Wiltshire Things to Do

  • Prehistoric landscape
    Prehistoric landscape
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  • Caution: man raising umbrella
    Caution: man raising umbrella
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  • Silbury Hill - largest man-made mound in Europe
    Silbury Hill - largest man-made mound in...
    by view.finder

Wiltshire Things to Do

  • Longleat Safari Park

    Warminster Things to Do

    Longleat is a great day out for all the family. I went with my boyfriend about a week after my mum and nan went - me and my bf got round the whole park in plenty of time but mum & nan didn't but the good thing is, your ticket gets stamped once you visit an attraction so you can only do each thing once but if you don't get chance to do something you...

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  • Longleat Other Attractions

    Warminster Things to Do

    Longleat house operate a 'passport' system, whereby you can visit each of the attractions on the estate once - and you can do it on any day you like in a season. You can also by individual entry to each of the attractions for a few pounds each time. I've already written about the house itself, the safari park, Postman pat's village and the boat...

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  • Centre Park

    Warminster Things to Do

    C P is a real Mecca for kids and families who love biking and outdoor activities! Bikes can be rented for ..........5 pounds a day ..........8 pounds for midweek term ..........12 pounds for the full week. A simple bike lock can be bought for ?1.50 I recommend bring your own good quality one if you have an expensive bike.

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  • Longleat Gardens

    Warminster Things to Do

    The gardens are very clearly the work of 'Capability' Brown. Now that is what I call a nickname. Good job he didn't carry the moniker of 'mixed abilty' Brown! As with all Capability Browns efforts, the scheme involved moving vast amounts of earth to create hills and lakes that contrive to look totally natural. His work is triumph in that respect....

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  • EXPLORE CASTLE COMBE

    We spent about 2 hours exploring Castle Combe. There is a free car park as one enters Upper Castle Combe. On the road down to the village, a large house on the right is known as the Dower House and it was used for the filming of Doctor Doolittle with Rex Harrison and Tony Newley. This Market Cross and historic monument is the centerpiece of the...

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  • EXPLORE LACOCK

    I first visited Lacock near Chippenham about 17 years ago. Not much had changed when I was there in July, 2005. It's a nice village and a popular tourist destination because of Lacock Abbey and the Fox Talbot Museum. The village has been the location for film and TV productions - Prie and Prejudice, Moll Flanders and Emma. There are umpteen...

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  • Stonehenge

    Stonehenge is a famous stone circle listed as World Heritage Site. It dates from between 3000 BC and 1600 BC and it's not clear what exactly had been the purpose of this. But of course there are many theories, legends and myths. And several excarvations are made in the sourrounding area to get some more insight. What is known is that the stones are...

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  • Fovant Badges

    The Fovant Badges are regimental badges, carved into the chalk hills near the village of Fovant. They date from the times of World War I, when there was a military camp there. The badges were carved into the hill by soldiers to remember the people that had died. There used to be more of these badges, but over the years the decayed and not all could...

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  • Old Wardour Castle

    Old Wardour Castle is the middle of nowhere. At least that was the impression that we had when driving through the labyrinth of narrow streets! Although we followed the signs we felt like driving in a circle. But it was worth it, the castle is very nice, located on a little hill next to a lake. It was built in the 14th century as a fortified...

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  • Stonehenge

    Owned by English Heritage the Stones are not normally accessible to the public but on the 20/21st June, the gates are opened ... for free.... for 12 hours and visitors/Druids and anyone who just fancies staying up all night to see the sunrise (or not as is more usually the case)... can touch the stones.. hug the stones... dance naked round the...

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  • Old Wardour Castle

    A 14th century castle, built for Lord Lovel at a time when comfort and 'fashion-victim' status was becoming as important as fortification. Consequently, though it was very much a stronghold, Wardour Castle was sited by a lake. Modified in the 16th century besieged by both sides in the Civil War, Wardour sustained considerable damage - as early as...

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  • Old Sarum

    Old Sarum, on the edge of Salisbury, is an evocative site, reliant more on the imagination than what's actually there - the giant earthworks dating from 500 BC and remnants/foundations of Roman, Saxon and Norman settlements remain (although the site was first settled 5000 years ago). It was here that William the Conqueror, with a new town and...

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  • Salisbury Cathedral

    Built in record time (1220-1258), the Cathedral has a long list of 'most amounts', 'biggest', 'tallest', 'first' to its name - including having Britain's tallest spire (404 feet/123 metres - although this wasn't added until 1310-33), Europe's oldest working clock (1386), the largest cathedral close in Britain (80 acres), the first cathedral girls'...

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  • Stonehenge

    Estimated to have built in 3100 BC, built in three stages, with the larger Mahirs (stones) having been possibly bought from South Wales, a couple hundred kms away. Its reason for existence and use are still opne to debate - ranging from human sacrifice through to astronomy.Whatever the reason, it is one of the most visited spots in the UK today,...

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  • The Old Norman Bridge

    It was a frosty but bright Monday morning in December, 2005 as we set out on our stroll from the Swan Hotel, in fact the difference between the sunlit parts and the shaded valley bottom made photography a bit difficult, as you can see! The town's name actually derives from Saxon times when there was a 'broad ford' here which allowed people to cross...

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  • Lacock Abbey

    During our February, 2004 trip to England, we came across Lacock Abbey in the course of our travels through Wiltshire. The Abbey began its life in 1232 as a nunnary for Augustinian canonesses. Following the break-up of the power of the church by King Henry VIII, ownership of the Abbey passed to William Sharington, who began to transform it into a...

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  • Neolithic Stone Circle

    Having entered the tiny village of Avebury by passing through its encircling ring of standing stones near the clump of trees in the photo, our first order of business was to find a parking spot and then a bite to eat for a late-lunch. This accomplished, we walked straight out of The Red Lion pub, crossed the street and we were amongst the standing...

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  • Europe's Largest Prehistoric Artificial...

    The next thing that caught our attention, as we drove a few miles directly south of Avebury on the A4 highway, was the huge mound of Silbury HIll suddenly jutting up out of the landscape! It was hard to miss seeing it, and its regular conical shape immediately suggested that this was not a natural hill. We stopped the car for a look, but actual...

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  • Visit Avebury.....................

    ...................because it is a superb example of a prehistoric (probably Bronze Age) stone circle, set within a massive ditch-and-bank enclosure. The two museums are very good. And the (only) pub has a real fire and real ales.

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  • Historic Lacock Village

    Lacock Village is separated from the Abbey by a very pleasing landscape consisting of the Abbey grounds, the Botanic Garden and Orchards. The village itself is quite small, and consists of a large central 'square' with houses build along both sides of its four main streets (Church, East, High and West). This organized arrangement was no accident,...

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  • Longleat zoo & Safari Park

    Longleat is the home of Lord Bath; the safari park is very interesting with many animals to see, & lots of entertainments for the kiddies. Set in more than 900 acres of ‘Capability’ Brown designed parkland with a additional 8,000 acres of forests, lakes & farmland, Longleat mixes the magic of the old with the attractions of the new. Longleat was...

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  • Salisbury

    Salisbury is famous for its Gothic cathedral, the tallest in England. It was built in a record time of thirty eight years between 1220 and 1258.Around the cathedral is the Close, an impressive precinct of lawns and Georgian houses surrounded by a medieval wall, which has three gates: North Gate, St Ann’s Gate and HarnhamGate.Market square, St....

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  • Bradford on-avon

    Bradford-on-Avon town is situated east of Bath and divided by the river Avon. This charming town is full of Georgian houses, one of the most attractive ones is the Bridge Tea Rooms (next to the medieval bridge) where you can have a nice tea and cakes.St.Laurence Church is a Saxon church built about 700 AD.The local museum (free entry), located at...

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  • White Horse

    The White Horse is carved on a chalk hillside easily seen on the A4 road if you are driving toward Avebury, if you are driving in the opposite direction you will not be able to see it unless you look back.This huge chalk-cut horse figure is one of the eight which are still visible of the total of thirteen white horses known to have existed in...

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  • Silbury Hill

    If you are driving on the A4 between Marlborough and Bath you can not miss Silbury Hill. It is located eight kilometres west of Marlborough.Silbury Hill is one of the several interesting prehistoric sites of the region. This peculiar conical hill has a maximum height of forty metres. It was built around 2600 BC probably as a burial place.You can...

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  • Avebury

    Avebury village is famous for its Stone Circle. Monumental rocks form a wide circle around the village. Sheeps grazing around the stones and fellow travellers are the only signs of life in the village.The stones are believed to have been built around 2500 BC. You can find more information about the history of the village at the Alexander Keiller...

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  • Lacock

    The picturesque village of Lacock is one of the highlights of any visit to the Wilthsire county. It is located at the southern edge of the Costwolds at about seventeen kilometres from Bath. This photogenic village is owned by the National Trust, which has done a great job to keep it as it was a hundred years ago. It is very popular with tourist...

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  • Corsham

    The charming village of Corsham is located approximately ten kilometres northeast of Bath. The village is full of lovely Georgian houses built in previous centuries from the wealth generated by the wool and cloth trade. The main centre of activity in this peaceful village is the High Street.Both St. Bartholomew’s Church and Corsham Court are worth...

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  • FOX TALBOT MUSEUM - LACOCK

    Former Abbey resident, William Henry Fox Talbot, was an innovative and experimental photographer of the 19th Century. He was the inventor of the negative/positive process. His work is shown in the Museum next to the Abbey.

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  • WHITE HORSES

    Wiltshire boasts quite a few of the famous White Horses. These are figures carved into the landscape on sloping hills.. quite startling to see as one drives past. They're marked on maps.. don't miss seeing at least one.

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  • West Kennet Long Barrow

    Constructed during the Neolithic, around 3500BC, West Kennet long barrow is the largest of its type in England. The mound is 100m long, running East/ West at the crest of Ovebury Hill. Inside, behind the huge stones used to seal the barrow after 1000 years of use, lie 5 separate chambers leading off a 10m long passage. Excavations in 1859 and the...

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  • Silbury Hill.

    Silbury Hill is the largest man-made mound in Europe. Constructed around 2500 BC, it stands about 40 metres high and covers nearly 5 acres. Although various excavations and investigations have taken place over the years, no burial has ever been found and no-one really knows why it was built.It is just stunning.Please do not climb the mound: it is...

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  • Lacock Abbey

    Lacock Abbey was begun by Ela, Countess of Salisbury in 1232 in remembrance of her husband, William Longespee, illegitimate son of Henry II, & one of the most influential barons of the time. On one of her husbands long absences abroad, when everyone thought he was lost & wouldn't return, the faithful Ela refused to marry any of the many suitors...

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  • Old Wardour Castle

    This was very hard to find, but so romantic and fun to visit. It isn't very crowded, but is well worth a visit. You can even picnic on the lawn. The castle was built in 1393 by John, 5th Lord Lovel, a veteran of the Hundred Years War. It was fashioned after the French style at the time. I think that it was featured in the film "Robin Hood - Prince...

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  • Built by Welshmen?

    The inner, smaller man-sized rocks used in the construction of Stonehenge, called 'bluestones' have recently had some light shed on them by the discovery of a mass grave for 7 people. This 2300-year-old grave, only 5-km from Stonehenge was found near Boscombe Down in 2003 during construction activity associated with road works. The grave contained...

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  • Lacock Abbey (Hogwarts Schl in Harry...

    The unique character of Lacock is a result of its long association with the abbey. This was the last religious house in England to be suppressed at the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Lacock Abbey is a beautiful gothic building with medieval features such as the cloisters. For those who are interested, the Abbey's cloisters and side rooms were...

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  • Stonehenge - Two Decades Earlier

    I seem to recall that our first visit to Stonehenge, in May 1981, was a less formal affair. I don't recall paying to view the site but, as you can see in the photo, the strand to keep visitors back a certain distance was there even then! On this occasion, we were living in Papua New Guinea and this was one stop on our 9-week Around-the-World trip...

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  • Stonehenge from the Perimeter

    This photo gives a better impression of what you will see with the naked eye on most of the walk around the circular stones. In addition to the impressive stones, which were arranged in a particular pattern to tie in with phases of the sun, there are also circular ditches and banks (and burial mounds) surrounding the site that are even older than...

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  • Stonehenge

    After our morning walk at Lacock Village, we realized that we were not very far from Stonehenge, so we headed south east, arriving at about 11 AM on a 7 degree C and windy morning. This 7000-year old World Heritage Site is a 'Must See' if ever there was one - with the stone monoliths themselves dating from about 2500 BC. The larger upright stones...

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  • Lacock Village Houses

    Lacock Village is a very impressive mixture of houses and buildings dating from different eras spanning hundreds of years. It has a mixture of timber-framed houses with their protruding upper stories, as well as 17th century stone houses and later on brick Georgian-style buildings. Because of its important position on the stage coach routes linking...

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  • Lacock Abbey Close-up

    Over the course of its history, the Abbey has been altered a number of times, leading to four different building styles being used to make up its present form. Sharington had travelled abroad and he introduced Italian style architecture when he remodelled the estate in the mid-1500s. Since he died childless, ownership passed to his niece Mrs. John...

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  • The River Avon Again!

    This view shows the small road that runs across the front of the estate, heading off across its extensive grounds toward the west. There is a long and narrow arched stone bridge (partially visible) over the River Avon, which we were very surprised to come across again since we had just been there much further north the day before - when we had been...

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  • Cholderton Rare Breeds Farm

    Winner of Wiltshire Family Attraction of the Year Award 1998 and 2000, Cholderton Rare Breeds Farm Park & Rabbit World is a popular tourist attraction set in an attractive rural area on the Wiltshire /Hampshire border. With views to Salisbury Cathedral. Offering a relaxing experience for all ages it’s lovely for the children, particularly in the...

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  • Malmesbury House

    Malmesbury House is the family residence of Mr and Mrs John Cordle. It’s next to St Ann’s Gate & was formerly a 13th century canonry. It’s been enlarged over the years; it was rented in 1660 to the Harris family, whose ancestry became the Earls of Malmesbury House. Behind the Wren façade (1698 - 1704) are rooms with superb decorative plasterwork....

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  • More stonehenge

    Every angle is a picture worth taking......every stone is a wonderment worth reflecting......every step is a step beyond time.

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Wiltshire Things to Do

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