Haworth Things to Do

  • Haworth Station
    Haworth Station
    by Balam
  • Crowded gravestones.....
    Crowded gravestones.....
    by leics
  • The Keighley & Worth Valley Railway
    The Keighley & Worth Valley Railway
    by Balam

Most Recent Things to Do in Haworth

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    Ride on a Steam Train

    by Balam Written Jul 1, 2013
    The Keighley & Worth Valley Railway
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    The Keighley & Worth Valley Railway is a 1950'2 style steam railway.
    It's main locomotive workshops are based in the former goods yard which is just along the road from Haworth station.It cost £10 to go to Keighly and back, a Journey of about 20 to 25 minutes or you can get a all day ticket for only slightly more.
    It was a wonderful experience, I really enjoyed it.

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    1940s weekend

    by Britannia2 Written May 21, 2013
    A very busy Main Street.
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    Each May the village returns to the 1940s when the annual 1940s weekend takes place. Lots of people in 1940s clothing - both civilian and military, the shops and pubs and cafes take on a wartime appearance and Main Street and the park are a mass of people. In the park is a market, dancing and a wartime variety show.
    Usually the third weekend in May.

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  • CluesGo Family Treasure Hunt

    by Boot1e Written Mar 20, 2012

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    Creatures of Haworth
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    There's no treasure but it is an enjoyable way to spend an afternoon and a good way of getting to know your way around Haworth. It's a 2½ mile route starting outside Cobbles and Clay on Main Street which takes you round the popular tourist parts (Main Street, Bronte Parsonage, Keighley Worth Valley Railway) as well as some of the more out of the way bits. On the way there are creatures to look out for which are mainly on buildings, things to collect and questions to answer about things on the route. Points are awarded depending on how difficult the question is.
    It's free to download from www.CluesGo.co.uk/haworth.htm

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    Haworth Church

    by Balam Written Nov 22, 2011

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    St Michael and All Angels church in Haworth is the third building of religious significance to stand on this site, with the first Haworth Chapel dating back to the 14th and 15th Centuries although the present buildings foundation stone was laid on Christmas day in 1879 although the base of the tower dates back to an earlier chapel from 1488.
    In 1820 Patrick Bronte became the parson and moved to the Parsonage with his family and in 1845 Arthur Bell Nicholls arrived in Haworth. He was appointed as a curate and married Charlotte Bronte. Patrick Bronte died in 1861 at the age of 84, having outlived his entire family

    There are estimated to be 42,000 burials in the graveyard

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    Haworth Station

    by Balam Updated Nov 22, 2011

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    Haworth Station
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    Howarth Station is part of The Keighley & Worth Valley Railway, A 1950'2 style steam railway.
    It's main locomotive workshops are based in the former goods yard which is just along the road from the station.

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    The Parsonage Museum

    by Balam Updated Nov 22, 2011

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    The Parsonage Museum
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    The Parsonage was the home of the Bronte Sisters grew up while their father was the Parson at the adjacent church. It was here that they wrote most of their famous novels, It is now a museum owned and maintained by the Bronte Society. We did not go inside as the entry was I thought, quite expensive.

    Entry Fees 2011

    Standard Admission £6.80
    Senior Citizens £5.40
    ES40 holders £4.20
    Students 17 years + £5.20
    Children 5-16 years £3.60 (Children under 5 free)
    Family Ticket £15.00 (admits 2 adults and up to 3 children aged 5 - 16 years)

    Opening Times
    The Museum is open every day from:
    10.00am - 5.30pm April to September
    11.00am - 5.00pm October to March
    except 24-27 December and 2-31 January (museum open New Years Day 12noon to 5.00pm)

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  • Something to not do

    by lizeratsi Written Nov 1, 2011

    Because of the car park clamping scandel that no one warns you about - when you visit this place I would actually avoid the place altogether.

    See the " Bronte Parsonage blog - haworth car park" http://www.blogger.com/comment.do

    You will testimony of hundreds of poor people - disabled people, the elderly - people with small children all sorts all being stung and bullied and intimidated by the thugs who are some how allowed to operate here.

    When we stayed in Haworth our b and b didnt even mention this car park! I saw one or two small vague signs in a few shops but nothing clear and substantial to warn people that these people will rob you.

    they employ people to hand out tickets to you as you arrive - clamp - you took a ticket - they employ people to park badly so you cant park straight - clamp - you parked outside a marked bay!

    they fiddle with the time on the clock to confuse you - so your ticket makes you late - clamp.

    you didnt display your ticket on the glass - you only put it on the dash bord in full view! clamp...

    why the locals dont seem to bther about this rakcet is beyond me as its less money in thier pockets!

    I grew up in cookham village and it was also a tourist village and there is no way the villagers or the buisness would let this g oon, we would have organised a rota of people handing out leafleats and wearing a boards - no not park here! if you booked into a b abd b - they would say - do not park in changegate you will get clamped, large notices everywhere..

    they dont - they let you the visitor fall prey to this nasty practise and its not only the mone y 75 pounds - its the threat and intimidation by them!

    horrendous....does this sound like a place you want to visit?

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    Bronte Parsonage Museum

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 17, 2011

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    Bronte Parsonage Museum

    Was known as the Howarth Parsonage where the Brontes resided there from 1820 to 1861. During their time their Romantic novels were written including Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights where it might suggest that the surrounding countryside gave them inspiration for their novels.

    The musuem celebrates and exhibits the Bronte's life including their writing careers. You can see many of their manuscripts and correspondence displayed there and also the rooms they used during their residence giving an insight of the Bronte's daily lives.

    I paid a visit to the museum in April 2006 where you get to see a number of rooms which had played a vital role of the Brontes' daily lives.

    The musuem houses family activities and a contemporary arts programme. The museum has a shop where one can take a souvenir home.

    It cost 6.50GBP (September 2010) for admission although special rates are available for prepaid groups.

    If anyone is a Bronte Fan you can join them via The Bronte Society and check out the membership benefits.

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    The Keighley and Worth Valley Railway

    by spidermiss Written Sep 18, 2010

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    Train approaching Haworth Station
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    This heritage railway is now privately run since 1964 when Dr Beeching closed the line and the railway received its fame for The Railway Children (1970) where the stations: Oxenhope, Haworth and Oakworth were featured for the famous children's walk in the film.

    Haworth is most popular of all the stations for passengers to alight from for the cobbled Main Street and the Bronte Parsonage Museum. Other stations have it's own unique attractions ranging from the stations themselves to beauty spots for having picnics.

    A variety of tickets including single, returns and rovers are available.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Have a look in the Old Apothecary

    by leics Updated Sep 11, 2010

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    Apothecary exterior
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    Not so much for its goods, although you will find plenty of 'traditional' soaps and so on, but for its interior fittings.

    Strip away the more modern fandangles and fripperies, and you can imagine the apothecary as it was originally (as all English apothecary shops in the 17/1800s and many right up to the 1920s/30s when modern 'chemist' shops first started to appear). They say Branwell Bronte bought his opium here. He may well have done...opium and laudanum were quite commonly used in those days.

    There are tens of brass-labelled wooden drawers and tens of glass jars, wooden counters at either side with glass cases behind them displaying the more expensive goods. Powders could be served (and still are) from huge half-barrels built into the wooden fittings.

    You can buy all sorts of bits and pieces here, for souvenirs and gifts.....soaps, cosmetics, toiletries, dolly-pegs....

    This is one of two shops owned by the same company (the other one is in Leeds).....see the website below.

    You can see the shop cat too, apparently dead but actually asleep. They have put a sign by him because, presumably, visitors kept poking him to see if he was real!

    You can also buy paracetamol (as I discovered) but you will be truly ripped off, paying 1 GBP for a bottle which actually costs around 60p. This is not because they use an old-fashioned 'cash register' which gives prices in old-fashioned pounds shillings and pence. It is because they are making a huge profit in a way of which I am afraid I disapprove.

    I found the member of staff who served me rather abrupt and superior. Perhaps, at the end of the season, she was fed-up with tourists?

    Nevertheless, it is worth going inside just to see how the shop is set out.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Wander the streets a little

    by leics Written Sep 11, 2010

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    Coal-hole
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    For many visitors, Haworth may seem to have just one main street (called 'Main Street'!).

    But, as with all such old English villages, there are many alleyways, narrow lanes and courtyards which will repay and exploration.

    English villages and towns were not built to any sort of grid system (once the Romans had left). They simply grew where there was space. And, in the past, people desired far less space than we do nowadays.

    So you'll find houses tightly crowded together, perhaps with little light entering them. You'll find doors opening straight onto the roadway.....no need for gardens if you have no time to grow things (people in the Industrial Revolution regularly worked 14+ hours per day, 6 days per week).

    The irony is that, nowadays, such old properties are very 'sought-after', very expensive....their quaint appearance is a big plus factor.

    So have a wander round. Spot the 'coal holes' set into walls (coal was the fuel for everyone who could afford it until at least the mid-20th century). They opened so the coalman could deliver straight into the coalcellar.

    You can perhaps imagine the effect of chimneys from every house and factory and building belching out smoke almost all year. Cooking and heating water on a coal-fired 'range' was the norm for many people right up to the 1920s/30s. So at least one fire had to be kept in throughout the whole year. This village would never have been free from smoke, nor were any other English villages, towns or cities.

    It looks very pretty now. But do take your mind back and add the smell of smoke and of sewage, of dirt and of horse manure, see the mud and manure on the streets, the middens (waste-heaps) in the courtyards.......that's what Haworth was like in the 1800s, and before that too.

    The past seems attractive only in hindsight.

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    Buy sweeties

    by leics Written Sep 11, 2010

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    Sweeties..........
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    This shop was closed when we visited, otherwise I'd have been in there like a shot.

    You will find within all the 'traditional' English sweets you might desire....Pontefract cakes, kayli, humbugs, coltsfoot rock, Parma violets, cinder toffee, acid drops, barleysugar......

    Of course, it is not a 'real' sweetshop. It's very unlikely that Haworth of the past could support a specialist shop for luxuries like this....sweets would have been sold in its other shops.

    But sweetshops like this (with the sweeties displayed in jars) certainly did exist in larger communities, and in my 50s/60s childhood. And the sweets themselves are definitely genuine.....so it is well worth having a look.

    Traditional English sweets would make good souvenirs to take home for friends and family too!

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Visit the churchyard

    by leics Updated Sep 11, 2010

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    Crowded gravestones.....
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    Actually, I found this more interesting than the church..it is always fascinating to read about people from the past.

    They often had such very hard, and very tragic lives. So many children died, often at such a very young age (see comments below about sanitation).

    Although the Brontes are not buried in the graveyard, their servant Tabitha is. See photo for where her grave is sited.

    In Haworth, this was not helped by the fact that the churchyard was (and is) massively overcrowded. It is thought there are 40 000 people buried there, with records dating back to 1645. The churchyard was already overcrowded in the mid-1800s and badly drained: not helpful to the sanitation of the village (which was poor enough anyway).

    There are no paths between the rows of gravestones, as is usual in English churches. They are crammed tightly together. Of course, only the wealthy could afford memorials anyway, so many, many graves are entirely unmarked.

    Do take the time to have a wander round and read some of the inscriptions. There are touristy 'ghost walks'.....if you like that sort of thing, fine....but far better to wander alone during the daytime, and actually get some idea of the reality of life (and death) in Haworth of the past.

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    Visit the church

    by leics Written Sep 11, 2010

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    Exterior
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    The oldest parts of St Michael and All Angels, in the centre of the village, date from the 1400s but there is little to see of them.

    In fact, the church you see today is not exactly the same as the one where Patrick Bronte(father of Charlotte, Emily, Anne and Branwell) became perpetual curate in 1820. His church was largely demolished and rebuilt by his successor. Only the tower was left standing. If you look at the photo you can see where the roofline of the original church was.

    All the Brontes are buried in a crypt in the church, except Anne (who is buried in Scarborough). The Bronte Memorial chapel was created in 1964.

    I only had time for a quick whizz round the church, but noted some lovely stained glass (not Medieval). There is also a beautiful ?alabaster? font, and what I think is a pretty ancient alabaster altar-piece, although the area was roped-off and I could not get near.

    Well worth a visit in itself, but do remember this is not the building in which the Bronte family sat for services....although it is the site.

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    St Michael and All Saints Church

    by suvanki Updated Aug 29, 2010

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    St Michael and All Saints Church
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    The village church is situated in the historic town of Haworth, West Yorkshire. The Bronte family members are buried within the church.There are beautiful stained glass windows and murals throughout.Prior to Rev'd Bronte, the Rev'd Grimshaw had a major influence on the Wesley brothers.

    This church has many links to the Bronte family-Revd Patrick Bronte was the curate here and his tomb can be seen as well as Charlottes grave stone and the Bronte Family chapel.

    The Bronte family are not buried in the churchyard but in a vault beneath the church itself. Anne Bronte, the youngest of the three sisters, died in Scarborough and is buried in St. Mary's churchyard, overlooking the sea.

    All died of tuberculosis at a young age. Charlotte (1816-1855) was 38, Emily (1818-1848) died aged 30, and Anne was only 29 when she died in 1849.

    Patrick outlived all his family and died in 1861 at the age of 84.

    There were three other children in the family apart from the famous authors - Maria 1814-1825, Elizabeth 1815-1825 and his only son, Branwell 1817-1848.

    Services at St Michaels

    Sunday 8-30am Holy Communion (BCP)
    10-45am Family Communion (CW) On the First Sunday in the month there is an informal Worship for All Service, with activities for children.

    Wednesday 2-00pm Little People's Praise, all children under 5 and their carers are welcome

    St Gabriels Church Stanbury

    9-30am each week is a service of Holy Communion or Morning Prayer

    A History of Haworth Church Ancient and Modern is a DVD produced by James Hutton and Norman Scholes £5, may be bought at the back of Church on the Book Stall.

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