Wolverhampton Things to Do

  • Bratch Locks Toll House
    Bratch Locks Toll House
    by Andrew_W_K
  • Flower Garden showing the Clock Tower
    Flower Garden showing the Clock Tower
    by Jannice48
  • Things to Do
    by leics

Most Recent Things to Do in Wolverhampton

  • leics's Profile Photo

    St Peter's Collegiate Church

    by leics Written Feb 22, 2015

    St Peters' was certainly founded in Anglo-Saxon times, though it is not certain whether we owe that foundation (and the town itself) to Wulfhere in the 600s or Lady Wulfun in the 900s.

    The church started out as St Mary's, only changing its dedication to St Peter's in the mid-1100s.

    The red sandstone building which exists today is, like many English churches, rather a mish-mash of architectural styles from the various stages of its development. The oldest parts still visible are the cross-arches underneath the central tower, which dates from the 1200s. The church was enlarged in the 1300s and changed again in the 1500 and 1600s.

    It's worth having a closer look at the carved stone pulpit from 1450, with a lion at its base to protect the minister and a stone staircase which encircles the pillar next to the pulpit. the pulpit and staircase are incredibly well-preserved and unique in England for that preservation.

    Also worth a closer look is the wooden gallery built in 1610 specially for the boys of what was then Wolverhampton Boys Free School and is now Wolverhampton Grammar School.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Albert on his horse.....

    by leics Written Feb 22, 2015

    This statue, like so many similar Victorian statues of the Royal Family, was paid for by public subscription.

    It was erected in what was then known as High Green in 1866 and was actually unveiled by Queen Victoria in what may well have been her first public engagement after Albert's death in 1861.

    It was sculpted by one E. Thorneycroft, to whom Queen Victoria lent a uniform and Prince Albert's favourite horse ('Nimrod') and itr seems that she was pleased with the likeness.

    The sculpture has been moved around Queen Square quite a bit over the years, as the square has been re-modelled to cope with changing traffic requirements and fashions in town planning. When I lived in Wolverhampton Prince Albert had the public toilets right under his nose but now they are gone and he is more-or-less in his original position, albeit with a small and rather silly 'water feature' in the pedestrianised area behind his horse's hindquarters.

    The sculpture is a bit of an icon, often used on Wolverhampton's promotional 'fluff'.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Two very old things

    by leics Written Feb 22, 2015

    Also in St Peter's Gardens (a pleasant spot to sit with a sandwich) you'll find two ancient oddities.

    The wonderful, carved pillar is Anglo-Saxon and is still standing in its original position. Well, sort of its original position: the pillar itself probably comes from the Roman city of Wroxeter, about 25 miles away. The Anglo-Saxons re-used and carved it for its purpose as a cross-shaft. It's been in place since the late 900s and the cross it once bore has long disappeared. The seven levels of carving are well-worn by time and weather but you can still see animals, acanthus leaves and decorative lattice-work.

    The 'bargain stone' stands within the railings around the church itself. It got its name from the practice of shaking hands through the hole to seal a bargain but it isn't in its original position. the stone was moved to the church area from Queen Square nearby, where market bargains were made. The origins of the stone are not know. It could be part of the drainage system of St Peter's church, or the earlier church which preceded it on the site: its curved bowl-shape suggests that might be the case. Or it could originally have been a prehistoric standing stone, one of thousands dotted around England and the UK, or a prehistoric boundary-marker. My own feeling is that the stone is not the right shape or size for either standing stone or boundary marker and the hole itself too smoothly-shaped to be natural.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    The oldest place and a brave young man.

    by leics Written Feb 22, 2015

    You can't actually see anything of the oldest place in Wolverhampton. It lies beneath the soil of St Peter's Gardens and St Peter's church, a sandy ridge with good views over the surrounding countryside.

    It is pretty-much accepted that the Anglo-Saxon Lady Wulfrun founded the town in 985AD/CE, although it is equally likely that a settlement existed on the spot long before that time.

    The brave young man? He was Douglas Morris Harris, a Naval radio operator. in May 1917, during the First World War, he refused to leave his post as his ship, HMD Flandi, came under attack, continuing to send messages until it finally sank. He was 19. His bravery was recognised by a memorial in St Peter's Gardens.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Town centre architecture

    by leics Written Feb 22, 2015

    Although there is much 1960s and 70s 'brutalism' in the 'city' centre there are also a few buildings of interest:

    1. Beatties department store largely dates from 1929 and is a good example of the architecture design of the time. This was Beatties 'flagship' store. The small chain, which ended up with 5 department stores across this part of the Midlands, began in Wolverhampton in 1877, though two previous versions of the building were destroyed by fire. Beatties has recently been bought out by House of Fraser.

    2. The black and white building now housing the Yorkshire Building Society was for many years one of the iconic Lyons Corner Houses, known for their smartly-dressed waitresses ('nippies') and their toasted teacakes. It's not an ancient building. The Victorians were very fond of black-and-white timber framing and built many such buildings.

    3. There is a row of well-restored, large early Victorian (1800s) brick terraces on pedestrianised King Street, which leads off also-pedestrianised Dudley Street.

    4. There is a good example of an early-Victorian factory building, waiting renovation and re-use, at the corner of Salop street and School Street.

    1 2 3 4
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    The 'Lindy Lou' building

    by leics Written Feb 22, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is one of the very few pre-1800 structures which remain visible in Wolverhampton's centre. The building originally dates from the very late 1500s/early 1600s though it has obviously undergone many changes and restorations since that time.

    The wooden sign on the front which dates it to the 1300s is not accurate and there is no explanation as to why it is there apart from it possibly being a piece oif deliberate Victorian misinformation.

    It's called the 'Lindy Lou' building by some locals because that was the name of the babywear & toyshop which had the premises for many years. When I lived in Wolverhamptoon it was a cafe, the 'copper Kettle'.

    Until restored in the 1980s the building was black-and-white, with the timberframe black. But that was just Victorian fashion. They decided that all timber-framed buildings looked best in black and white. The original colours of all ancient timber-frame buildngs are those shown in the photo. Nowadays, ancient timber-framed buildings are always restored to their original colours when they undergo external restoration.

    As well as being a toyshop and a cafe, the building has been a pub, a baker's, a benefits advice agency, an employment agency.......and now sells secondhand books and 'collectables'.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Andrew_W_K's Profile Photo

    Moseley Old Hall

    by Andrew_W_K Written Apr 12, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    About 4 miles north of the city is the Elizabethan farmhouse of Moseley now a National Trust property. King Charles II is said to have hidden here after the battle of Worcester in 1651 during the English Civil War. The house is open at weekends and limited days during the week. During the winter the house is open on Sundays only.

    Moseley Old Hall Moseley Old Hall
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Andrew_W_K's Profile Photo

    Bratch Locks

    by Andrew_W_K Written Apr 12, 2010

    About 6 miles west of the city in the village of Wombourne are the Bratch Locks. An impressive set of three locks on the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal complete with toll house that was opened in 1772. It's a popular spot with walkers, fishermen and familys at weekends.

    Bratch Locks Toll House Bratch Locks

    Was this review helpful?

  • bonio's Profile Photo

    Civic Centre

    by bonio Written Nov 7, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As I said earlier the purpose of our trip was to see a New Order gig here. It's an excellent place to watch live music, there's plenty of standing room and just a small balcony with seats, I'll stand every time, not so many places allow it now though - why is that?

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jannice48's Profile Photo

    Wolverhampton City Show

    by Jannice48 Written Jul 9, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Wolverhampton City Show which is held once a year in the West Park is now one of the most popular summertime events in the Midlands. It was my first visit to the Park since I was a little girl even though I don't live too far away, so it was a very nostalgic and enjoyable day out for me. The main acts of the day were Monster Trucks, Gerard Naprouse & the Devils Horsemen Stunt Team, The Royal Artillery Display Troop, James Dylans Stunt Team all of who put on a fantastic show. For those not interested in the acts in the main arena you could browse around the many Marquees, including the Annual Flower and vegetable show, the West Midlands Fuchsia Society, The national Farmers Union Marquee, where you could see the baby farm animals, dog show. Billy Kinghorn a sheap shearing legend presented 3 shows, which I found fascinating to watch. The weekend ends with display from the Black Knights (Parachute Display Team). All in all a fun day out

    Monster Trucks Billy Kinghorn Sheep Shearing

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jannice48's Profile Photo

    West Park Wolverhampton

    by Jannice48 Updated Jul 9, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The West park in Wolverhampton has been named as one of the best in the country in the first ever guide to the United Kingdoms most impressive green spaces and the Royal Horticultural Society Good Parks Guide states it is on the finest Victorian parks in England. The book is full of information giving opening times, how to get there, facilities etc. It also highlights some of the parks best features including the bandstand, clock tower, conservatory where you can see a collection of plants from all over the world and all of which are listed buildings. When I was a young girl I used to spend a lot of time in the park with my parents and brothers and sister, taking a boat out on the Lake where you can see a collection of waterfowl. fishing etc and used to enjoy many a picnic on a sunday afternoon, listening to the music coming from the bandstand. The Park is also used for venues such as the City Show, Bonfire nights and musical events centred around the bandstand

    Flower Garden showing the Clock Tower The Conservatory The Bandstand The Boating Lake Lake with Statue of Charles Pelham in distance
    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jannice48's Profile Photo

    Royal Air Force Cosford Air Show 2006

    by Jannice48 Updated Jun 19, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cosford Air show is an event that happens every June and is well worth the visit if you are interested. It is known to be one of the most popular and successful events in the British aviation calendar. There is lots going on during the day and something for everyone to enjoy, with displays from the Royal Navy and Army Air Corps, together with the overseas visitors and civilian display teams. There is also a wide range of activities that take place in and around the main hangars. This year they celebrated the 70th anniversary of the inaugural flight of the Spitfire and everything it represents. The aircraft symbolises the bravery, tenacity and sacrifice of everyone who lived through second world war and especially the Battle of Britain. Not only did the British Memorial Flight provide a flying display they were also on the ground giving people the opportunity to have a chat with the aircrew who fly not only the spitfire but also the Hurricane and Lancaster Bomber. The programme started off with Model aircraft display and the RAF Falcons Parachute Display Team. We then had flying displays from Tornado GR4, , Hawk, Sea King, Hercules, Black Cats, Chinook, the Battle of Britain flight Lancaster, Spitfire and Hurricane to name a few. The show ended in style with a fantastic display from the Red Arrows

    Lynx and two Gazelle Helicopters Red Arrows Red Arrows The Chinook HC2
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • acepups's Profile Photo

    black country museum

    by acepups Written Sep 24, 2004

    Gives visiters an idea about how people in the black country lived in the past. As you walk round you go into a house and it is like going into someones home. There is someone there baking or cleaning or just having a drink. As soon as you step into the museum you step back in time.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Disabilities
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Wolverhampton

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

25 travelers online now

Comments

Wolverhampton Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Wolverhampton things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Wolverhampton sightseeing.

View all Wolverhampton hotels