Laycock Travel Guide

  • Lacock street
    Lacock street
    by leics
  • Lacock Abbey
    Lacock Abbey
    by leics
  • Lock-up interior
    Lock-up interior
    by leics

Laycock Things to Do

  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Updated Oct 27, 2010

    I didn't; not enough time.

    But next time I will.

    Apart from the Medieval remains of the abbey itself you can explore the changes made when it was purchased by the Shadlington family and turned into a stately country house.

    The abbey has lovely wooded grounds, and part of it is used as the Fox-Talbot museum. Fox-Talbot lived in Lacock Abbey and created the very first photographic negative.

    Information about opening times, entrance fees etc on the National Trust website:

    http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-vh/w-visits/w-findaplace/w-lacockabbeyvillage.htm

    More information about Lacock Abbey on the Wiki page:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacock_Abbey

    Abbey from afar Another view
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

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    by leics Written Oct 27, 2010

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    The village lock-up dates from the 1700s and is attached to the tithebarn.

    It is what it says it is: a place where miscreants (or drunkards) could be locked up and safely kept overnight or until the next set of trials came around.

    There's a bench bed and a hole in the corner to act as a toilet.

    Most villages had a lock-up, but most are long gone. Lacock, of course, still has its own......though I don't think it is still used!

    Lock-up exterior Lock-up interior
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Written Oct 27, 2010

    A lovely church, with some unusual Medieval painted stonework. Unusual because most of the paintwork in our ancient churches (and they were all painted in the past) was removed or painted over in the centuries following the Reformation (when England broke from the Catholic church).

    Do take the time to go in, and wander round the exterior as well. There are some excellent Medieval gargoyles outside, as well as Medieval carving, tombs and brasses inside.

    Church exterior Interior 1501 brasses 1539 Sharington family tomb 1400s carving in mortuary chapel
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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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Laycock Restaurants

  • msiagrl's Profile Photo

    by msiagrl Written Aug 22, 2006

    This is a nice old restaurant (and there's rooms too) which serves very well cooked English food and vegetables. It all takes a long time though and you can't be in a hurry. Delicious and well presented. Quite pricey: a sunday roast entree was about £12-17. Great for a special occasion, and ye olde English charm. They will give smaller portions for children. bring something to do for kids, rather formal atmosphere makes them fidget!

    Favorite Dish: I had the roast lamb with mint and lemon stuffing which came with all trimmings, the veg was gorgeous and the lamb perfectly cooked. the citrus cheesecake was all right but the passionfruit sorbet that came with it was my highlight.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    by birchy99 Written Feb 14, 2006

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    With our stomachs growling on a late Sunday morning we eagerly searched for a place to have brunch. After scowering Chippinham for a suitable place we retired to Lacock and found The Red Lion. One can't miss it as it is one of two hotels in the village. I think the place also doubles as a B&B but apparently everyone else had finished their breakfasts as we were the sole customers.
    Found the place to be interesting especially the archiatecture. Low ceilings and dark wood beams held the whole place up. Service was fine and the good was tasty and well prepared.

    Favorite Dish: Pretty standard fare, eggs, sausages, toast, etc. Nothing to crow about but pretty traditional.

    We enjoyed our visit

    The Red Lion Dining Room Basic Economics
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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Laycock Transportation

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    by Airpunk Written Sep 5, 2006

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    Lacock is far away from any larger city so that it is difficult to get there by public transport. So a good way to see Lacock together with a couple of other interesting places is Mad Max tours from Bath. The offer consisted of a full day tour for 25.00 pounds, bringing you to Stonehenge, Avebury, Lacock and Castle Combe. The driver was very friendly and rpovided us with background facts about every destination.

    The big advantage of this tour was time saving. As all of these destinations are far away from everything, it is impossible to visit all of them within a day depending on public transport only. Unfortunately, there's only one hour for Lacock which makes it impossible to enjoy the streets of the village, do the proposed Lunch break and visit the Talbot museum which seemed to be interesting.

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