Fort George, Inverness

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  • The chapel has list of the different regiments
    The chapel has list of the different...
    by kathymof
  • Phone booths & mail box - still a working fort
    Phone booths & mail box - still a...
    by kathymof
  • Ft. George
    Ft. George
    by kathymof
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    Visit Ft. George

    by kathymof Updated Aug 12, 2007

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    The moat
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    Ft. George is still a working fort. It was built to subdue the rowdy Highlanders after the Jacobite Rebellion. You cross an interesting draw bridge over the moat to enter the fort and then can walk around to visit the ramparts, the chapel, the museum and a few other places that are open to the public. The ramparts are great for seeing dolphins in the Moray Firth - the views are wonderful as the Fort is surrounded by water on three sides. It is very well maintained and is quite impressive.

    There is a little cafe where you can get a simple meal - nice place to have tea.

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    Fort George - Guardhouse

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George  - Guardhouse

    The approach to the fortress from the landward side is across a wide area of loose shingle, unsuitable for siting heavy guns, so that besieging artillery is kept out of range. Sloping grassy banks designed to absorb artillery shells all but hide the fort from view. The entrance is reached via a ravelin, a free standing defensive structure incorporating a guardhouse and completely exposed to fire from the main fort.
    The guardhouse is now the ticket office for admissions.

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    Fort George - Regimental Museum

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    The Fort Major's house facing the parade ground houses the Regimental Museum of the Queen's Own Highlanders. This is a good place to spend a few hours if the weather turns nasty, as it often does in these parts,

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    Fort George - Bastions

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George  -Bastions
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    Fort George has many bastions, or gun emplacements around its walls. Most point out towards the Cromarty Firth as it was thought that any attack would come from the sea. There are great views from here and it is a good place to spot dolphins.

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    Fort George - Barracks

    by stevezero Updated Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George  - Barracks
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    Accomodation consists of three storied Georgian architecture of the barracks which form streets around a central square, very much like an elegant small town of the period. Some are now museums, and other building sre still used for their original purpouse as troop housing.

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    Fort George - Fortifications

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George  - Fortifications
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    The fortifications form an outstanding example of defence in depth. The main walls are stone faced, in plan faceted and angled with projecting bastions so that every wall face is covered by fire from guns sited on top of other walls. The walls are many yards (metres) wide and grassed over, on top of barrel vaulted casemates which form underground bunkers designed to protect the entire garrison from artillery fire. The approach to the fortress from the landward side is across a wide area of loose shingle, unsuitable for siting heavy guns, so that besieging artillery is kept out of range. Sloping grassy banks designed to absorb artillery shells all but hide the fort from view. The entrance is reached via a ravelin, a free standing defensive structure incorporating a guardhouse and completely exposed to fire from the main fort, then by a raised wooden walkway, complete with drawbridge, bridging across a wide ditch set between heavily defended bastions. The ditch forms a wide killing ground openly exposed to gunfire from these walls.

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    Fort George - Magazine

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George - Magazine
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    Fort George has a restored magazine, or powder store. this is a specially designed building where the gunpowder was stored. You can still see the barrels, doubt if they are still full these days, but smoking probably not recommended!

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    Fort George

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George
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    Fort George was a revelation after the dissapoinment with Urquhart castle. We spent hours here and came away very satisfied with our visit of the place.
    After the 1746 defeat at Culloden of Bonnie Prince Charlie, George II created the ultimate defence against further Jacobite unrest. The result, Fort George, is the mightiest artillery fortification in Britain, if not Europe.
    Its garrison buildings, artillery defences bristling with cannon, and superb collection of arms – including bayoneted muskets, pikes, swords and ammunition pouches – provide a fascinating insight into 18th century military life.
    Positioned strategically on a promontory jutting into the Moray Firth, Fort George was intended as an impregnable army base – designed on a monumental scale using sophisticated defence standards. Today, it would cost nearly £1 billion. Within almost a mile of boundary walls was accommodation for a governor, officers, artillery detachment, and a 1600-strong infantry garrison. It also housed a magazine for 2,500 gunpowder barrels, ordnance and provision stores, a brewhouse and chapel.

    In the care of Historic Scotland -
    Admission charge - Adults £6.50

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    The far end of the Fort

    by shivan Written Sep 6, 2005
    the far end

    Finally I reached the far end of Fort George, quite a remarkable walk, as the fort itself is very very big.
    Here there are some cannons left from the past centuries. Watching the firth from the walls it is clearly evident how stratigc the position of the fort actually was.
    A few considerations now. Fort George is nice, I can't say no, but I didn't find it very attractive because it has nothing particular in it, so pay a visit to it only if you are particular interested in military history, otherwise drive somewhere else.

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    Inside the Chapel

    by shivan Written Sep 6, 2005
    inside the chapel

    The Fort George Chapel, titled to some saint I can't remember, has been the last part of the fort itself to be built, several years after the completion of the other portions of the structure.
    The king that ordered construction was planning to let a garrison constantly barracked there, and so the fort itself was not compelte without a chapel
    The window picture shows the only angel with a pipe in the whole Scotland

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    Visiting Fort George, really a thing to do?

    by shivan Updated Sep 3, 2005
    The Fort George maingate

    Let's discuss this.
    First, a short introduction. Fort George is a large military installment east of Inverness, about 20 kilometers away from the town.
    It is really in a good form, also because it is still used for tattoos and barracks for the highlander battallion of the Army.
    The ticket is expensive here too, unless you have the mythical Explorer Pass I bought days before.
    ---continues---

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    Fort George - Drawbridge

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George  - Drawbridge
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    Entry into the main fort is by a raised wooden walkway, complete with drawbridge, bridging across a wide ditch set between heavily defended bastions.

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    Fort George - Views From

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George  - Views From
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    From the bastions of Fort George you get great views of the Cromarty Firth and the Black Isle opposite. It is also a good place to spot the dolphins who often pass by.

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    Fort George - Chapel

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George - Chapel
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    The chapel within the Fort George compound still serves as a place of worship and is open to the public. There are some interesting standards of the army on display.

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    Fort George - Mock Fireplace

    by stevezero Written Jun 17, 2006

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    Fort George - Mock Fireplace

    Really liked this one. If you can't afford a real fireplace, then just draw your own on the wall. Wouldn't imagine it would have the ame warming effect in winter though!

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