Stonehenge Things to Do

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    Amazing but Strange

    by laforstraveller Written Jul 11, 2008

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    So many of us, including myself, have heard of and read about Stonehenge while in school. Nobody really knows why it exists. Was it built for religious or scientific purposes? That is the main debate. And after all of these years, and after all of the studies and research--nobody knows why its here and what it's purpose was.

    I think that's the allure of this place. Some feel that it has this magical, energetic, mystical pull to it. I didn't really get that feeling. But one thing I can say is that it's pretty darn impressive. Some people are disappointed after they see Stonehenge, however, I was not one of them. I was thrilled to finally have seen it. There is something there that make you go, "Wow!" But, I wouldn't call it a mystical engery or anything of the sort. For me, I was impressed with the planning and engineering that had to go behind putting this thing together. These rocks are huge! To think that somebody, eons ago, had an idea and the ability to put this together is just mind-boggling. And then there's the great debate which adds to the draw of this place. Why was it built?

    While on the way to Stonehenge, our taxi driver (37 GBP RT from Salisbury--not a bad deal if you don't want to be cornered in by a tour or bus schedule) informed us that Stonehenge is used a few times a year by the Druids on their "Holiest of Holy" days, which I'm assuming means Summer and Winter Solstices, and possibly All Hallow's Eve (which I know is celebrated by Wiccans-though I'm not so sure about Druids).

    Regardless of why or how it was built, this place is quite impressive, and the drive there is beautiful. While at Stonehenge (and on the drive there), you can see several round burrows (and some long burrows--on the drive). A round burrow is a single grave, and a long burrow is a multiple (I hate to use the word mass) grave.

    Stonehenge full shot Mom at Stonehenge Close up of Stonehenge 1 Close up of Stonehenge 2 Round burrows visible from Stonehenge
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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Go see the big pile of rocks

    by Dabs Written Feb 7, 2008

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    If you've come all the way out to Stonehenge, you might as well cough up the extra money to get a closer look at the stones and for the included audio guide that talks about how the stones probably got there, the different theories about what their purpose was and debunking all of the myths about druids and the devil.

    You can't walk up to the stones anymore, I imagine there are safety concerns but also people were defacing the stones. In all actuality, you can see almost as well from outside the fence, the roped off area around the stones is pretty wide.

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  • robertgaz's Profile Photo

    Stonehenge

    by robertgaz Updated Jan 27, 2008

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    Stonehenge is a ancient megalithic monument located near Amesbury about 13 km's north of Salisbury.

    Archaeologists think that the stones were erected some time between 2500 BC and 2000 BC or even as early as 3100 BC.

    The site and its surroundings were added to the UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites and it is now owned and managed by the English Heritage whilst the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    See the henge :)))

    by Sjalen Written Apr 19, 2007

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    That's what you're here for, right? It is also the only thing to see here unless you intend to hike in the countryside as then there is loads in the form of mounds and other henges. Stonehenge is an amazing monument and it impresses me no end that people created it more than 4000 years ago with only simple tools like deer antlers and chopped down trees. Do take time to walk around the entire henge as the light of course shifts depending on angle, so you keep getting different pictures all along.

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  • davecallahan's Profile Photo

    The Structure

    by davecallahan Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    There isn't much else to see or do out in the middle of the English countryside near the junction of A303 and A334.

    The structure of Stonehenge is impressive in a mysterious way. It is somehow more than just a mound with grass and stones. There is an everpresent but untouchable feeling that you are not alone here (and I am not talking about the crowds of people). Somehow it is very quiet and yet very full of energy.
    I don't think it's anything mystical, but in some way the Druids built something that reaches out to fundamental feelings in theprimitive parts of man. A sense of unity with the world.

    The place is simple but awesome.
    A must see and feel if you are in the UK.

    (and they have a little snack shop that serves tea and strawberry-cream and scones).

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  • wiu_steve's Profile Photo

    Audio Tour

    by wiu_steve Updated Mar 18, 2007

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    Be sure to do the audio tour at Stonehenge. We skipped this and figured out that we could have learned a lot more about the place if we would have spent the money for this part of the self guided tour.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    stonehenge

    by doug48 Written Oct 10, 2006

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    located on the salisbury plain eight miles north of salisbury stonehenge is a marvel of the prehistoric world. this massive structure was built in three phases between 3100BC and 1600BC. the massive bluestones of the circle are believed to have come from pembrokeshire in wales and weight up to fourty five tons. the exact purpose of this structure is not known for sure. it probably is an astronomical calender, a religious site or a combination of both. a very interesting site to visit when in the salisbury area.

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  • DEBBBEDB's Profile Photo

    The Great and Ancient Circle That No-One Knows

    by DEBBBEDB Updated Oct 9, 2006

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    ... Why it Was Built.

    We had, of course, seen Stonehenge, but many visitors also wanted to see it. When my mom and dad came to visit, that was one of the things she wanted to see. It is a World and English Heritage site. We have memberships in two organizations which oversee Stonehenge, so it doesn't cost us anything to take visitors there. There is a recorded tour that is included in the admission (in 9 languages, but we only wanted to listen to English).

    The stones were roped off in 1978, but you can arrange to go into the circle after regular hours of admission by called in the number listed. The solstice is a very popular time to visit.

    Adults £5.20
    Children £2.60
    Family ticket (2 adults & 3 children) £13.00

    Depending on the time of year, the site is open between 9-9:30 am and 4-7 pm.

    There are
    # Tearooms or Restaurant suitable for people with disabilties
    # Male/Female Toilets
    # Guidebooks available in English, French, German and Japanese, large print and braille guides in English only.
    # Shop

    Average stay: 1 hour

    View of Stonehenge Dad, Mom and our son (who is lying down) Another view of Stonehenge Beth and family
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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Walkabout

    by SLLiew Written Sep 11, 2006

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    I guess the thing to do is to walkabout and marvel at the construction of Stonehenge and the mystery behind it. Following a tour guide or reading your guide book as you stare at this structure does not take a long time. It is a distance to get here from London but once you are here, it is just this structure out there. So take your time to take enough pictures. Of course arrive early if in winter.

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    Visit Stonehenge

    by Airpunk Written Aug 28, 2006

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    Yes, this was the most creative suggestion for the name of my tip...

    If you want to vsiti Stonehenge, I would like to suggest a visit early in the morning. The place becomes full of tourist from 11:00 o'clock on. For your visit you will get an audioguide which is available in a couple of languages and is included in your entry fee. Also bookd and leaflets are available.

    Following the audioguide, you will walk counter-clockwise around the stones. Unfortunately, you can't get very close to the stones, but that is understandable due to the large number of tourists. The audiotour will take you to a couple of main points (eight, as far as I can remember) where you can learn something about Stonehenge's history, different theories or particular stones. If you want to hear more, the audioguide also offers you more detailled information at different points. The tour takes around an hour, depending on how many pictures you would like to take and your abilities of listening and walking at the same time :)

    I really enjoyed that walk and the experience of being so close to this place. For those who want to save the 5,90 pounds of entry fee: Yes, there are many people who just drive by and peek through the fence. Yes, you are not allowed to walk within the stone circle and you will only see the stones from distance. But if you are a little interested in this place, take a walk around the stones and listen to all the stories, facts and myths about Stonehenge. If you come to this part of the world, it's a must-do!

    For more information about my trip to Stonehenge or particular Stones, please check out my travellogue.

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  • stevezero's Profile Photo

    Woodhenge - Stonehege's Little Brother

    by stevezero Written Jul 6, 2006

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    Near to Stonehenge, but a lot less well known and visited is Woodhenge.
    It is once again a Neolithic monument, dating from about 2300 BC, with concrete markers replacing six concentric rings of timber posts, once possibly supporting a ring shaped building.
    There is not a great deal to see, you have to use your imagination a lot, but it's free and less crowded than Stonehenge.

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    The Stones in Brief

    by stevezero Updated Jul 6, 2006

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    The stone circle is estimated to date back to 3100 BC. It was constructed in three phases. It has been estimated that the three phases of the construction required more than thirty million hours of labour.
    Speculation on the reason it was built range from human sacrifice to astronomy. It has also beeen used fro solar and lunar worship - and still is to this date, by a dedicated band of followers who return year after year,

    Admission Vharge
    Adults £5.90

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  • stevezero's Profile Photo

    The Heelstone

    by stevezero Written Jul 6, 2006

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    The Heelstone stands allof from the rest of the monument, near the boundary fence. The sarsen Heel Stone is approximately 4.88 m tall with another 1.2 m buried below ground. The Heel Stone is surrounded by a circular ditch. The stone now leans out of vertical but most likely once stood upright. Originally, the Heel Stone may have been paired with another stone now missing

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    Bluestones

    by stevezero Written Jul 6, 2006

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    Inside of the Sarsen stones are a ring of Bluestones. These were bought all the way from the mystical Preseli mountains in Wales, over 385 km away. It must have been a remarkable and dedicated task to have got them to this site in this era of time.

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    Sarsen Lintels

    by stevezero Written Jul 6, 2006

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    One of the mosr remarkable features of Stonehenge are the Sarsen lintels. The average length of the rectangular lintels is 3.2 metres. The lintels were fitted end-to end using tongue-and-groove joints, and fitted on top of the standing sarsen with mortice and tenon joints. it must have been a truly great feat of early building construction.

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