Stonehenge Things to Do

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    Stonehenge
    by Myfanwe
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    Stonehenge
    by Myfanwe

Most Recent Things to Do in Stonehenge

  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    Walk round the site

    by uglyscot Updated Jul 1, 2012

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    Stonehenge
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    Although some VT members think the site is a rip off, it is one of those places that must be seen.
    I first saw it as a nine-year old long before the site was fenced in and before there were audioguides.
    We were able to clamber on the stones; but to really see the majesty of the place , you need to be at a distance which is what you are nowadays. It had such an effect on me that I developed a love of archaeology that has never left me.

    Visits can be made at the following times:
    16 Mar-31 May 9.30am-6pm Mon - Sun
    1 Jun-31 Aug 9am-7pm Mon - Sun
    1 Sep-15 Oct 9.30am-6pm Mon -Sun
    16 Oct-15 Mar 9.30am-4pm Mon -Sun
    24-26 Dec and 1 Jan Closed
    Details Recommended last admission time no later than 30 minutes before the closing time. Stonehenge will close promptly 20 minutes after the advertised closing time.

    Entry costs 5.50 pounds, 2.80 for children, 4.10 for concession holders.
    2012 now £7.50 adult, £7.00 concessions., Family ticket £23

    Since 1978 it has been protected, and access restricted. Because of the busy road, access to the site is through a an underground tunnel.

    Many complaints have been raised about the commercialisation of the site, and about a highway's proximity to it.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    Explore the Stone Circle

    by Myfanwe Updated Jun 20, 2012

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    Stonehenge, one of the greatest mysteries left to us by the ancient world, is a Neolithic monument constructed on England's Salisbury Plain during the third millennium B.C. Though much of Stonehenge's purpose during its centuries of activity can only be guessed at, one thing is certain—it was used as a cemetery.

    Stonehenge was built in three major stages: an earthwork formed of a circular ditch and bank; timber settings with postholes dug into the area surrounded by the circular bank; and eventually, the stones so familiar to us today. The exact date for the beginning of each stage is uncertain, but it's most likely that the earthwork was established around 3000 B.C., the timber settings a hundred to a few hundred years later, and the first stone settings by 2500 B.C.

    Stonehenge has got to be Englands most famous stone circle. The World Heritage Site is an exceptional survival from a prehistoric culture. It is aligned with the sun at the solstices and attracts quite a crown at these times. Unfortunately you cannot wander between the stones but can stroll around the perimeter gaining great views of the stones from every angle. There is an excellent gift shop at the entrance and refreshments are available. Stonehenge is extremely popular with tourists from all over the World so my best advice is to try and get there as early as possible to avoid the crowds. The site is owned and cared for by English Heritage so is free if you're a member.

    Admission Prices;

    Adults - £6.90
    Concessions - £5.90
    Children - £3.50
    Familly Ticket - £17.30 (2 adults, 2 Children)

    Check website for opening and closing times - these vary throughout the year.

    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
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  • dplesko's Profile Photo

    Visit Stonehenge

    by dplesko Written Feb 8, 2012

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    Stonehenge "Must see"place is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about 2.0 miles (3.2 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury.

    This is One of the most famous sites in the world. It is composed of a circular setting of large standing stones set within earthworks.

    Probably you will not be alowed to walk inside, but my suggestion is to touch the stone and feel that is not cold.
    You will find one at entrance.

    At the visit time I was lucky to have costimised guide.

    Related to:
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    • Archeology
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  • JulesH's Profile Photo

    Visit Stonehenge

    by JulesH Written Oct 29, 2011

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    The stones up close
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    In henge terms, this is probably the most famous. For this reason it is a little busy and touristy. This can mar the experience a little, but we chose to shun the audio tour which is included with the £7.50 entrance fee, and walked the opposite way round the stones to the other tourists. The henge itself is a little smaller than I expected close up, but it's still a big deal in these parts. Construction began on Stonehenge around 5000 years ago, so it is older than the Great Pyramid at Giza. There is considerable mystery surrounding the fact that the bluestones making up the second stage of circle construction are not local. Furthermore, no-one knows why the henge was actually constructed, although there are theories that it was related to the summer solstice as the sun shines between the heel stones at midsummer sunrise. Whatever you feel about the commercialisation of the site, you cannot deny the ambience is something special.

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Prices and opening times

    by Balam Written May 18, 2011

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    Stonehenge

    Prices

    Adult £7.50

    Child (5 - 15) £4.50

    Child (Under 5) Free

    Concession (student, over 60) £6.80

    Family Ticket (2 adults + up to 3 children) £19.50

    English Heritage and National Trust Members:- Free

    Stonehenge is open every day of the year except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day

    Spring
    1 Apr to 31 May 09.30 - 18.00

    Summer
    1 Jun to 31 Aug 09.00 - 19.00

    Autumn
    1 Sept to 15 Oct 09.30 - 18.00

    Winter
    16 Oct to 15 Mar 09.30 - 16.00
    16Mar to 31Mar 09.30 to 18.00

    Boxing Day and New Year's Day 10.00 - 16.00

    Related to:
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  • Ericasmurf99's Profile Photo

    Stonehenge

    by Ericasmurf99 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I was so excited to finally see Stonehendge! It is roped off, but still exciting. I don't blame them for roping it off, people would probably try to carve theirs names in it or something...

    Gift shop and small snack shop are located at Stonehenge.

    Discounts for world heritage members.

    Summer: 0900-1900
    Winter: 0930-1600

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Look at the Stones

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Section of the circle
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    Entrance is FREE to members of English Heritage, National Trust and Great British Pass Holders. Fortunately our daughter had both a National Trust and English Heritage passes. Otherwise for UK passport holders it is:

    Adult £5.00
    Child (5-15) £2.50

    For Overseas Visitors Pass (OVP) (non-UK passport holders) 7 Day Pass - Adult £12.00

    There doesn't seem to be an option for an OVP to go for just one day.

    Admission includes a free complimentry audio tour
    (available in: Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish, Swedish and Russian)
    10% discount for parties of 11+ paying as a group. You can also get a live person as a guide on site.

    Unfortunately for us, it was a very crowded day and they were out of the audio tours or else the batteries had run down.

    Related to:
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    • Archeology

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Stonehenge

    by spidermiss Updated Sep 5, 2010

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    Stonehenge
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    A World Heritage Site! The ancient stone circle of Stonehenge was evolved between 3,000 BC and 1,600 BC. The stone circle aligns with the midsummer sunrise and midwinter sunset. However, the exact purpose for Stonehenge is unknown although there are claims that the site was built for use by the Druids and yet there are various scientific and religious claims disputing this purpose. No matter what is and isn't believed, Stonehenge attracts many worldwide to come and visit and admire the monument through being inspired or to worship and celebrate.

    Stonehenge can get crowded especially in the summer so it's best visiting first thing or just before closing (bearing in mind that you need to get there 30 minutes before the site closes).

    It costs 6.90 GBP (July 2010) including a complementary audio guide (highly recommended)

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  • dustmon's Profile Photo

    Stonehenge a must-see

    by dustmon Written Jun 11, 2010
    sunrise at Stonehenge

    There are other reviews that cover the details, I will just add that I agree, you need to do a little homework before coming out here, and you will enjoy it so much more----this place has been a sacred spot for over 4500 years! You cannot get right up on the stones as I did in 1973, but the area past the ropes still lets you get a good photo or two and the audio guide is a must as well for more understanding and info.....

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  • clueless83's Profile Photo

    Stonehenge

    by clueless83 Written Apr 17, 2010
    Stonehenge

    I was in the area and decided that I ought to go see this ancient wonder, thought to be built in around 3100BC - the mind boggles to think how old that is!

    If I remember rightly you pay £6 entry fee. Bit of a rip-off if i'm honest as the weather was crap so we didnt get any good photos and the stones are all roped off so you can't get that near.

    Its a bit of a tick the box thing - once you've seen it once you don't really need to see it again.

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  • annase's Profile Photo

    Stonehenge

    by annase Updated Mar 30, 2010

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    This world famous Neolithic period stone monument consisiting of three different stones (Bluestones, Walsh Sandstone and Sarsen) is located on the Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire. It was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1986 for its outstanding prehistoric monuments and is the most famous of such sites in the UK and the whole world. It is also a legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument.

    The monument is composed of earthworks surrounding a circular setting of large standing stones. Archaeologists believe that the unparalleled stone circle that was built around 3000-1600 BC. The standing stones were erected around 2200 BC and the surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC.

    The site is surrounded by a ceremonial landscape comprising more than 300 burial mounds and major prehistoric monuments such as the Stonehenge Avenue, the Cursus, Woodhenge and Durrington Walls. The nearby Avebury henge and the surroundings were co-signed to the UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites.

    Getting there

    Car: From London, take the M3/A303. From Salisbury take the A345. On both routes just follow the signage for Stonehenge.

    Train: Get a train to Salisbury, then take a bus from there. There is a direct connection from London Waterloo.

    Bus: From Salisbury, catch the 'Service 3' bus to Stonehenge (Wiltshire & Dorset bus company).

    There is a small gift shop and cafe on site and toilet adjacent to the car park.

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  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    Walk around the stones.

    by JoostvandenVondel Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Stonehenge is a World Heritage Site and one of the greatest prehistoric monuments in the British Isles. Between 7000 and 8000 years ago the area was mixed pine and hazel woodland and the reason why our pre-historic ancestors chose this site still remains a mystery to both archeologists and anthropologists.

    We do know that the larger stones seen in the circle are called Sarsen stones, brough from the Marlborough Downs 19 miles (30 km.) away and the smaller stones, known as Bluestones, were brought from the Preseli Mountains in Wales, 240 miles (385 km.) away. Stonehenge was constructed in three main phases:

    3050 BC (5,050 years ago) a circular ditch and bank (or henge) was built.
    circa 2600 BC (4,600 years ago) a wooden structure was constructed at the centre.
    2500 - 1500 BC (4,500-3,500 years ago) a stone monument was constructed, arranged and re-arranged for over almost 1,000 years.

    Theories surrounding the purpose and function of Stonehenge still abound today. Some suggest it was a place of religious importance, a place of pilgrimage like today's Lourdes, a place of ancestral worship, an observatory... And aside from many tourists, the megaliths attract a number of modern Druids every year. It's good to know that there are still mysteries that exist on earth, and perhaps that is what remains so interesting about Stonehenge - it stimulates the imagination rather than providing us didactic facts and figures.

    Access to the inner circle (even for Druids) is strictly controlled, so if you would like to visit it, it is advised to call and book a spot well in advance.

    1 Apr-31 May 9.30am-6pm Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat, & Sun.
    1 Jun-31 Aug 9am-7pm Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat, & Sun.
    16-31 Mar 9.30am-6pm Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat, & Sun.
    26 Dec & 1 Jan 10am-4pm
    Closed 24-25 Dec

    Adult:£6.60
    Children:£3.30 (5-15yrs)
    Concession:£5.60
    English Heritage Members: Free
    Family Ticket: £16.50

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • jusdenise93's Profile Photo

    Listen to the headset

    by jusdenise93 Updated Jul 20, 2009

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    Frog Faced Stone

    There is not much to do in here in Stonehenge.

    Listen to the headset that they give you. Enter in the numbers near the rocks.

    It is so interesting how much story you can get out of these rocks.

    The history, the names, and how they are positioned.

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  • heitzenrater's Profile Photo

    Stonehenge Rocks!!

    by heitzenrater Written Apr 7, 2009

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    Stonehenge rocks
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    So you will hear many complaints about how it is a waste of time and it is boring. Well take into account what your going to see before you go. Yes it is a long trip from london by bus, train, or car... but you are going to see a wonder of the world. Correct there is nothing to see but the rocks, and there is also nothing to do. Admiring the stones and understanding that this is one of the few places in the world where a structure like this exists.

    So if you are a person who can admire something for what it is then make you way to this british icon.

    COST
    Adult:£6.60
    Children:£3.30
    Family Ticket: £16.5

    FACILITIES
    Toilets
    Shop
    Refreshments: (Light refreshments)

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Visiting Stonehenge

    by mallyak Written Sep 24, 2008

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    Silbury Hill, also near Avebury is accepted as the largest man-made mound in pre-industrial Europe, estimated at being 4,500 years old. At 130 feet high and definitely not a burial mound its purpose is still very much a mystery.
    Stonehenge seems to have been constructed in three phases, covering the period from 2200BC to 1200BC. It was magnificent feat of megalithic engineering. The gigantic sarsen stones, great sandstone boulders arranged like doorways and capped with stone lintels, weigh up to 50 tons and were dragged to the site from the Marlborough Downs 30km (20 miles) to the north, in a time when wheeled vehicles were unknown.
    Detailed analysis has shown a whole series of astronomical alignments which would explain why Stonehenge was built in this precise spot, regardless of the problems posed by bringing stones from distant quarries

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