Stourport Things to Do

  • Castle three wheeler
    Castle three wheeler
    by Andrew_W_K
  • Worcestershire County Museum
    Worcestershire County Museum
    by Andrew_W_K
  • Hartlebury Castle
    Hartlebury Castle
    by Andrew_W_K

Most Recent Things to Do in Stourport

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    Worcestershire County Museum, Hartlebury Castle

    by Andrew_W_K Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Less than 2 miles from Stourport is the village of Hartlebury and just outside the village is Hartlebury castle.
    Dating from the 13th century Hartlebury castle is a fortified manor house that was the seat of the Bishop of Worcester from that time until 2007 when the bishop moved back to the cathedral close in Worcester.
    Since 2007 the building has been the subject of much debate and is now in the hands of a trust. It's future looks secure at the moment as the Worcestershire County Museum is housed in the same estate.
    The museum itself contains collections of dolls, archaeology and costumes as well as having rooms allocated to certain times in history (Victorian, Georgian, Civil war etc).
    There is also a collection of Romani caravans in the small transport section which is interesting and the last Castle 3 wheel car that was once made locally in Kidderminster.
    There is a charge of £4 per adult as at 2009.
    There is a cafe and other facilities on site.

    Worcestershire County Museum Hartlebury Castle Castle three wheeler
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    Stourport Bridge

    by Galahad Updated Nov 21, 2006

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    Largely 1870, but parts of the two earlier structures remain. The main arch is made of cast-iron, flanked by stone faced brick arches and a causeway of 25 brick arches to north, 6 to south. The causeway on NE side is of late C18th brick with stone springers to the arches. There is a spiral cast iron stairway from the road down on to the Riverside Meadow. The iron arch is interlaced with circles in the spandrels. Shield with date and initials S.B.T. (Stourport Bridge Trustees) on spandrels at each side. Bridge is the third on this site, the first, of 1775, thought to have been designed by Thomas Farnolls Pritchard. Brick with an iron centre, but it was destroyed in the very bad winter of 1795, along with most of the other river bridges in Worcestershire. It was not replaced until 1806. Photo by Philip Williamson from the National Monuments Record, which incidentally they have made an error with the lettering on the shield on their records. The remaining photos are my own.
    From October 2006 to May 2007 the bridge is being refurbished and repainted. The bridge will be stripped down to its original metal work, all the metalwork inspected and repaired and then the road put back again.

    Stourport 1870 Bridge Flood Arches, Stourport Bridge 9.9.05 Main Flood Arch, Stourport Bridge 9.9.05 Stourport Bridge Cast-iron Spiral Staircase 1.1.06 Stourport 1870 Bridge Trustees Plaque 1.1.06
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    River Cruises

    by Galahad Updated Nov 21, 2006

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    Severn Steamboat Company runs 2 types of trips. On Wednesdays there is a day cruise to Worcester and over the weekend there are frequent 40 minute local cruises. Both are from April to September. Private parties and business functions catered for.
    "River King" has a maximum capacity of 120 people, and is easily adaptable for summer or winter trips - changing from an enclosed boat to an open party boat in a matter of minutes.
    "Carbolate" was a former oil tanker on the River Severn.
    The Company had 3 boats for many years. The third boat in its fleet was the "Miss Jason" but in 2006 it was sold and it has now been taken (by road!!) to a new home on the River Thames. The "Miss Jason" was a World War II hospital boat and after its life as a pleasure boat is to be refurbished as a house boat

    Carbolate 1.1.06 River King in Nov 2000 when river in flood Stourport Steamer Co Booking Office 1.1.06 River King 1.1.06
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    River Cruises

    by illumina Written Apr 23, 2006

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    The Stourport Steamer Company runs several kinds of boat trips on the River Severn. On Wednesdays there are trips to Worcester, serving tea, coffee and soft drinks, which allow passengers two hours ashore in Worcester before the return journey. There are 40 minute short trips every Sunday from March to September and every day of School Holidays; and the boats can also be booked for private functions. The company have three boats - River King has a maximum capacity of 120 people, and is easily adaptable for summer or winter trips - changing from an enclosed boat to an open party boat in a matter of minutes. Carbolate also accommodates 120 people, while Miss Jason has fully enclosed, centrally heated accommodation for up to 90 people to enjoy all year round. Each boat offers an on-board barbecue and salad bar, plus a lounge bar.

    I actually worked on these boats during the summer of 1999, behind the bars - an interesting experience! (Getting paid for the 2 hours of free time in Worcester was the best bit I think!).

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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Redstone Caves

    by illumina Written Apr 23, 2006

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    The River Severn has been a highway for thousands of years. Since Roman times, the main route to Wales was a ford crossing the Severn down stream of the town at Redstone Rock.

    At this place was a famous hermitage, cut out of the sandstone rock, where in the 16th century, Bishop Latimer at Hartlebury, only half-a-mile away, described it as ‘able to lodge 500 men and ready to lodge thieves as true men. I would not have hermits master of such dens’. For centuries before that, the hermits were keepers of the ferry and, among them, in the 12th century, so the legend goes, lived Layamon, the famous monk who was author of ”A Chronicle of British History”.

    Just below the ferry was a ford which was used when low water allowed and it was across this ford, so tradition has it, that the great funeral procession carrying the body of Prince Arthur from Ludlow Castle to Worcester Cathedral for burial made its way in 1502.

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    Areley Kings Church

    by illumina Written Apr 23, 2006

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    St. Bartholomew’s Parish Church, quarter of a mile over the bridge at Areley Kings was founded as a Norman Church. The first known priest was Layamon, author of the first historical survey of Britain. With a continuous history and a partial re-building by the Victorians, the church complex includes a Queen Anne Rectory and medieval timber-framed church house.

    Please see my Areley Kings travelogue for more.

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    Clock Warehouse

    by illumina Written Apr 23, 2006

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    The Clock Warehouse, currently the home of Stourport-on-Severn Yacht Club, is a focal point of the basins. The building is graced by a magnificent clock provided by public subscription and made by Samuel Thorp of Abberley; refurbished in 2000.

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    Tontine

    by illumina Written Apr 23, 2006

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    The Tontine Hotel, was constructed as the Areley Inn in 1772 and gave accommodation to merchants and travellers. It was a grand place with a ballroom and several reception rooms. It is now in the ownership of Britsh Waterways and overlooks the canal and basin.

    A tontine was a sharehold system, an early form of life insurance devised by an Italian, Lorenzo Tonti, in the mid 17th century

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    The Lock Shop, York Street

    by Galahad Updated Jan 22, 2006

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    The Lock Shop was formerly the canal lock keeper's cottage. It is dated 1854 and next to it facing the lock is a small toll office.
    Inside is a cafe which I have yet to try and in the shop window is a really good display of old retail shop packaging.
    The undated photo is from the National Photo Archive by Philip Williamson LRPS but all the rest (with the dates I took them) are my own.

    The Lock Shop from across the lock 20.12.05 The Lock Shop The Lock Shop Window 1.1.06 The Lock Shop Window 1.1.06 The Lock Shop Window 1.1.06
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    Canal Basin

    by Galahad Updated Sep 25, 2005

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    The Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal is the very reason for the existance of Stourport. Have a look at the Georgian canal basins where the canal boats off-loaded their cargoes for transfer to river craft which would take them down the River Severn to places like Bristol. The Dry Dock in the basins is the most northerly of the River Severn Dry Docks and is used ny both the narrow boats and the bigger River Passenger Steamer. The photo of the Clock Warehouse (now the HQ of Stourport Yacht Club) had its clock added by the residents of the town in the 19th century.
    On the riverside downstream of the basins is the old Tontine which is a 17th century canal hotel of which there are only a few left in Europe. It is temporalily closed but there are plans to reopen it. In the 1780's it was the Headquarters of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal Company

    Lower Basin with dry dock in background 9.9.05 Clock Warehouse Exit on to River Severn 9.9.05 Paddle Control 9.9.05 Dry Dock with boats ready to leave 9.9.05
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    Canal Walk

    by Galahad Updated Sep 19, 2005

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    All along the canal through the town are small items and details of interest which cannot be seen from the road on a drive through.
    I have put up some photographs that I have taken along a short 600 yard/metre stretch of the Staffs & Worcs Canal.
    In the 19th century Stourport was a major producer of iron and steel and the first photograph is of the canal warehouse from Baldwin's foundary which now is the only reminder of this industrial past.
    In another photo is the Toll Office that collected a fee from each bargeman as he passed through into the basin where his goods would be unloaded into boats capable of going out to sea and either up to Bristol or round the coast to South Wales.
    Every bridge on the canal has a name plate and the next two photos are of one the bridges and its plate. It bears the old name (Lower Mitton) for this part of Stourport.

    Baldwin's Warehouse 8.9.05 Canal Toll House 8.9.05 Lower Mitton Bridge 8.9.05 Lower Mitton Bridge Plate 8.9.05
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