Malmesbury Travel Guide

  • Malmesbury
    Malmesbury
    by balhannah
  • Malmesbury
    Malmesbury
    by balhannah
  • Old Bell Hotel
    Old Bell Hotel
    by balhannah

Malmesbury Things to Do

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    Malmesbury Abbey 4 more images

    by balhannah Updated Jan 3, 2014

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    Located in the centre of Malmesbury is "The Abbey."

    I really didn't know the Abbey was there, until I starting walking in the park and found the Abbey entrance gate, a very strong building!
    I walked in through, and there before me was this beautiful Abbey. The one I viewed was from 1180, but evidently a Monastery was on this actual site in 676!
    And so I walked forward, enjoying the view of the Abbey. I reached the Door which had a magnificent Norman Arch containing carvings depicting Bible stories, a really stunning piece of architecture!
    Unfortunately, The Spire is no longer there, if it was, it would be taller than the Salisbury Cathedral Spire, so what a magnificent sight this Abbey must have been when fully intact.

    The Abbey was dissolved in 1539 by King Henry VIII, later becoming a Parish Church, even once
    being used for storing hay and keeping pigs and donkeys.

    Thankfully, this situation has been reversed, restoration work done, and is now in regular use as the Parish Church.

    I read the existing structure is about one third the size of the original building, this must have been one colossal Abbey!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Old Bell Hotel

    by balhannah Written Jan 25, 2012

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    The Old Bell Inn, is located opposite the entrance to the Malmesbury Abbey.
    Built in 1220 and reputed to be the oldest purpose built hotel in England, part's date back to the 13th Century (a window), which may have been part of the old castle.
    It is "pretty as picture" and now is an exclusive Hotel in Malmesbury.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    by balhannah Written Jan 25, 2012

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    Another Town, and another Market Cross in the centre of Town. It was built in 1490, thought to be with stone from the recently ruined Abbey.

    Was everybody happy about the building of this Market Cross, I wonder?
    It was described as a "right costly piece of work," built just to shelter the "poor market folk" when it rained!

    The elaborately carved octagonal structure, is recognised as one of the best preserved of its kind in England.
    It still serves its purpose today, nicknamed 'The Birdcage', because of its appearance, it shelters market traders by day and as a meeting point at night.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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Malmesbury Hotels

Malmesbury Restaurants

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    by NoodleT Written Sep 11, 2002

    This is a really nice restaurant and pub that's suitable for both couples and larger groups. It is preferable to book in advance for dinner.

    Favorite Dish: The cuisine is mainly English and includes meals such as lamb with mint sauce, salmon, beef and chicken.

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Malmesbury Shopping

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    by NoodleT Written Sep 11, 2002

    This is my favourite shop in Malmesbury and it sells really unusual gifts and art work by the owner. Whenever you go there you'll always want to buy something.

    What to buy: Local art is easily available in Malmesbury either at the Blue Door or sometimes it is on display at the Abbey.

    What to pay: Most art work is between £50 to £100, but some is significantly more. You should find something for most budgets

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