Ewelme Off The Beaten Path

  • The Cattle Pound in Ewelme
    The Cattle Pound in Ewelme
    by easyoar
  • Crows Nest in Ewelme
    Crows Nest in Ewelme
    by easyoar
  • Primroses in Ewelme Churchyard
    Primroses in Ewelme Churchyard
    by easyoar

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Ewelme

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    Jerome K. Jerome in Ewelme

    by easyoar Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Jerome K. Jerome in Ewelme

    This one caught me by surprise as I had no idea it was here.

    If you walk around the back of the church (as in the opposite side from the gate by the road), you will find this gravestone. I only saw it by accident and figured it must be that of Jerome K. Jerome the author of Three Men in a boat (a story of three men who rowed down the Thames in a boat, going through Reading on the way). A quick check on the internet when I got home showed that this was indeed the grave of Jerome K. Jerome. I'm surprised it isn't a little more advertised as he is quite famous here in the UK, and indeed I believe his book is pretty famous internationally too. I have to admit that until now though, I had no idea his middle name was Klapka, or even that Klapka was a name!

    The following 2 websites are worth checking out.

    http://www.jeromekjerome.com/threemen.htm

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/berkshire/bigread/bigread_jerome.shtml

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    Cattle Pound

    by easyoar Updated May 18, 2005

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    The Cattle Pound in Ewelme

    Even in Ewelme, this is very much the sign of a byegone age.

    This is a cattle and stray horse pound into which wild animals were placed whilst there rightful owners were located. This was last used in 1936, and so it has not been used for around 70 years.

    These days it would not be capable of holding any animals at all as it is merely a reproduction with gaps in for people to wander inside and sit down on the benches. Still it makes for an interesting taste of life as it used to be!

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    Blue Flag Iris

    by easyoar Written May 13, 2005

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    Blue Flag Iris in Ewelme

    The Iris plant comes in many different guises. I belieeve that this one that is commonly seen in Britain is the Blue Flag Iris that is the national flower of Quebec (Canada).

    The flag Irises are supposed to be amongst the easiest to grow and to cultivate of all of the Irises. Certainly they grow well in Britain, and they are supposed to grow well in temperate zones.

    This one was growing in the gardens of the Almshouses.

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    Daffodils in Ewelme Churchyard

    by easyoar Written May 13, 2005

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    Daffodils in Ewelme Churchyard

    As far as I am aware, Daffodils to be a native British plant, but these days you wouldn't know that to be the case. In and around March every year, Daffodils can be seen growing everywhere in Britain. I think they may well come from Scandinavia, certainly Holland (Netherlands) is famous for its huge bulb displays.

    I guess that is partly because they look nice and also becaiuse they are one of the easiest flowers to grow in the British climate. A Daffodil is a bulb, which is a 'root' that looks a little like a light bulb in shape. It lives underground and most of the time you don't even know it is there. Then around March time (it needs a cold winter to tell it to grow) it pops up and flowers before dying back and disappearing again until the next year. For this reason you don't tend to see them in hot climates.

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    Primroses in Ewelme Churchyard

    by easyoar Written May 13, 2005

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    Primroses in Ewelme Churchyard

    Primroses are a very traditional British plant that flowers in spring time and has 'primrose yellow' flowers. It is quite a small plant, and could be easily trampled underfoot, so please take care! To my knowledge it is directly related to the Primula which you often see in gardens.

    Primroses are actually a wild plant. As Ewelme Churchyard is very well maintained, you might expect wild plants would not be tolerated very well, but even though they are officially wild, a lot of gardens have them in, and nobody considers them to be weeds! Spring time is the best time to see these flowers.

    The wall you can see in the background is the wall around the churchyard (in this case it is the bit against the road).

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    Snowdrops in Ewelme

    by easyoar Updated May 13, 2005

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    Snowdrops in Ewelme

    These Snowdrops were in the garden just outside the Almshouses in Ewelme. You can easily imagine how large snowdrops are if you consider that the leaves are very similar in size, shape and colour to blades of grass.

    If you want to find out more about Snowdrops, see my Welford page

    The flowers themselves are quite small but the stalks they are on grow above the leaves and then hang down.

    There are many different varieties of snowdrops. The ones in this picture have one flower on each flower stalk. Many other varieties have a double flower (i.e. two flowers per stalk). If you are buying snowdrop bulbs, you normally find that the double headed varieties cost a bit more than the single headed ones.

    Apparently there are also snowdrops in Bulgaria, only they are called 'kokicheta' over there. Thanks to VT hekate for that one!

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    The Crows Nest

    by easyoar Written May 12, 2005

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    Crows Nest in Ewelme

    In nautical terms, a Crows Nest is the bit up on the mast where a lookout was posted looking for land or pirates.

    This however is a proper Crow's Nest. They are high in the trees all around Ewelme. The down side of this is that they are quite noisy and they seem to caw away endlessly. You can see two Crows in the tree just to the left of the nest. They are quite large black birds and are notoriously stupid. They aren't supposed to be able to even count.

    They like shiny objects. I was once in a pub (well outside in the garden actaully) when a crow swooped down to the table next to me that had just been vacated (and food left behind). Rather than steal any food, it grabbed the pepper pot which was a shiny silver colour and flew off with it, much to everyones amusement. Somehow I can't see a crow seasoning its food...

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Ewelme Off The Beaten Path

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