Whatcote Travel Guide

  • ST.Peter's Church,Whatcote.
    ST.Peter's Church,Whatcote.
    by Tdiver
  • The Royal Oak,Whatcote.
    The Royal Oak,Whatcote.
    by Tdiver
  • Mystery doorway,ST.Peter's,Whatcote.
    Mystery doorway,ST.Peter's,Whatcote.
    by Tdiver

Whatcote Things to Do

  • Tdiver's Profile Photo

    by Tdiver Updated Jul 9, 2006

    A walk around the allotments of Whatcote,distance 2.5 miles,takes max 1.5 hrs.
    So called as part of it follows the path trodden by the villagers going to work on their allotments many years ago.Re-opened in 1994 thanks to Tom Smith and his footpath volunteers,on August 21st and a picnic was held after and hopefully now a yearly event.
    Start in churchyard at the kissing gate behind the tower.Turn right and follow markers to the bridge over Wynyates Brook.Turn left to top of rise turn right then left over a small bridge,through a hedge and over a stile.Turn right and descend to Bert's Barn and out to road.Turn left towards Shipston,pass road signed Idlicote and take bridal path a few yards further,turning left,upto to the Viewpoint.Keep hedge on your right towards Hell Brake(held=wood,brake=slope).As you reach the wood go left down through a hedge and turn right into Brake Meadow,left and across fields to re-cross Wynyates Brook.Go through gate on your right small pond(old village reservoir)Nearby stones suggest buildings were present sometime in the past.A bit further and you're back in the churchyard.
    Map available from the church.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • Tdiver's Profile Photo
    Preaching cross,ST.Peter's,Whatcote. 4 more images

    by Tdiver Written Jul 9, 2006

    As there is mention of a priest in the Domesday Book then there must have already been a church on the site when construction of the present church began around 1150.
    Additions were made following this until in 1767 major repairs were carried out and More work was carried out in 1840 but when in 1940 a German bomb caused extensive damage to the porch,nave roof and tower it had to wait until 1947 for restoration could be done.
    The Church is entered through the 14th century porch but the door arch inside is Norman.
    The tub Font is thought to be Saxon(hence an earlier church on the site)and was also damaged during the bombing.
    The nave and the first part of the church are the oldest possibly using stone from the previous one.The blocked up doorway and 2 windows either side of it are 12th century.
    In the south wall the low down window near the pulpit is probably 13th century,the highest 12th although rebuilt and the 3rd window is 14th.
    The doorway into the tower is 13th as is the lower part of the tower but scratched into the door jamb is some 18th century graffiti,no doubt done by workmen carrying out repairs in 1767.
    The small boarded up doorways' purpose is in doubt but some early photographs show a ceiling to the nave so this could have given access to the roof space.
    Opposite the tower is the arch leading to the chancel,added in the 13th.To the left is a blocked up doorway,accessing a staircase inside the wall up to a gallery running across the top of the chancel arch and possibly the roofspace and living quarters for the priest in earlier times.
    The 3 pointed east window over the altar is 13th but photos show another so this has been altered or another put in instead.
    Church registers are almost complete from 1573(Elizabeth I) and housed at Warwickshire County Records Office.
    The upper part of the tower dates from the 15th and interestingly the windows on each side are all different.
    Outside opposite the priests doorway is a medieval preaching cross with weathered sundial on top.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Whatcote Hotels

    0 Hotels in Whatcote

Whatcote Restaurants

  • Tdiver's Profile Photo
    The Royal Oak,Whatcote.

    by Tdiver Written Jul 9, 2006

    Built in 1168 as an ale house for workers building churches in the area.Inside the chimney there are iron rungs leading upto a hideaway to the right.
    In 1642 Cromwell and his officers used the house as temporary quarters before the battle of Edgehill and had the bread oven removed and a slit made in the wall to look out over Edgehill.They returned here after as well to slake their thirst and fill their bellies.
    Snacks available.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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