Salisbury Things to Do

  • The Poultry Cross
    The Poultry Cross
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    Cathedral Close
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Best Rated Things to Do in Salisbury

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    Visit the Tourist Information

    by Myfanwe Written Jul 6, 2011

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    Salisbury Tourist Information

    The Tourist Information is a good place to start your visit to Salisbury. Here you can pick up a free street map or for a small fee you can buy a town trail leaflet which will guide you around the City giving information on all the places of interest. There is also a small gift shop here selling souvenirs, books and maps of surrounding areas.

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    The Poultry Cross

    by Myfanwe Written Jul 6, 2011

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    The Poultry Cross
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    The Poultry Cross was used to give shelter to market traders. The original cross would have been close to the centre of the market square but gradually lines of market stalls developed into permanent rows of shops, infilling a lot of the square and separating the cross from the market. The present shelter is 15th Century, but the decorative topping of flying buttresses was added in 1852 in emulation of a cross at Chichester.

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    The Haunch of Venison

    by Myfanwe Written Jul 6, 2011

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    The Haunch of Venison
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    Accross the road from the Poultry Cross you will find one of the oldest pubs in the area. It has a great half timbered exterior with wood panelling and great fireplaces on the inside. Something quite unusual which makes this pub unique is that a macabre find of a mummified hand is on display next to the fireplace in the upstairs bar. This is said to have belonged to a man who cheated at cards and hence lost his hand!! We popped in for a coffee in the afternoon and then for a drink later on. This is a really cosy pub with a great atmosphere.

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    Stonehenge

    by clairegeordio Updated Oct 1, 2004

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    Stonehenge

    Stonehenge is probably the most important prehistoric monument in Britain with over 750,000 visitors every year. Stonehenge is located about 6 miles from Salisbury. Work was completed just under 4,000 years ago. Large stones (Sarsen stones) were brought from the Marlborough Downs, 20 miles away, these could weigh as much as 50 tons each. The smaller stones (Bluestones) were actually brought all the way from Wales, 240 miles away.
    The Stonehenge that we see today is actually just remains of what once was, as many stones over the years have fallen or have been removed for various reasons such as road repairs.
    Nobody really knows why Stonehenge was built, however, as there are many burial mounds in the near area, many people believe that it may have been associated with burial rituals, or others think it may have been a temple, shrine or solar calendar.
    Unfortunately you can no longer walk amongst the stones - there is a rope around them, as since 1985 access to the stones has been severely restricted following damage to the stones at the free festival that used to take place each summer solstice. It has only been in recent times that English Heritage has permitted access to the stones at summer solstice.
    All the same it was a great experience seeing Stonehenge. I only got to see it during the day – it would be amazing to see it at sunset or sunrise. Be aware, Stonehenge does attract A LOT of tourists, so probably best to visit as early as possible (9.30am) to avoid the crowds.
    Entrance is £5.20 for adults and £2.60 for children.

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    Magna Carta

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    My daughter in the cloisters outside the displays
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    The chapter house (no photos allowed) has one of the four surviving original texts of the Magna Carta. (Two of the originals are in the British Library. One is at Lincoln Castle.) I had not gotten over to the British Library while I was in London.

    They had translations into various languages (the original is in Latin) on wooden paddles.

    Part of the translation:

    JOHN, by the grace of God King of England, .. to his archbishops, bishops.. servants, and to all his.. loyal subjects, Greeting.

    KNOW THAT BEFORE GOD...

    (1) FIRST, THAT WE HAVE GRANTED TO GOD, and by this present charter have confirmed for us... that the English Church shall be free, and shall have its rights undiminished, and its liberties unimpaired...

    TO ALL FREE MEN OF OUR KINGDOM we have also granted,..all the liberties written out below...

    (13) The city of London shall enjoy all its ancient liberties and free customs....

    (20) For a trivial offence, a free man shall be fined only in proportion to the degree of his offence, and for a serious offence correspondingly, but not so heavily as to deprive him of his livelihood...

    (35) There shall be standard measures of wine, ale, and corn (the London quarter), throughout the kingdom. There shall also be a standard width of dyed cloth, russett, and haberject, namely two ells within the selvedges...

    (38) In future no official shall place a man on trial upon his own unsupported statement, without producing credible witnesses to the truth of it...

    (40) To no one will we sell, to no one deny or delay right or justice...

    (45) We will appoint as justices, constables, sheriffs, or other officials, only men that know the law of the realm and are minded to keep it well...

    Both we and the barons have sworn that all this shall be observed in good faith and without deceit. Witness...

    Given by our hand in the meadow that is called Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, on the fifteenth day of June in the seventeenth year of our reign (i.e. 1215: the new regnal year began on 28 May).

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    Salisbury Cathedral

    by iwys Updated Apr 1, 2007

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    Salisbury Cathedral was built between 1250 and 1258. The tower and spire were added between 1280 and 1320. It is the tallest spire of any cathedral in the United Kingdom, and it surmounts one of the most beautiful buildings in the country.

    Inside it are some remarkable relics, including an original copy of the Magna Carta and the oldest working clock in the world.

    Opening times: 7.15am - 6.15pm

    "Requested voluntary donations": Adults £4, Seniors & Students £3.50, Children £2

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    Old Sarum

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 8, 2010

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    Old Sarum (Remains of castle and palace)
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    Old Sarum is situated above the Salisbury Plain. It's an important landmark in the region's history for its hill and Norman Fortress. It's the original site of Salisbury where a castle, palace and cathedral were built before the site was moved down the the valley to where present day Salisbury is. You can wander around the ruins including the foundation ruins of the cathedral. Present day Salisbury with the cathedral is seen in the distance.

    It cost 3.50 GBP (July 2010) to explore Old Sarum.

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    Salisbury Cathedral

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 8, 2010

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    Salisbury Cathedral
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    Salisbury Cathedral is one of the largest in England and situated within eight acres of lawn in the spectacular Cathedral Close. It has the tallet spire at 123 m (404 ft) and the largest Cloisters in the UK. It is worth exploring inside the Cathedral for the new Font, designed by William Pye and to celebrate 750th anniversary of the Cathedral; Prisoners of Conscience window and the Trinity Chapel; Chapter House where it's the home to one of the best preserved Magna Carta and where it influenced the democratic world in the past to the present day. To tour the Cathedral, I would recommend a couple of hours to appreciate its beauty.

    It's free to look around but a suggested donation of 5 GBP is always appreciated.

    There's an opportunity to do a tower tour where you can climb up the tower and explore the roof spaces. The tour costs 8 GBP (July 2010) and last 1.5 hours.

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    The Stonehenge Bus Tour

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 10, 2010

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    The best way to visit Stonehenge without is car is joining The Stonehenge Bus Tour. There are hourly (half hourly in the summer) departures from the railway station and the bus station. You go via Amesbury to Stonehenge where the majority of passengers get off and visit. From Stonehenge, you simply wait for the next bus for returning to Salisbury via Old Sarum. There are tour tickets for either just the tour only or tour plus inclusive entries to Old Sarum and Stonehenge.

    July 2010
    11 GBP Tour Only
    18 GBP Tour Only plus entries to Old Sarum & Stonehenge

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    Salisbury Cathedral

    by grandmaR Updated May 1, 2006

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    Main aisle of the church
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    The cathedral was built all at once over just 38 years in the 1200s. It has an old clock c. 1386 (which only strikes the hour - it has no face - it is supposed the oldest working clock in the world), and inside-the-church flying buttresses to stabilize the steeple which is 123 m tall, and is tilting 75 cm to the SW.

    This is because the original plans for the church only had 4 Purbeck 'marble' piers which were to support only a small lantern tower. The tower they ended up with is the tallest in England

    They give our grandson an animal hunt game to play while going through the cathedral.

    Requested Voluntary Donations
    Adults £3.80
    Seniors/students £3.30
    Children (5-17) £2.00
    Families £8.50

    Voluntary is a misnomer here unless it means something different in English English. You weren't getting in unless you anted up.

    The website says "If you are a UK taxpayer, please ask for a Gift Aid envelope. (Through Gift Aid we can reclaim from the government the tax you have already paid on this donation, which represents an additional 28% on top of what you give during your visit.)"

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    Salisbury Cathedral

    by clairegeordio Written Sep 30, 2004

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    Salisbury cathedral

    Salisbury cathedral is Salisbury’s number one tourist attraction, with over half a million visitors every year. The cathedral was started in 1220 and completed in 1258, with the spire, the tallest in Britain being added a generation later. (123m/404 ft). Attractions include Britain’s oldest working clock, which dates back to 1386 and the 1215 Magna Carta, one of four still in existence. The cathedral is surrounded by 8 acres of lawn, including cathedral close, the largest and best preserved cathedral close in Britain.
    If you have time, you can take a visit to the towers and roof. Apparently, you have to climb 332 steps by narrow spinal staircases to the top. Opens at 7.15am-6.15pm everyday except Christmas Day.

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    The Oldest Clock in the World

    by iwys Updated Apr 24, 2007

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    Well, I have looked at it a few times, but I still haven't figured out how you tell the time from it. But, it is certainly a fascinating mechanical contraption that looks about 500 years ahead of its time and I guess if you were a mechanical engineer, this would be your holy grail. To me it looks like a giant clockwork toy, complete with the turning key at the side for winding it up

    The clock was built in 1386 and originally placed in the cathedral's bell tower. It has no face, so you cannot see the time, but it struck the bell on the hour.

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    Walk along the Water Meadow

    by Myfanwe Updated Jul 6, 2011

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    The Water meadow
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    Just minutes away from the hustle and bustle of the City Centre you can find yourself amidst leafy parkland. There are some great level paths which meander their way through the water meadow which is home to an abundance of wildlife. The path is extremely popular with walkers and cyclists alike. As you walk along the path you will get some great views of the Cathedral with the water meadow in the foreground.

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    Visit the Cathedral

    by Myfanwe Written May 16, 2011

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    Salisbury Cathedral
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    Salisbury Cathedral is an archtectural gem. The mighty spire dominates the City and its' exterior is ablaze with the most wonderful carvings you will ever see. Inside you will also find many interesting features, tombs of local dignitories, an Ancient cope chest and the Oldest working clock in Britain. For a small fee you can also view one of the few remaining copies of the Magna carta which is housed in the Cathedral.

    We were a little restricted on what we could see during our visit as there was a service on at the time. We were able to see quite a lot though. I especially loved the Cloisters and cloister gardens.

    There is no entrance fee as such but there is a suggested donation of £5 per person.

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    Mompesson House

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 8, 2010

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    Mompesson House
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    A Queen Anne's townhouse on Cathedral Close was built for Charles Mompesson in 1701. It's worth having a look inside the house for its interior decor. The walled garden is worthwhile exploring and to relax in the wonderful tearoom enjoying afternoon tea and escaping from the city's distractions.

    It cost 5.50 GBP to look around but free to National Trust Members.

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