Salisbury Off The Beaten Path

  • Frost on a bench
    Frost on a bench
    by LouiseTopp
  • Steam off the water
    Steam off the water
    by LouiseTopp
  • Choir-stall cricket
    Choir-stall cricket
    by leics

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Salisbury

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    Salisbury Library

    by LouiseTopp Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The library in Salisbury is at the corner of the market square next to the Cornmarket Inn. It’s improved a lot over the years & it’s not as dingy as it was. They used to have some swing doors at the front which were very heavy to use, they used to swing back sending you flying across the terrace. The library is approached by a flight of steps inside there is reception and a counter for book renewals/returns. They also have contact point which gives out information on local clubs and societies. There’s also a rear entrance which has a button to push which will open the doors for people in wheelchairs. At the back is the children’s lending library, it’s like being back at school again.

    Every first Saturday of the month they run stories & activities for the children from 11-12pm. They also have family Story Time on the 2nd, 4th & 5th Saturday in the month. There are many activities for children here; on entering you notice the fish tank with two goldfish, & the little furniture next to a small blackboard for the kiddies to scribble on.

    Upstairs in an artist’s galley where the photographic society displays their work, there’s also an area for reference and using the net. Your only allowed two sessions per hour on the net and it will time out whether your in the middle of work or not, but you do get a warning five minutes beforehand. There’s a lift to the upper levels, sometimes he one by the back access, fails to work for some reason. If you want a book & it’s not in, you may order if for 50p.

    The opening hours are:

    9-5pm Monday to Friday
    Saturday is 4pm.

    One of the many activities
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    Salisbury District Hospital

    by LouiseTopp Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ok so this might not have anything to do with travel but I thought I would mention the hospital. It's been here since the 1950's, it used to be ran by the Americana. It has one of the best burns Units in the UK, & they say the staff are very good. There are two entrances, one to the new part while the other goes to the old. Takes a bit of getting round if you never been here before. There's a shop & a cafe just by reception, the shop is round the corner. The Maternity & Downton Ward is nearbye just across the bridge, it's like a rabbit warren & hot as an oven there! You look out a big glass & you can watch the bunnies grooming each other.

    Each bed has a TV called "Patient Line", u can watch TV, make phone calls & read your e-mail. they're like little flat screens, there's also the Day room which is like a living room. Patiant Line in Serum Ward (kiddie's dept), turns off promply at 9pm.

    The Maternity ward has on-suit bathrooms with shower etc. It's very homelike, & there's a conservatory which is very homley, with outside seats, tv & sofa's.

    Salisbury Hospital
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  • Relax in the garden of Salisbury

    by Lifestyles Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Elizabeth gardens was once an allotments until the corronation of the present Queen in 1953, and this area was made up in her honour. It's a lovley area with the River Avon cutting through, and a magnificent view of the Cathdral.

    This is where Constable did his famouse picture The Heywein, also this is an ideal place to relax and feed the ducks, geese and many other bird wildlife. If you are lucky you might even spot kingfishers and foxes.

    There is also a playpark here and sculpted gardens.

    Paddling in the stream

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    Full English Breakfast

    by heitzenrater Written Apr 7, 2009

    So this is a must have well in london or England for that matter. So there is not much to say but it tastes good. Look at the picture to see what you get.

    EGGS
    TOAST
    SAUSAGE
    BACON
    FRIED TOMATO
    SAUTEED MUSHROOMS
    BEANS

    Eat up and enjoy!

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    The tale of William Longspee

    by sourbugger Written Oct 10, 2007

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    This bastard offspring of Henry II was instrumental in the building of Salisbury Cathedral and was also a leading light in the Second crusade.

    His effigy lies in the south Aisle, but he now has notoriety for two other reasons.

    Firstly, when his tomb was opened in the 1790's his skull was found to contain a rat that had died of arsenic poisoning (you just couldn't make this stuff up). If you have a macarbe fascination for such things then the disgusting thing can still be found in the nearby Salisbury and South Wilts Museum.

    Secondly (and completely unrelated to the first), William Longspee is one of the ancestors of the US president : George Bush. I doubt that he has anything so useful lodged in his skull.

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    William Longespee

    by leics Written May 15, 2007

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    William Longespee was present when the first stones of the existing cathedral were laid; he was the first person to be buried within it.

    Half-brother of King John (of Magna Carta fame), his tomb monument can be found in the South Nave Aisle. It is unusual in that the base is made of wood, with a carved stone top.

    Wooden base........... From the other side.........
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    Look for cadaver tombs.............

    by leics Written May 15, 2007

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    Cadaver tombs represent the decomposing body of the person within: they remind of us that our bodies will decay after death, and only the soul lives on. They are quite common in English cathedrals, though were the exclusive province of the rich and powerful (the only people who could afford to have one created).

    Lincoln Cathedral has the earliest, but there is more than one in Salisbury. They became fashionable around the mid-14th century and can also be found in other parts of Europe. Sometimes they have an effigy of the person above, and the rotting corpse beneath but the ones I saw in Salisbury were just the cadaver itself.

    I find them a fascinating insight into the Medieval mind.

    Cadaver tomb 1 Cadaver tomb 2 Cadaver tomb 3
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    Watery art..........

    by leics Updated May 15, 2007

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    There's a rather beautiful piece of modern art in Salisbury Cathedral. Nothing much is made of it (no special pointers or anything) but it's worth noticing.

    Created by William Pye, Sibirica Minor ll was installed in 2005. Its waters appear still when they are, in fact, in constant motion. They provide wonderful reflections of the stained glass and stonework within the cathedral.

    Seek it out; it's near the entrance, but easily missed.

    Reflected beauty.......... Sibirica Minor ll
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    Carvings.............

    by leics Written May 15, 2007

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    The wooden carvings in the 'quire' (choir) of Salisbury Cathedral are not all the Medieval originals, but are well worth exploring nevertheless.

    The oak canon stalls date from 1236, and are the earliest in the country.

    Look under the little drop-down seats (misericords) provided for weary monks to rest their bottoms during services. They date from the 13th century, and are decorated with foliage. The front row of seats are half-replaced with 17th century versions.

    Look on the ends of the pews, and above the stalls.

    Green men, musical angels, insects and animals abound. Many of them date from the restoration of the mid-19thcentury, but are beautifully skilful pieces of work.

    Choir-stall cricket
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    Towering Towers and Scary Stairs

    by grandmaR Updated May 1, 2006

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    It was difficult to take pictures inside the cathedral and flash would not have helped because the area was too large to be illuminated in that way. I tried to take a picture of the way that they had dealt with the fact that the spire was tilted due to the original plans not having anticipated having to support such a high structure, but those pictures did not turn out. The tower has internal flying buttresses and even from the ground one can see the columns bending under the weight and see that the tower has tilted.

    I do have two interior shots, and this is one of them. It shows the interior decoration and one of the newer stained glass windows.

    "Gabrielle Loire from Chartres, France designed the Prisoners of Conscience window in 1980. The candle for Amnesty International and the details on the adopted prisoners of conscience are just below this striking blue glass window in the Trinity Chapel at the east end of the Cathedral."

    There is a tour one can take climbing 332 steps by narrow winding spiral staircases to reach to the foot of the spire 225 feet above ground level. I have not taken this tour as I have bad knees and do not do stairs.

    I understand that from here you can see up into the spire through the original medieval scaffold, and from the outside you can see over the city and surrounding countryside.

    This tour lasts approximately 1.5 hours. Times vary throughout the year.There is a separate charge for a tower tour (4GBP for Adults, 3GBP for Children & Seniors) This is in addition to the *required voluntary* charge for viewing the cathedral.

    The website says: "Children must be at least 4ft (120cm) tall and 5 years old. Each child aged 5-10 must be individually accompanied by a responsible adult... Some of the stone spiral staircases date back to the 13th century and have no hand rails"

    Roof vault Tower from the parking lot Tower from Old Sarum
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    Stonehenge

    by iwys Updated Apr 30, 2006

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    Stonehenge is a UNESCO World Heritage site and Britain's greatest prehistoric monument. I am always amazed at just how incredibly old it is. The site dates back more than 5,000 years. It was built in three phases. In the first phase, around 3,100 BC, there was a circle of timbers surrounded by a ditch and bank. In the second phase, around 2,500 BC, the first stones were erected. They were bluestones from the mountains of South Wales, 350 km away. They were floated on huge rafts around the coast and up the River Avon, then dragged overland. In 2,300 BC came the final phase in the building of the Stonehenge we can see today. Much bigger stones were dragged down from the Marlborough Downs, 32km away and erected in a circle. It was originally built as a place of worship and it is still used by Druids today, who come here to celebrate the solstices.

    When I was a boy, I remember going on a school trip and having a picnic amongst the stones and it didn't cost anything to go inside. Nowadays, the stones are fenced off, and you have to pay to walk through a tunnel and along a path that loops around the stones,
    always about 20 metres away from them. BUT, you don't have to pay, if you don't want to. You can park on a track, just up from the official entrance and car park, and then walk along a grass verge at the side of the road, from which you can see Stonehenge perfectly well. The best times to go are before or after the official opening hours, when it is quiet.

    Opening Times:

    16 Mar-31 May 2006 9.30am-6pm
    1 Jun-31 Aug 2006 9am-7pm,
    1 Sep-15 Oct 2006 9.30am-6pm
    16 Oct-15 Mar 2007 9.30am-4pm

    Admission:

    Adults £5.90
    Concessions/Students £4.40
    Children £3

    It is just 9 miles north of Salisbury. There are trains from London to Salisbury, then buses from Salisbury Market Square to Stonehenge.

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    Lower Bemerton

    by LouiseTopp Updated Oct 23, 2004

    Bemerton is on the western side of Salisbury (in the County of Wiltshire, UK) & is now thought of as a community of that city. Nevertheless within living memory Bemerton was a separate thriving village area, & it has a rich history. George Herbert, the well-known pious poet, was rector of Bemerton from 1630 until his death in 1633, & he wrote much of his work here.

    Lower Bemerton is a small village about 1 mile from Salisbury. Once was out on the sticks, but now with housing developments; they seemed to have caught up with the village. So much change has occurred in Lower Bemerton. There’s still a post office in the village, but soon that will be gone, as the owners are retiring. There’s also a school called Bemerton St Johns in the village, been there since Victorian times. It has a little yard out the front with black railing’s, you can imagine the horse’s & carriages waiting to pick up the children, now it’s just cars. Their website is www.bemerton-st-john.wilts.sch.uk for more info.

    Over the road is a church called St Andrews which has seen much change, if you look over the wall in Lower Road you can still see a hollow where a tall tree in St Andrews Church yard used to be. There’s a large graveyard & there’s also a cricket ground next door. There’s a much smaller church just down the road. In Lower Bemerton there’s a pub called The White Horse, it has a large car park at the rear with one bar.

    Lower Road
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    Victoria Park

    by LouiseTopp Updated Oct 23, 2004

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    Just up from the village of Stratford lies Victoria Park. Named after Queen Victoria after her coronation in 1877, there used to be a band stand here until it sadly burnt down. Here there's crazy golf, tennis, public toilot's & bowls. There are also pretty flower beds there & lot's of tree's. There used to be a football club & field here, I remember the big light's before they moved to Hudsons field.

    Once a year the hospital fate used to come here but they are now gone, & I fear now that Victoria park is sadly going into decline.

    The picture you see is of an old running track which has been grassed over. In 1913 it was said to be very good in the cyclists handbook. Victoria park has 8 entrances, it's next to a busy road, but there's many oaks. Squirrles live there, there's also a playpark there & a stutue of William herbert who was related to the Pembroke Family at Wilton House.

    The Old Track
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    Elizabeth Gardens

    by LouiseTopp Updated Oct 23, 2004

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    At the end of Salisbury by the River Avon is a large grassy area known as Elizabeth gardens. It started out as an allotments during the war, before being turned into a park in 1952 for the queens coronation. There's a good view of the cathedral from here, many posh back gardens from the close back out onto the river; althrough they were flooded quite badly last year.

    There's also a play park here with climbing frames & slide's. During the summer, paddling used to be quite popular in the streams & the river. Now when the motor car was invented everyone headed stright for Bournemouth seafront.

    Part of the river The flooding The island under water Frost on a bench Steam off the water
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    Early Evidence Of Fire Found in Harnham Village

    by LouiseTopp Updated Oct 23, 2004

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    The name Harnham was used with that same spelling as early as 1115. It is thought to be derived from either harahamm or harenahamm. Hara is Old English for "hare", while harena is the genitive plural of the same word, meaning "of hares". Harnham has two pubs they are called the Three bells & The Old Mill.

    Oct. 17, 2003 — building work to build a relief road for Harnham village has exposed one of the earliest evidence of fire in Europe, British archaeologists announced. Charcoal deposits that might date back between 250,000 and 300,000 years ago, were found in Harnham, a village one mile south of Salisbury on South Wiltshire's Chalklands, England.

    "It's really an exciting find. It has come out of the blue as air photography showed nothing of significance. The presence of charcoal suggests the people there made fires. It would seem normal as the climate was cold & damp at the time," archaeologist Helena Cave Penny told Discovery News. The results will be catalogued & put on display in Salisbury Museum.

    Road in Harnham
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