Train travel, Newcastle upon Tyne

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Getting to Newcastle

    by toonsarah Updated Mar 4, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Although it is one of England’s most northerly cities, high speed trains mean that you can get to Newcastle in less than three hours from central London. Trains leave from Kings Cross (two an hour for most of the day) and follow a mostly scenic route, the highlight (for me at least) is the stunning view of Durham Cathedral just 15 minutes before arriving at Newcastle’s Central Station. From that station you are just a short walk from many of the city’s main attractions (including St James’ Park), or you can jump straight on the Metro to travel to more outlying areas.

    If you plan to travel by train, I recommend the Trainline for ticket purchases as prices can be a lot cheaper than buying at the station, especially if you plan ahead. A full price flexible return ticket can be as much as £266 (and yes, that’s second class!) but I recently paid only £19 for a single by planning ahead and choosing a less popular travel time. A good average would be around £100 return if you want flexibility or about £60-£80 if you can commit to specific trains.

    Alternatives to the train include driving (it’s about 300 miles on good fast motorways); Coach (the most economical and slowest option – check out National Express for details and prices); or air (Newcastle has a good international airport, with access by Metro to the city centre in about 30 minutes).

    Intercity train pulls into Newcastle Central

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    London to Newcastle by train

    by barryg23 Written Feb 21, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We travelled to Newcastle by train from London. As we had booked well in advance we got a great deal on tickets - it cost 25 pounds in all for the journey up and back. Interestingly, you can only get this price if you book two single tickets for each part of the journey - there is no return ticket for 25 pounds.

    Newcastle train is on the fast London-Edinburgh line and the journey took just over 3 hours. We arrived exactly on time in both directions. As you get close to Newcastle there are a few sights worth looking out for. First, you get a fine view of Durham city and cathedral from Durham station. Then, about 5 minutes outside of Durham you can see the Angel of the North. Finally, as you cross the Tyne into Newcastle there is a nice view of Newcastle, Gateshead and the bridges across the river.

    Newcastle Train Station Angel of the North Bridges over the Tyne

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    Shopping centre with a rail station

    by sourbugger Updated Sep 14, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Metrocentre is one of the largest shopping centres in Europe (see seperate tip) and is very well connected by literally hundreds of bus services.

    If you are forced to visit this place (in my case by a shopping-mad wife) then you can at least let the train take the strain from Central station.

    There are at least 3 services an hour, including a dedicated service (ie the Metrocentre is it's destinatation) that trundles to the metrocentre every hour.

    As a bonus, look out on the way through the innner suburbs for rows of pidgeon lofts. Racing them still a big sport around these parts.

    Metrocentre gateshead

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    Newcastle Central Station

    by Galahad Updated Mar 8, 2005

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    The Central Station was designed by John Dobson in 1846. In November 2000 I discovered this photo in the Severn Valley Railway Museum archive. It is of the old signal gantry at Newcastle Central Station but is without a date.

    Railway Signal Gantry, Newcastle Station
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    North East Rover

    by Britannia2 Updated May 20, 2014

    This ticket offers 197 miles of east coast mainline travel from Retford to Berwick on Tweed - bounded by Newcastle - Carlisle - Settle - Bradford - Halifax - Huddersfield - Sheffield - Retford - Cleethorpes - and the North Sea Coast plus Newcastle to Berwick. Not valid on Hull Trains or Great Central trains. From 08.45 and Harrogate now included .
    Any 4 days in 8 - is £92.00, with a railcard £60.75 and children £46.00. Any 7 days - £106.00, with a railcard £69.95 and children £53.00.
    2014 prices.

    Train at Newcastle
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    Hadrians Wall Country Line Day Ranger

    by Britannia2 Updated May 20, 2014

    This rail ticket covers the area from Sunderland to Whitehaven and this of course includes Newcastle., From 08.45 and prices for 2014 are 1 days unlimited travel £20, with a railcard £13.20 and children £10.00. 20% reduction on the 2013 price!

    Northern Rail train
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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Tyne and Tees Day Ranger

    by Britannia2 Updated May 20, 2014

    This day ticket gives unlimited travel in an area bounded by Hexham / Morpeth - Saltburn/Whitby via Sunderland or Darlington plus Eaglescliffe - Northallerton - Bishop Auckland. Not valid on Grand Central trains and can only be used from 08.45.
    2014 prices are £21, with a railcard £13.85 and children £10.50.
    Excellent value.

    Northern Rail train
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    North East Round Robin

    by Britannia2 Updated May 20, 2014

    This rover ticket gives unlimited travel in a area bounded by Carlisle - Newcastle - York - Garforth - Leeds - plus York - Harrogate - Leeds. From 08.45 and cannot be used on Grand Central trains.
    2014 cost is £46, with a railcard £30.35 and children £23.00.

    Local train crosses the Tyne
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    North Country Rover

    by Britannia2 Updated May 20, 2014

    This rail ticket gives unlimited travel in an area covered by Carlisle - Newcastle - Hull - Selby - Leeds - Halifax - Preston - Morecambe and the Irish and North Sea coasts. Not valid on Hull Trains or Grand Central trains and from 08.45 but available anytime between Carlisle and Barrow in Furness.
    2014 prices are any 4 days in 8 - £88, with a railcard £58.10 and children £44.

    Local train in the north east.
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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    convenient

    by iaint Written Jan 14, 2015

    On my 4 visits to the city I've driven twice and taken the train twice. From my part of Scotland (Fife) the train is faster and more comfortable.
    However, depending on ticket prices it is likely to be more expensive - almost certainly so if more than one person is traveling.
    The main city station is right in the city centre, so perfectly located if traveling for a meeting downtown.
    It has a lounge for 1st class passengers, which is great for getting out of the January cold to wait for the train - as I did on my most recent trip.

    main entrance 1st class lounge
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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Great!

    by iaint Written Jan 14, 2015

    On my most recent trip to the city I took the train. Cross Country Trains on the outward trip. East Coast on the way home.

    Very different, but both comfortable, fast, and on time. I was in 1st class both ways - a good deal on the price by booking 5 weeks in advance and using my Senior Railcard. It was £70 return from Edinburgh. It was a business trip, so allowable against tax as well.

    The early morning outward train was almost empty in 1st class. A train from Dundee to Plymouth.

    The late afternoon return was full. A London to Edinburgh service.

    Newcastle Station has a 1st class lounge - ideal for waiting on a cold January day.

    quiet... Dawn. E Lothian. 200 kph. lounge
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  • jrs1234's Profile Photo

    Central Station

    by jrs1234 Written Jul 11, 2006

    Train is a great way of getting to Newcastle - there are fast trains from London Kings Cross and Edinburgh, plus a direct service across from Carlisle. My own trip in was much more modest - by train from the MetroCentre mall in Gateshead. You arrive in the impressive Newcastle Central Station, a great piece of Victorian archictecture, opened in 1850.

    Connections are good, as there's a Metro station linked to the station, or you can just walk out straight into the city - the whole of the city centre is within walking distance.

    It's not really a place to hang around in winter, though - each end of the station is wide open to the elements and the wind can really whistle through. There are a few enclosed waiting rooms these days, which makes hanging around a bit more bearable than sitting next to the platform than it used to be....

    Inside Newcastle Central Station Front of Newcastle Central Station
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