Worcester Off The Beaten Path

  • Lock gate with the water out of the lock
    Lock gate with the water out of the lock
    by grandmaR
  • Brick wall from beside the canal
    Brick wall from beside the canal
    by grandmaR
  • Pulling the canal boat to a mooring
    Pulling the canal boat to a mooring
    by grandmaR

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Worcester

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    Worcester Canal Life

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Pulling the canal boat to a mooring
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    We rented a canal boat on the Worcester and Birmingham Canal which runs between Worcester and Birmingham. The main line is 30 miles long (48km) with 58 locks. We rented in the middle and went down to Worcester because there were less locks in that direction. In Worcester, the canal intersects with the Severn River.

    The canal was built between 1791 and 1815, and was used for shipping goods. The current canal is under the jurisdiction of the British Waterways and it is being restored by the Worcester & Birmingham Canal Society. Now it is mostly for recreational purposes. The paths along the canals are perfect for jogging, and a canal trip gives a different perspective on the country.

    There are moorings along side of the canal in Worcester although the canal path is now paved and the edge of the canal is brick. There are moorings along the sides which are set in permanently. It would not be possible just to stick a stake into the ground and moor here.

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    Chapter House

    by iwys Written Oct 12, 2006

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    The Chapter House was built by Bishop Wulfstan (1062-95). The large widows were added in the 14th century, It was the first round chapter house in Europe and it is the oldest chapter house in England. It was used as a meeting place for the Chapter of monks, where the affairs of the cathedral and monastery were discussed.

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    Lovely monuments.

    by leics Written Jun 11, 2006

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    A virtuous woman...............
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    There are lots of beautiful monuments and tombs in Worcester Cathedral (as in all English cathedrals) but it is easy to miss them. Take the time to look closely at some...............they not only tell you about the person they commemorate but also about the times they lived in. Look at the clothes on the one in the photo; a perfect example of a virtuous Tudor woman!

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    Traditional pub

    by leics Written Jun 11, 2006

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    Eagle Vaults

    The Eagle Vaults has the most wonderful art Deco tiling on the outside. The actual building is older, probably Charles ll, but the decoration dates from the 1890's. It's worth seeking out just for that, although reviews indicate the inside is pretty traditional too (I didn't go in, too busy).

    On the corner of Pump Street and Friar Street in the city centre.

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    Medieval clues..........

    by leics Written Jun 4, 2006

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    Street sign

    As with all Medieval English cities, there are clues to the past still dotted about even if the layout and buildings are not longer there. For example, any road with 'Butts' in its name may well be where the Medieval 'butts' were........every man was required to practise archery once a week, and this was the place in the town or village where it was done.

    This streetname in Worcester probably means exactly what it says (I have been unable to find its derivation) but it's a good one anyway, especially as there are still several cafes there! 'Mealcheapen street' indeed!

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    Victorian half-timbering

    by leics Written Jun 1, 2006

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    Correct colouring....................

    There are quite a lot of Medieval half-timbered buildings dotted around England, particularly in what were then important cities; Worcester, York, Shrewsbury, Chester etc. Many still exist in country villages too. The Victorians idea of painting the timbers black, and the rest of the building white, has stuck (as has their idea of a Welsh national costume, and of Druids) but is not actually correct. more and more of these half-timbered buildings are now being restored to their original appearance; natural wood and a beige-white plaster. The one in the photo is a good example of how they should look.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Look closely...................

    by leics Written Jun 1, 2006

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    Inscription
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    There are some lovely half-timbered buildings in Worcester (they shouldn't be black and white, that's a Victorian invention). If you look carefully you may see bits exposed to show the original lath & plaster construction, or perhaps an original inscription. This one is carved into the lintel beam of a building at the end of New Street, now a gift shop. the other photo shows the whole building.

    The inscription reads: Love God WB 1577 RD Honour Kings

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    King Charles woz 'ere

    by leics Written Jun 1, 2006

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    King Charles' house

    Worcester stayed loyal to the Royalist cause during the English Civil War. This house, in New Street, is where King Charles l hid after the Battle of Worcester (1651). He managed to escape through the back door but did not, in the end, escape execution.

    The house is now a restaurant, complete with dungeon.

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    Black swans

    by leics Written Jun 1, 2006

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    Black swans

    The Beauchamp tomb is beautiful and highly coloured....you're not likely to miss it as you wander round the cathedral. But you might miss this detail: both Sir John and his lady have their heads resting on black swans (presumably part of the Beauchamp coat-of-arms). The swans are beautifully carved, hers 'on guard' (now minus beak), his asleep. Wonderful.

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    Split in half

    by leics Written Jun 1, 2006

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    Strange..............

    The tomb of Nicholas Bullingham (Bishop of both Worcester and of Lincoln in his time) was orginally set into a recess elsewhere in the cathedral. It may not have looked quite so weird there, but I doubt it; whoever thought up the idea of having him divided by a huge block of masonry? Very strange......................

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    The passing of time...................

    by leics Written Jun 1, 2006

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    Worn steps........

    I think nothing brings home the age of a building more clearly than the wear on its stone steps. These lead into Prince Arthur's Chantry (by the main altar). Imagine how many (millions?) of feet must have passed over them in order to wear down the stone into its beautful curved shape. And still they pass..........................

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    Find the Crusader

    by leics Updated Jun 1, 2006

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    Crusader knight

    In the North aisle of Worcester Cathedral lie three very early (1240) unidentified tombs; two men and a woman. Beautiful in themselves, and lying beneath some superb 13th century carvings, the knight is particularly interesting. His crossed legs are a sign that he was a Crusader; he fought in battles in the Middle East.

    How strange, and terrifying, the eastern world must have seemed to an English Medieval knight.

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    Narrowboat Hire

    by ALANinWORCS69 Written Feb 24, 2006

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    Lowesmoor Wharf
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    Based in Worcester is a company called Viking Afloat.... a company specialising in Canal and waterway holidays.
    They offer narrowboat hire on 4 different itineries departing from Lowesmoor Wharf in Worcester (very close to the City Centre).
    Travelling along the canals of the Midlands you will experience sights and sounds you wouldn't see anywhere else.
    The Worcester-Birmingham canal as the name suggests links Worcester (at The River Severn, Diglis Basin) with Birmingham. Once at Birmingham the whole network of English canals are at your disposal. It's said Birmingham has more canals than Venice!!!
    What better way to explore Worcestershire than by narrowboat.... each night you can moor right next to a pub... Brilliant!!!

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    Gheluvelt Park

    by Galahad Updated Jul 1, 2005

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    Gheluvelt Park Gates 14.10.03

    Gheluvelt Park is one of Britains many formal Victorian Public Parks.
    It is situated about a mile north from the city centre on the Ombersley Road.
    Most major towns created public parks in the second part of the 19th century. In Worcester Gheluvelt Park changed its character in the 1920s with the addition of a grand memorial Great War (1st World War) entrance and along one side of the park a series of alms houses.
    Through the park flows the small Barbourne Brook.
    Between 1960 and 1990 like many of Britains formal public parks Gheluvelt Park was neglected and starved of cash. It was maintained but if repairs were needed they were not done. By the middle 1990s the value of these parks was once again being appreciated and in 2005 Worcester City Council have now obtained a goverment grant to refurbish Gheluvelt Park.
    In the late 1990s the park was extended towards the River Severn and slowly a new wild flower area is being created

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    Elgar's Birthplace

    by Galahad Updated Jul 1, 2005

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    Elgar's Birthplace

    Born 2nd June 1857 - Died 23rd Feb 1934 One of the world's leading classical music composer - Pomp and Circumstance Marches; and his Cello Concerto (played by Jacqueline du Pres).
    My photograph is of his birth place at Lower Broadheath, a village about 4 miles north west of the town centre but without its own VT page.

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Worcester Off The Beaten Path

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