Salisbury Tourist Traps

  • Tourist Traps
    by cnango
  • Salisbury Museum
    Salisbury Museum
    by LouiseTopp
  • Mompesson House
    Mompesson House
    by LouiseTopp

Most Recent Tourist Traps in Salisbury

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    Stonehenge

    by cnango Updated Sep 11, 2011

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    Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument. It is made up of a large stone circle and surrounded by ceremonial landscape with burial mounds. Even pouring rain doesn't stop the crowds pouring out from the tour buses to see this famous site.

    Related to:
    • Archeology

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    Salisbury & South Wiltshire Museum

    by LouiseTopp Updated Aug 17, 2005

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    Salisbury Museum

    Salisbury museum has seen much change over the years. Its called the Kings House as I think King Richard 3rd stayed there, or Charles 1st. It’s at the end of the close just by the end of the cathedral green. There’s a large car park at the front with low walls & many sweet smelling roses. The entrance door is made of heavy English oak with a latch that is as wobbly as it’s past which lifts up & down. You enter a large reception hall which just smells of the past, the desk is towards the right hand side. The museum used to be in Ann Street, the sign for it is still there. There’s many exhibits there including a display about the history of Stonehenge. There’s also a story about how the body of a rat was found inside a man’s head, if I find out any more about this story I will edit it on. A chess piece from the 13th century was found in Ivy Street, by the superintendent of drainage works. Many things were found when the drains in Salisbury were being revamped. It shows a man sitting on top a horse in a long dress (the fashion of the time; actually it might come back then you bloke’s be after our clothes har har!).

    Unique Suggestions: The remains of an archer in Amesbury was found, the body dates from 2,400BC & 2,200BC which I think is the bronze age. An Auroch’s horn was also found, this animal was a type of cattle that had been living in the UK from the last Ice Age, I have been told that they couldn’t be tamed, & were very wild. Would they have made good guard dogs (or bulls) had they been round today? Eg: Daily Mirror, vandals Seen off by 200 tons of bad tempered Beef, with an attitude. Would have made my uncle’s bull seem like a kitten. I shall be more careful, when crossing that field!

    Fun Alternatives: Opening and Admission:

    Monday to Saturday 10 to 5pm
    Sundays in July and August 2 to 5pm

    Adults £4.00
    Concessions and Groups £3.00
    Children £1.50 (under 5s free)
    Family admission (2 adults/3 children) £9.50
    Schools
    £1 per pupil. Teachers free

    Tel: +44 (0) 1722 332151
    museum@salisburymuseum.org.uk
    http://www.salisburymuseum.org.uk/

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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    Stonehenge

    by Andyuk51 Written Jul 19, 2005

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    Stonehenge is situated about 8 miles north of Salisbury in Wiltshire on Salisbury Plain.
    An old organised heap of stones! Sorry about the synical description and yes its worth a look but to be honest you can get the look you need from the road over the fence without paying the entry fee. The car park is free as well!
    Once you are in the area of the stones you are not able to get close or wander through the stones. Why? Because they noticed that with so many people touching and climbing it was having an adverse affect on the stones namely, they were wearing out!
    They are worth a look bearing in mind their age and historical value etc but dont bother to pay to get in!

    Unique Suggestions: On your way back to Salisbury take the A303 east for about 2 miles, at the roundabout turn right to go into amesbury town. go over the lights and at the mini roundabout turn right to go into the town High st. at the end of the street turn left to take you out of the town. Follow this road for a little less than a mile take the left turn. Follow this road back into Salisbury through a few typical English country villages. There are a couple of pubs to get a good meal or snack or just to sit with a pint in
    The Bridge in at Woodford and The Wheatsheaf in Lower Woodford.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Salisbury Cathedral

    by Andyuk51 Written Jul 19, 2005

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    Salisbury Cathedral is the big attraction in Salisbury, literally! Its spire is the tallest in Britain at 404ft. It attracts many visitors from all over the world and if medieval England is your thing you will love this place! Definitley worth doing on your visit here is the Tower Tour which will guide you through parts of the cathedral not readily available to the general public, ending up at the top of the tower which is the base of the spire. The view from here is excellent and Salisbury can be seen to its perimeter and beyond.
    The Cathedral is contained within a walled area which during the Great Plague of the 1600's was closed to the riff raff who lived on the outside! There are lots of fantastic looking properties. Salisbury museum is in the close called the Kings House at number 65 The Close. There is a military museum in an impressive building called the Wardrobe. The grounds around the cathedral attract a lot of local office workers looking for a bit of peace to eat thier lunch.
    Inside the Cathedral is a very nice, perhaps a bit pricey, cafeteria where light snacks and hot and cold food can be bought. There is a lot more I could write about it but my advice would be to look around the outside of the cathedral as well as visiting the inside.

    Unique Suggestions: Walk around the grounds of the cathedral taking a look at the various properties.
    The Tower Tour.
    A decent snack in the Cathedral cafeteria.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    THE WARDROBE

    by LouiseTopp Updated Oct 23, 2004

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    The Museum

    The Wardrobe in Salisbury cathedral close was used by the clergy for keeping their robes in for services. The servants of King Charles 1st stayed here when the king came to Salisbury to escape the Black Death; one of them is the ghost of a grey lady who died of the disease. There’s a large gravel car park in front of the museum & a café on the right side of the entrance which usually has tables with umbrellas outside. There’s a large garden out the back with the River Avon running through at the bottom facing Elizabeth Gardens area, there’s also a flag flying on a pole on the front of the building & two miniature cannons by the doors. Inside there are many displays of army life including the Wiltshire regiment, D-Day exhibition, War diaries & many more. Admission is £2.75 for adults, OAP’s £2, Children 75p, Family ticket £6, Garden only £75. Last admission is 4.30pm.

    58 The Close
    Salisbury
    Tel: 01722-419419

    Website: http://www.thewardrobe.org.uk/main.php3

    Unique Suggestions: There are many houses in the close to visit like the Medival Hall & the Cathedral. Watch out for cyclists in the close, & pedestrians.

    Fun Alternatives: Salisbury Museum

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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    Mompeson House

    by LouiseTopp Written Oct 7, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mompesson House

    Set in the peacefulness of cathedral close lies Mompesson House. For those of you who are not familiar with the legend of the Tidworth drummer, here is a brief description. Many years ago Mr Mompesson a magistrate & his family, lived in a large house at the Tidworth garrison in the town of Tidworth during 1661. One day he was doing business in Ludgershall when he heard a loud drum beating away. He sent a local bailiff to find out what the racket was & was told that it was a vagrant who had once been in Cromwell’s army. When asked why he was making such a din the man quite incensed said he had every right to play his drum as he said that he had a licence to do this, Mr Mompesson noticed that it was forged & the drummer was arrested. He confiscated a drum, the man begged for it back but he was refused. The man was released the next month, but the drum was kept in Tidworth. When he returned Mr Mompesson’s family was besieged by weird drumming noises, knockings & poltergeist activity. The drumming stopped when the drummer was arrested again in 1663 for stealing. He admitted to the strange noises & was tried for witchcraft & was transported abroad. No one knows what happened to the drum; perhaps it still makes weird noises somewhere.

    Unique Suggestions: The film ‘Sense & Sensibility’ (with Emma Thompson in) has been filmed here. I have sat on a bench in front of the house on the green during summer evenings reading my book, & I have heard doors slamming inside the building when I knew no one was there & the place was locked up! There’s a fine oak staircase inside the building, although there have been some major repairs. The building is now owned by the National Trust.

    Fun Alternatives: Prices to visit are:
    • £4, child £2,
    • Family £9.85 (2 adults & 2 children).
    • Groups £3.50.
    • Garden only: 80p.

    Contact details are:
    wmpkxr@smtp.ntrust.org.uk

    Opening Times: 9th Apr-31 Oct, daily 11pm-5pm Closed Thur & Fri. Last admission 4.30pm.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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Salisbury Tourist Traps

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