Lower Slaughter Things to Do

  • Lower Slaughter
    Lower Slaughter
    by balhannah
  • Lower Slaughter
    Lower Slaughter
    by balhannah
  • Lower Slaughter
    Lower Slaughter
    by balhannah

Most Recent Things to Do in Lower Slaughter

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    COTTAGE'S

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2012

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    Vine Cottage
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    The Cottage's in Lower Slaughter are all built in the traditional golden cotswold stone.
    It looked like people took pride in their home's, the small garden's had been tended to.
    As I was walking along, I came across Vine cottage [see photo1], read the sign and had to laugh!
    Now, that is a good way to make people shut the gate!

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    THE OLD MILL

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2012

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    The Old Mill
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    I walked as far as the Village went, that is where the River Eye meets the n/west corner of the Village. Heading along another track, I came upon the 19th century Flour Mill, once part of the Manor belonging to the High Sheriff of gloucestershire.
    The giant Waterwheel was still working. Of notice, is the tall red chimney, it really stand's out against the golden colour of the Cottage's.
    The Mill was actually in use until 1958, and still is today, only as a Museum, Gift shop, Tea room and Ice-cream parlour.
    Gerald Harris, a former Jazz singer own's the mill

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    WALK ALONGSIDE THE RIVER EYE

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2012

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    Lower Slaughter
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    This is what I enjoy, walking alongside a River also known as Slaughter Brook], where the Duck's are feeding in the water, and there are lovely Cottage's to view on either side.

    What is best, is I could walk down oneside, and then cross a small footbridge, and return the other side to where our car was parked. There are a few foot bridge's, so if you don't feel up to a long walk, just cross one of the earlier Bridge's, beautiful!

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    A walk through Lower Slaughter

    by King_Golo Updated Jul 13, 2010

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    Lower Slaughter
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    Lower Slaughter is best discovered by foot. The whole village can be seen in 20 minutes if you just rush through, but for those who want to see more, take your time. Things I liked very much in Lower Slaughter include the mill, the manor house and the Cotswolds style houses located at basically every corner.
    The mill is particularly interesting: Last used as a mill in 1958, it has now been turned into a little museum with a great old-fashioned souvenir shop. While the English seem to have mastered the art of selling great souvenirs instead of the usual bric-a-brac anyway, this little shop is even better. See for yourselves. The manor house (Lower Slaughter Manor) is said to be one of the finest country houses in England. I haven't been in but it looked enchanting from the outside as well. It is nowadays a luxury hotel with a good restaurant. Apart from these sights, there are "normal" houses everywhere. They may be normal, but for the first-time visitor they still look extraordinary. Look at my Cotswolds travelogue for some pictures.

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    Walk to Bourton-on-the-Water

    by trvlrtom Written Dec 21, 2008

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    ourton-on-the-Water

    While Lower Slaughter has a slow pace and limited options for food, etc., Bourton-on-the-Water is completely different. It is not a sleepy English village, but a tourist magnet. This town has shops, restaurants, and lots and lots of visitors. It is easy to see why it is so popular, with the beautiful river Windrush winding through town, crossed by arched bridges and banked by wide grassy areas perfect for a picnic. There are many buildings with traditional Cotswold architecture, with limestone walls, pretty gates and fences. When we were here we avoided the restaurants along the main area just because they were so busy, choosing instead a pub along a side road that had a big patio in the back overlooking the river.

    The walk from Lower Slaughter was not all that memorable, but we didn't have to deal with parking in town.

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    The Old Mill

    by trvlrtom Updated Dec 21, 2008

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    The Old Mill is located at the western end of the village. It was built in the nineteenth century and last used as a commercial mill fifty years ago. Now it has a tea and gift shop, which interestingly has a fine selection of Jazz CDs (the current owner of the gift shop is a jazz singer). The interior is quite pretty, with old stone walls and woodwork. We bought some ice cream that was very good, and then worked it off by walking to the next, Upper Slaughter.

    From just around the corner begins the one mile Warden's walk to Upper Slaughter.

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    Walk between the Slaughters

    by trvlrtom Written Dec 21, 2008

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    Little Eye Steam in town.

    For and easy venture away from the crowds and noise of cars, there is an easy walk between Upper and Lower Slaughter. It's one mile long and takes about 1/2 hour each way; less time if you walk without pausing a lot. Here's the directions:

    Walk through the village to the Old Mill.
    Take the footpath that runs along the side of the mill. Signposted ‘Wardens Way’
    Walk along the riverbank and then cross three fields.
    Cross a stone footbridge over the river.
    Walk to the road then turn right.
    Re-cross the river and turn immediately left sign posted 'unsuitable for motors'.
    Walk ahead for 150 yards.
    At the ford, re-cross the river by a stone footbridge.
    Walk up the hill and at the small village square; take the road to the left.
    Walk 50 yards and turn right at the footpath sign.

    Info is from the Lower Slaughter Tourist Information and Travel Guide

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    Wardens Way

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    A poignant reminder of someone who passed by
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    The first photo shows a plaque that indicates that Prince Charles and Princess Di walked this route and the date is indicated on the plaque. It's a poignant reminder of how, despite our wishes, life doesn't always go down the desired path.
    Their country home used to be just outside of Tetbury, not all that far away but, I find somewhat sadly, apparently Di didn't enjoy the country life all that much. To think that amongst all this beauty there was sadness is something I find moving.
    The Wardens Way is one of the many trails in the Cotswolds, as detailed in my other pages, and it surely couldn't get much more pleasant than it was the day we were there. Apparently, in peak times, hundreds of people will be on this path though the day we were there only one other couple was in attendance.

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    The old watermill

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 19, 2005

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    What a lovely setting
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    This little charmer is rather obviously an old mill you will think, and you'll be right.
    The Old Watermill at Lower Slaughter is a former corn mill, first recorded as having been on this site in the 11th century. It was re-built during the 17th century and it is these buildings that can be seen today.
    It last produced flour in 1958, but a continuing project, begun in the 1990's, is gradually restoring the mill, which stands on the River Eye, a tributary of the River Windrush and it has a working waterwheel. You can clearly see the wheel in the second picture.
    National Mills Weekend (surely only England could have such a week), in May of each year, gives visitors an opportunity to discover some of the watermills and windmills that are such an important part of this country's agricultural and industrial heritage.
    Several mills in Gloucestershire can be seen during this year's event, on May 7 and 8.
    Visits are not restricted to the May event, as it is open daily from March to the end of November, 10am to 6pm.

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    Walking the walk

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 19, 2005

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    Rosemarie, at the crossroads
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    Having made the decision to walk to Upper Slaughter we chanced upon a couple (pic 4) who were doing exactly the same thing and we continually overlapped as one or the other stopped to look at something or take a photo.
    At times the trees covered the road (pic 4 again) but at other times there were scenes of the rolling verdant fields with a manor house planted here and there (pics 2 and 3). About half way you come to the intersection in the main photo and even it is partly overgrown by the lush growth prompted by the moist conditions.
    As an introduction to the pleasures of walking in the Cotswolds, a guided walk with one of the Cotswolds Voluntary Wardens offers an unrivalled experience. Programmes are published by the service twice yearly, with walks taking place almost daily. Designed with great care to be enjoyed by walkers of all ages, abilities and interests, they are graded from easy through to strenuous, vary in length from just a couple of miles up to 12 miles or more and most are provided free of charge. Details can be obtained from Cheltenham Tourism, or direct from the Cotswolds AONB Service. Tel. +44 (0) 1451 862000.

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    It's all eyes to the front(s)

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Colourful affluence
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    Though Lower Slaughter has only two bridges it's lovely how you can wander along Wardens Way at either end and disappear into the picturesque countryside in literally a matter of seconds.
    The village of Lower Slaughter is today seen, by the many tourists attracted by the
    picturesque river Eye meandering through the village and the beautiful Cotswold
    stone buildings, as an affluent retirement community, but go back 50 years and this
    was a working agricultural society.
    Of interest is the history of the manor held by the Whitmore family from 1611, the Church,
    substantially rebuilt in 1867, and many noteworthy buildings in the village (35 of
    which are listed as having special architectural or historic interest).
    Sir William Whitmore, M.P. for Bridgnorth, and member of a prominent Shropshire family to
    whom the manor was granted in 1611 and continue to do so to the present day.
    Reminiscences of village life show that up to the Second World War the village was
    mainly self-sufficient and employment was provided by the several farms. Families
    such as the Wheeler’s, Keen’s and Mosson’s have lived in the village for generations.

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    Main Street

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Seeing the beauty of the River Eye

    Lower Slaughter and Upper Slaughter are two of the loveliest villages in the Cotwolds and are just a few miles from Stow. One might expect their names to reflect the bloody history of Stow in the Civil War but actually the name 'Slaughter' derives form the Old English word 'Slough' or 'wet land'.

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    The mill continued

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Part of the atmospheric tea rooms
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    There is a mill museum, and a riverside tea room which looks out over the mill pond. Just the exterior of the tea rooms alone is enough to tempt you inside, unless you're one who might be a trifle put off by a gargoyle sitting next to an old milk container on top of a post box but, hey, it does it for me!

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  • coceng's Profile Photo

    The Place Of Sloe Trees...

    by coceng Updated Aug 19, 2004
    Lower Slaughter, England

    The villages of Upper Slaughter & Lower Slaughter are just 1 mile from one another.
    Once there was a Norman Castle situated in this area but these days, all that are gone down the history line...
    Snapped another house with some flowers at the front.
    This was my last photo in Lower Slaughter; Didn't really want to leave but Roger & Patrick assured me that there would be many more villages & small towns to explore in he Costwold !Next Destination :
    STOW-ON-THE-WOLD

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    Me In Lower Slaughter...

    by coceng Written Aug 18, 2004
    Lower Slaughter, England

    The villages of Upper Slaughter & Lower Slaughter are just 1 mile from one another.
    Once there was a Norman Castle situated in this area but these days, all that are gone down the history line...
    Patrick took a photo of me on his digital camera; Me, standing infront of a house in Lower Slaughter.
    Actually, I wanted to knock the door; I wanted to tell the owner that he had a beautiful house (I know, I know...it's old house to you guys but sheer beauty to me !).
    But then, maybe we would be chased away taking photo infront of his house !
    Err, maybe the guy on the left in the photo was the owner ! Coming out to chase us away ?
    Well no actually 'cos he's just another tourist visiting The Lower Slaughter...

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