Halifax Things to Do

  • Victorian 'prestige' city architecture
    Victorian 'prestige' city architecture
    by leics
  • Things to Do
    by yvgr
  • Things to Do
    by yvgr

Best Rated Things to Do in Halifax

  • Scarecrow_Festival's Profile Photo

    Norland Scarecrow Festival

    by Scarecrow_Festival Written Apr 2, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I don't know the history of this festival at the moment.
    I know that every year that it has been done, there is a theme.
    Maps are supplied to follow the trail (£1) and the idea is to go round by foot or car and spot as many as possible.
    It took us about a hour to do in the car so unless you are very fit and fond of long walks I would use the car the first time you come to see this.

    Crocodile Dundee The lion from the Wizard of Oz
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • rosata's Profile Photo

    Triangle Cricket Club

    by rosata Written Sep 3, 2013

    I visited the Cricket Club on the last day of the Sowerby Bridge Rushbearing Festival as part of an organised VT meeting to await the arrival of the rush cart at the end of its route.

    We had a lovely afternoon tea and spent a pleasant afternoon watching the festivities at Grassy Bottom.

    It was very well organised and parking was available at the far end of the cricket pitch.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Halifax Minster

    by leics Updated Sep 9, 2010

    This is a place worth exploring.

    The minster dates from the late 15th century (1400s) and the four gargoyles you can see next to the entrance have been looking out over the town ever since (light was wrong for me to take photos, sadly).

    It's been much extended since, of course, but if you look carefully you can see where the original building was.

    There was church on the site well before the 1400s. Inside the porch you can see some very early grave covers, one of which (with shears) dates from 1150. There's also a wonderful wooden painted ceiling from (I think) late Medieval times.

    The area outside the minster is paved with old gravestones.take some time to read these, for they tell you much about what life was like in Halifax in past centuries.

    I did not have time to explore the minster as I would have liked: VT meets are very full! But I did manage a quick look around inside, and hope to explore more on a future visit.

    You can hear the minster's bells here

    Minster exterior Painted wooden ceiling. Ancient grave cover Graveslabs Read this one.........
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Have a look at the architecture

    by leics Written Sep 9, 2010

    Halifax is very obviously a mill-town (wool, mainly) which grew massively during the Industrial Revolution (roughly, the 1800s) as people who had lived and worked in the countryside for centuries were forced by economic circumstances to move into the towns.

    Its architecture, apart from the mills and their chimneys,. is very much that of Victorian wealth.......stately civic buildings deliberately create to show the power and prestige of both their owners and the town itself.

    It's worth taking a while to just explore. Remember to look up, because modern shop frontages have often been added to existing (and beautiful) Victorian buildings.

    And when you see the mellow yellow stone covered in black, as you will on some of the walls (most buildings have been cleaned up), remember where the black came from......decades of soot and smoke from the chimneys, not only of the factories but also all the chimneys in people's homes. Think what life must have been like then....

    Victorian 'prestige' city architecture Victorian roofline A typical mill....this time, for flour Central streetscene Typical Victorian ostentation
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Piece Hall, Halifax

    by MartinSelway Updated Apr 4, 2011

    This place is quite unique and a grade 1 listed building. The Piece Hall is one of the most significant and complete Georgian buildings in Britain

    It consists of a large courtyard, surrounded by galleries in the classical style on three levels. As a town square it compares well with any other in Europe and is a monument to both the woollen textile and stone masonry industries

    The Piece Hall was opened on 1st January 1779. It was built as a place for handloom weavers to sell their pieces of cloth, hence the name, and was a replacement for an earlier, smaller, Cloth Hall.

    When restored, the original 300 shops were rationalised into larger retail spaces more suited to modern conditions; when full, the Piece Hall has over 50 small retail shops.

    Among other things, you'll find, antiques, books, crafts, clothing, collectables, cosmetics, food, flowers, gifts, hobbies, jewellery, music and pictures.

    Inside the Piece Hall
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Eureka! Halifax

    by MartinSelway Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Eureka! The Museum for Children is the first and foremost hands-on children's museum in the UK designed especially for 3 - 12 year olds. With more than 400 must-touch exhibits and a full programme of events and activities, you'll be amazed at the fun things you can do!

    My children have been a couple of times and love the place.

    The museum, shop and café are open every day from 10 am - 5pm,
    except 24 - 26 December. Last admission 4pm.

    Adult and child admission £5.95
    Under 3's free
    Saver Ticket (admits 5 people) £27.50
    Groups of 10 or more children £4.25 per head
    School groups from £3.50 per head
    After 3pm Mon - Fri visitors are admitted at half price, during term time only.
    (Excludes pre-booked groups)

    Eureka
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • yvgr's Profile Photo

    Halifax Minster

    by yvgr Written Apr 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Minster in Halifax is strongly connected to the history of the town. It's been standing in the valley for 900 years and is the final resting place for many of Halifax's prominent people.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • yvgr's Profile Photo

    Halifax old railway Station

    by yvgr Written Apr 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Halifax old railway station is no longer operated by the "modern" train station, but the old building still stand there. Today the old station is just another historical building.

    The Halifax Old Railway Station
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    GOLD POST BOX

    by alyf1961 Written Sep 3, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hannah Cockcroft won a Gold medal in the 100 metres at the Paralympics in London. Her Gold post box is outside the Town Hall on Crossley street in Halifax.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Scarecrow_Festival's Profile Photo

    Rushbearing Festival

    by Scarecrow_Festival Written Apr 2, 2008

    A revived tradition of delivering rushes to the local Church’s, to be used as a floor covering.
    Followed by other entertainers, such as Morris Dancers.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Halifax

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

24 travelers online now

Comments

Halifax Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Halifax things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Halifax sightseeing.

View all Halifax hotels