Antrim Things to Do

  • Is this the camel?
    Is this the camel?
    by Dabs
  • Things to Do
    by pure1942
  • Things to Do
    by pure1942

Antrim Things to Do

  • THE FIRST IRISH CASTLE

    Carrickfergus is the large castle you can see as you land at Belfast Airport. It is to the north-west of Belfast, so sit on the rights side flying into Belfast and the left when flying out. You can then see it. The castle was built in 1177 by the Norman John de Courcy to defend the approach to Belfast Lough. De Courcy was a knight and grandson of...

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  • 'The Organ' - Giant's Causeway

    The Organ is one of the giant's causeway most impressive formations. When viewed from a distance this formation looks like a giant pipe organ. The basalt rock formed in long, poker straight columns in the cliff face overlooking the centre of the causeway in Port Noffer. The best views of this formation can be enjoyed from the clifftop walk.

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  • 'Wishing Chair' - Giant's Causeway

    The 'Wishing Chair' is the most famous formation at the Giant's Causeway. This famous rock formation is set right up against the waterline is one of the Antrim's most photographed landmarks. The wishing chair comprises of hundreds of columns of hexagonal basalt columns which have formed in a variety of heights giving a stepping stone appearance to...

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  • 'The Giant's Boot' - Giant's Causeway

    This is another of the causeways famous rock formations. This formation is strange as there are no other rocks in the area which formed in the same way. The hexangonal shape of most of the rocks at the causeway is not present with this formation and instead the formation is smooth and rounded. THe huge oddly shaped rock is so called because it...

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  • 'Chimney Tops' - Giant's Causeway

    This clifftop formation is another unusual formation at the Giant's Causeway. The chimney tops or stacks refer to the long, straight rock formations pretruding upwards fromt the cliff headland at the far side of the causeway. This series of stacks sits atop of a terraced headland and has a brown/red colouring. When viewed close up it becomes...

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  • 'The Camel' - Giant's Causeway

    The 'Camel' is yet another formation at the Giant's Causeway. The camel is located in the first of the causeway's three bays - Portnaboe. The camel is so called because when viewed from a certain angle it resembles a camel with a 'hump' of rock protruding from its' centre. The formation rises up from the sea below the visitor's centre.

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  • 'The Granny' - Giant's Causeway

    The Granny is located on the 'Stookans' headland between Port Ganny and Port Noffer. This rock formation got its' name from the stopped over apperance of the formation on the side of the hill. The rock resembles an old woman climbing the hill.

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  • Clifftop Views - Giant's Causeway

    One of the best ways to enjoy the Giant's Causeway is by taking the cliff top path overlooking the causeway and the bays of Portnaboe, Port Ganny and Port Noffer. All the different rock formations can be viewed from the clifftops and birdseye views of the central causeway can be enjoyed from all along the cliff. The paths are well laid out but can...

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  • Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge

    Carrick-A-Rede (from the Gaelic words for 'rock in the road', is another of Co. Antrim's most famous sights or should I say, experience. Crossing the famous 20 metre long rope bridge has been on my 'want to do' list for a long time and now I have finally done it.The bridge originated as a crossing point for fishermen from the mainland out onto the...

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  • Larrybane

    Larrybane means 'the ancient white site' and is the name given to the headland and cliff running down to Carrick Island. The limestone cliffs and headland house a disused quarry and offers amazing views up and down the coast. The headland bends around the bay and the small 'Sheep Island' lies just off it. Didn't see any sheep on it though!An Iron...

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  • STOP on the Bridge

    Thousands of people cross the Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge every year. I wonder how many of them actually stop to take in the views from the bridge. Up, down and sideways, the views from the bridge itself are amazing. those suffering from vertigo should perhaps decline from looking down into the sea and rocks 30 metres below! However everyone can...

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  • Carrick Island

    Once you cross the Rope Bridge you are in for another treat. Tiny Carrick Island is a beautiful spot in its own right. The soft spongy grass is a perfect place to sit and enjoy the stunning views up and down the coast, across to Rathlin Island and even as far as Scotland and the Mul of Kintyre. The little island is also a haven for birdwatchers,...

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  • Old Bushmills Distillery Visitors Centre

    The world oldest licensed distilley from 1608.You can try Whisky taisting. ( Don't drink too much !)Open April-Oct: Mon-Sat 9.30 am-5.30 pm, Sun noon-5.30 pm, last tour 4 pm; Nov-March 7-day opening but reduced tours. Phone for tour times.Groups by arrangement. Closed good friday afternoon, 12 July and Christmas/New Year. Price £5, child £2.50,...

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  • Whiskey Tour

    If you are on a short time scale or small budget, you can wander around the site and see the external buildings... but your miss out on tasting some whiskey.... most of the buildings are Victorian...Its interesting to note that the official site for Bushmils refers to the Irishiness of their product, with no reference to the fact that Bushmills is...

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  • The Giant's Causeway

    The Giant's Causeway is an amazing natural phenomenom.It is an area of hexagonal stone columns that rise out of the ground by the sea.When the ancients first saw it they thought it so bizarre that it must have been built by giants.It truely is a spectacular sight, and the landscape around here is very beautiful too. You can take a walk along the...

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  • Giant's Boot

    One of the attractions at the Giant's Causeway is the Giant's Boot.It must have been left behind when the giant's created the Causeway.It certainly is the biggest boot I've ever seen!!

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  • The Organ

    Another amazing natural rock formation at the Giant's Causeway is The Organ.It is so called as it looks like huge organ pipes.Great place for a photo.Just amazing!

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  • Dunluce Castle

    Dunluce a.k.a. Dun Lios, means "Strong Fort" in Irish. One of Ireland's infamous settings for fantasy tales, movies, or depictions - Dunluce ruins contrast with awe-inspiring grandeur with the precipitous basaltic rock it stands upon over the Northern Sea. It is separated from the mainland by a deep chasm that is crossed by means of a narrow bridge...

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  • Glens of Antrim-Glenarm

    Once you get north of Larne on the coastal road from Carrkickfergus, you start driving through the nine Glens of Antrim, a lovely scenic drive that goes through many small villages and along the coast of Northern Ireland. The 1st village that we came across was Glenarm, the major seat of the Earls of Antrim after Dunluce Castle was abandoned. We...

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  • Glens of Antrim-Cushendall and the Layd...

    After leaving Glenarm we continued on the coastal route and headed to Cushendall where we made a slight detour to see the ruins of the 14th century Layd Old Church. The church was established in 1306 and ceased to be used as a parish church in 1790 when it was replaced by one in Cushendall.A sign at the church says there is a coastal path leading...

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  • Bonamargy Friary

    Just before reaching Ballycastle we made a short stop to visit the ruins of Bonamargy Friary, founded by the McQuillan family around 1500. Julia McQuillan, the Black Nun, is said to be buried near the entrance to the church so that worshippers would tread on her grave, as a token of her humility. Look for the round Celtic cross that you can see in...

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  • Dunluce Castle

    Since we didn't visit the Giant's Causeway because of the rain and wind, we headed to Dunluce Castle which sounded like a great idea until we noticed that it had no roof. We started the visit watching a video about the history of the castle and then toured the ruins of the castle.There may have been a fort here previous to the 16th century when the...

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  • Giant's Causeway

    The Giant's Causeway is Northern Ireland's top tourist draw and it's easy to see why once you've actually seen it, not only does it have an engaging legend to accompany the weird geometric shapes that have popped out of the ground, it's like a giant jungle gym for adults as you can climb up and over it.I'll give you the scientific explanation...

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  • Visiting the Giant's Causeway-the...

    If you drive to the Giant's Causeway, you will have to pay to park, the rate is currently £6 but remember that there is no charge to visit the Causeway so don't get too ticked off by the fee. Coming early doesn't avoid the charge as there are pay and display boxes and you are required to have a ticket on your dashboard. Once parked we asked a...

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  • Glenariff Forest Park

    One of Northern Ireland's enchanted woodlands ... Glenariff Forest Park is full of myth and legends, faeries, and woodland creatures. It is home to a unique Waterfall Walkway that was introduced to tourists 80 years ago and significantly upgraded along its 3 mile length that passes through a National Nature Reserve. The park is a photographer's...

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  • Giant's Causeway-find the rock...

    There are a whole bunch of rock formations that have been named, some of them are very easy to spot, some of them aren't so obvious. What I originally thought was the camel wasn't, and what I thought was a lizard appears to be the camel. I never did spot the granny. Some others to look for are the wishing chair and onion skins.Photo 1-the Giant's...

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  • Giant's Causeway-clifftop footpath

    If you have plenty of time to visit the Giant's Causeway, you can walk along the clifftop over the Causeway coast for a view from above. The stones don't look like much from that high up but you do get a nice sweeping view that you don't get from the lower path. Once you get to the Shepard's path, 162 steps that lead down to a path where you can...

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  • Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

    "Hell no, I'm not crossing that little tiny rope bridge in 30 mph winds, no way, not going to happen" was what I was chanting as we sat in the car waiting for the 3rd or 4th rain storm of the morning to subside so I was a bit surprised when "2 adults" popped out of my mouth at the ticket booth and I forked over my £4.90 x two.They give you plenty...

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  • Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge

    One of the attractions along Northern Ireland's Coastal Causeway that is part of the Giant's Causeway highlights of the area, is a pedestrian suspension rope bridge that connects the mainland to the tiny Carrick island (rock) off the coast. It can't be seen from the parking lot, and you pretty much have to pay admission to get down over to even...

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  • Carrickfergus Castle

    We stayed right next door to Carrickfergus Castle which is located right at the start of the Antrim coastal road as you head north from Belfast. Unfortunately it didn't open until 10am and we were all ready to go so we just had a walk around the outside. Admission was only £2 or £3.The castle was was built by Anglo-Norman invader John de Courcy...

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  • Giant's Causeway

    (Taken from my Intro Page) The crowning glory of the north of Ireland is surely the amazing Giant's Causeway. The causeway was formed as a result of an ancient volcanic eruption which resulted in the formation of these hexagonaly shaped columns of basalt. The rock formations have been declared a World Heritage Site and is one of the world's most...

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  • THE GIANTS CAUSEWAY.

    THE GIANTS CAUSEWAY IS NOTHING SHORT OF STUNNING..HOW THIS WONDERFUL PLACE WAS FORMED IS REALLY UP TO WHAT YOU BELIEVE..SOME PEOPLE THINK THAT IT WAS FORMED WHEN 60 MILLION YEARS AGO MOLTEN LAVA COOLED AND CRACKED AND LEFT THE HEXAGONAL COLUMNS THAT WE SEE HERE TODAY.BUT THE TRUTH IS THAT ALL THIS WAS MADE BY AN IRISH GIANT CALLED FINN McCOOL SO...

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  • CARRICK-A-REDE ROPE BRIDGE

    CARRICK-A-REDE (FROM SCOTTISH GAELIC CARRAIG-A-RADE) MEANS THE ROCK IN THE ROAD.THE ROAD IS THE SEA ROUTE FOR ATLANTIC SALMON ON THEIR WESTWARD JOURNEY PAST CARRICK ISLAND. FOR SOME 350 YEARS NOW FISHERMEN HAVE STRUNG A ROPE BRIDGE 30M ABOVE THE SEA TO ALLOW THEM TO ACCESS THE BEST PLACES TO CATCH THE MIGRATING SALMON. CROSSED REGULARLY BY...

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  • The Haunted Castle at Ballygalley

    Only 30 miles along the magnificent Antrim coast road from belfast, Ballygalley Castle offers a warm meal with shivers. We visited the hotel on a cold wet December afternoon but this only made the castle more atmospheric.

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  • Dunluce Castle, Northern Ireland

    This castle has a very interesting story behind. It is believed to be built in 13th century by Richard de Burgh, and had many residents. The castle also had parts in different military operations.In 1639, while the second Earl and his Countess were there, part of the castle including the kitchens fell into the sea with seven cooks. That's when the...

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  • Saint Patricks Mountain

    Slemish mountain is famous as the location where Saint Patrick tended sheep. He is reputed to have been taken after he was kidnapped in Wales. The climb to the top is a little more difficult than it would first appear. The view from the summit gives superb views across Ulster and part of Scotalnd, particularly, Ailsa Craig. There is a learning...

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  • Giant's Causeway

    The Giant's Causeway is an area of 40,000 tightly packed basalt columns resulting from a volcanic eruption 60 million years ago. It is about 3km north of Bushmills. It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986. The Giant's Causeway is owned and managed by the National Trust. The tops of the columns form stepping stones that lead from the...

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  • Carrick-a-rede Rope Bridge

    This is probably one of the most popular tourist attractions in Northern Ireland. After you pay the admission at the gate, you walk a path along the coastline to the steps going down to the rope bridge. They control the traffic so when you come up almost to the bridge, they will tell you to wait in a line. The island on the other end of the bridge...

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  • Old Bushmills Distillery - "Uisce...

    Its Grant to Distill was given in 1608, they are the oldest distillery in the world.Here, you'll take a guided tour of the plant including the barrel warehouse and the bottling room. The tour ends with a sampling session in the Potstill Bar, which is also a minimuseum with old distilling equipment on display.During the tour, a guide asked for 4...

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  • Finn MacCool's Magic

    The Giant's Causeway is famous for it's Hexagonal Columns. (Some of them have less or more sides, but usually measure about 30cm across.) It is said that the formation of the Causeway had started 61 mil. years ago, and at the end of the Ice Age, the sea Ice grounded its way slowly past the high basalt cliffs eroding the foreshore and helping to...

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  • Giants' Causeway

    The Giant's Causeway, near Causeway Head on the north coastof NI, is a fascinating and stunning geologic site. It consists of numerous basalt pillars that jut in a mass out to sea. It was supposedly built by the giant Finn MacCumhaill (MacCool) who was preparing to battle the Scottish giant Benandonner.

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  • Ballintoy Church

    If you drive down to Ballintoy Harbour, you will pass Ballintoy Church.It is a cute looking, small, white church sitting on a hill, surrounded by a grave yard.Well worth a stop for a photo.......shame about the weather when we were there!

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  • Ballintoy Harbour

    Ballintoy is a small village on the coast, with houses spread down the hill side to a small harbour.The harbour is popular for artists and is a good place to stretch the legs and perhaps stop for a cuppa.

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  • Old Bushmills Distillery

    Bushmills is the worlds oldest legal distillery, having been granted a licence back in 1608.You can do a guided tour, which takes about 1 hour. It includes a short video and talk about the history of Bushmills and then a wander through the distillery and bottling factory.The tour ends up with a sample of Bushmills finest. Four lucky people on the...

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  • Dunluce Castle

    The ruins of Dunluce Castle sit on top of a rocky crag that juts out on the Causeway Coast, joined to the mainland only by a narrow bridge.There is a bit of an eerie feel to the place, and as you wander through the ruins you get a feel for life back in the 16th Century.Back in 1639, a section of the castle including part of the kitchen broke away...

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Antrim Things to Do

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