridge closes up lik an eye. It's great!

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    Bridge

    by solopes Updated Feb 20, 2014
    Newcastle
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    Built in 1926, thsi bridge was, at that time, with its 389 meters long, the longhest sigle span bridge (162 meters). It is not anymore, it is only the tenth higher structure in town, but it became a symbol of Tyneside, and a highlight in a city where there is not much to see.

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