National Museum and Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

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    Scottish National Gallery
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    View from Market Street
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  • clivedinburgh's Profile Photo

    National Gallery of Scotland

    by clivedinburgh Updated Jan 7, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance to the gallery

    The National Gallery of Scotland is located on The Mound behind the Royal Scottish Academy and contains a large quantity of paintings from the early Renaissance to the late 19th century. These buildings were designed by Sir William Playfair and have recently undergone a major refurbishment to expand the facilites on the lower level.

    Access is free to this and the following galleries but donations are always happily accepted.

    The Scottish National Potrait Gallery on Queen Street

    The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art lies opposite the Dean Gallery on Belford Road to the West of the city

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    The National Gallery of Scotland

    by dila Updated Oct 29, 2006

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    national Gallery of scotland
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    I am not a person who like much about art. but some paintings i like. the paintings from Titian i liked very much especially the colours.
    Admission free. A charge may be made for special exhibitions.

    Normal opening hours:
    Open daily 10am-5pm. Thursdays until 7pm.

    Festive period opening hours:
    Closed 25 and 26 December only. Open 1 January from 12noon-5pm

    It is not aloud to take pictures in the museum

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  • cheekymarieh's Profile Photo

    National Gallery Of Scotland

    by cheekymarieh Updated May 29, 2006

    The National Gallery of Scotland is the oldest of the Galleries within the city. It houses a vast array of European paintings and sculpture covering the Renaissance to Post-Impressionism periods. Some of the famous works of art on display include: El Greco's Fábula, Botticelli's Virgin Adoring the Sleeping Christ Child and Antonio Canova's Three Graces, shared with the Victoria & Albert Museum(it is presently on display in the gallery). My personal favourite is Monet's Haystacks.

    The artworks themsleves are housed in a building which was designed by William Henry Playfair . The foundation stone was laid in 1850 by Prince Albert, and the Gallery was officially opened in 1859. Since my last visit, the gallery has undergone a major refurbishment programme.

    Open daily 10am-5pm. Thursday until 7pm

    Admission: Free except for special exhibitions.

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  • sparkieplug24's Profile Photo

    Museum of Scotland & the Royal museum of Scotland

    by sparkieplug24 Updated Apr 23, 2006

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    These museum are free and to be honest when I visited I did not see everything and probably didnt do them justice. On entering the museum you can get a map you can also have an audio tour which is also free and they offer guided tours at various times of day. The two museums are right next to each other and show many different exhibits which are very interesting. Mostly these exhabits are about Scotland but they are very interesting and worth a visit

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    National Gallery of Scotland

    by Dabs Written Feb 4, 2006

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    National Gallery of Scotland

    I visit art museums in practically every large city that I visit and while the National Gallery is not one of the more impressive art museums that I have visited, it's free to visit so if you have a spare hour stop by and have a look at the section of Scottish art on display in the lower galleries, something you will not likely see in another art museum, at least not in this depth.

    There are also some other well known painters on display and the museum is small enough so that you can view the other galleries and still not spend more than an hour.

    There are other branches of the National Galleries of Scotland, the Dean Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, Portrait Gallery and Royal Scottish Academy Building (next door to the main National Gallery), there is a free shuttle bus that runs between them from 11 am-5 pm.

    Tip: Open until 7 pm on Thursdays

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  • clivedinburgh's Profile Photo

    Museum of Scotland

    by clivedinburgh Updated Jan 23, 2006

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    The tower and entrance to the Museum of Scotland

    The museum is an extension to the Royal Museum and to my eye, adds a modern twist to a stunning building. Inside it details how modern day Scotland came to be in terms of landscape and wildlife through a series of exhibits. It then goes onto the men who shaped the peoples of Scotland into one nation and on through the Act of Union to the industrial 1900s and early 20th C.

    The Tower Restaurant is now back open following a short refurbishment and has been held in high regards by critics since it opened in 1998. The views from the top of the tower where the restaurant is located are stunning.

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    National Gallery of Scotland

    by Marpessa Written Jan 2, 2006

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    The National Gallery of Scotland

    The National Gallery is a great gallery to check out while you are in Edinburgh. It is in the heart of the city just in the Princes St. gardens. The building itself is absolutely beautiful and was completed in 1853. The gallery is composed of a series of large rooms, where you will find artworks by: Poussin, Gauguin, Gainsborough, Tintoretto, Rembrandt as well as many Scottish artists. It has all different kinds of arts from the Renaissance to Post-Impressionism.

    You are free to walk around at your own leisure and should you get tired, or just want to sit and stare at your favourite painting, there are chairs throughout the gallery. I did notice that there was a group of people going around on a tour, with their guide pointing out details in the paintings and getting the group to offer their opinions on the artwork. For information about tours you should contact the museum.

    Another great thing about this gallery is that entrance is free (although when they have special exhibits they charge a fee if you want to view those galleries as well).

    Opening Hours
    Mon-Wed, Fri-Sun: 10am - 5pm
    Thurs: 10am - 7pm

    Festival Opening Hours
    (1st of August - 3rd of September)
    Mon-Wed, Fri-Sun: 10am - 6pm
    Thurs: 10am - 7pm

    1st of January: 12pm - 5pm

    Closed:
    25th-26th of December

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  • zizkov's Profile Photo

    National Galleries

    by zizkov Updated Oct 21, 2005

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    National Gallery
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    The National Galleries of Scotland consists of five galleries in Edinburgh, centred on the National Gallery and Royal Scottish Academy, in the heart of the city.

    Major refurbishments have taken place recently as part of the Playfair project (named for William Henry Playfair, a major figure in Edinburgh's architecture). These include the Weston Link which joins the National Gallery and RSA, and provides an entrance from Princes St Gardens.

    General entry to the galleries is free, though charges are made for special exhibitions.

    There is a free bus linking the galleries.

    The fourth picture is the imposing red sandstone edifice of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. I had not been in before yesterday, but it is quite diverting. I gave the historical worthies the go-by, and looked instead mainly at the exhibitions. One, on the philosophers garden, mingled quotes from Rousseau and black-and-white garden photos, to dull, yet pretentious, effect.

    The other was The Healing Touch, which looked at Scotland and medicine, and was much more interesting. The Company of Surgeon-Barbers was given charter by the Edinburgh town council 500 years ago (1505) and Royal seal the year after. Early steps for formalised medical training were made, after many physicians trained at Leyden (Netherlands) and there have been quite a few medical advances, and notable figures in medicine, from Scotland since.

    Also notable are the contemporary portraits, particularly a couple of striking and witty images by David Mach. The entrance hall is also a rococo riot, with a frieze of figures from Scottish history, and large portrayals of battles and other historical scenes, around the balcony.

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    NATIONAL GALLERY

    by hevbell Written Oct 9, 2005

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    national gallery

    On my last visit to Edinburgh my evening plans fell through at the last minute but I was saved from having to just head home early by it being a Thursday & therefore late opening night at the National Gallery :) It was somewhere I hadn't been yet and seemed a good idea to check it out!

    Its one of the two large stone buildings on the mound, the other being the Royal Academy. Although separate buildings a new "link" and entrance has been built below the two and is accessed from Princes Street Gardens, on the Waverley side of the buildings. This allows access to both buildings without going outside and also contains a restaurant [of course!], lecture theatre , education centre and IT gallery.

    Admission to the permanent collection is free and it includes works by many of the Impressionists, Rembrandt, Rubens, Botticelli and also Scottish artists such as Ramsay, Raeburn and Wilkie. Definitely worth seeing!

    A bus runs between this location and the other city art galleries - the National Portrait Gallery, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Ayr and Dean Gallery

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  • zizkov's Profile Photo

    Dean Gallery

    by zizkov Updated Sep 20, 2005

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    Dean Gallery front
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    The Dean Gallery is part of the National Galleries of Scotland. About 15 minutes walk from the West End (and very near the West End SYHA) Dean Gallery is in a fine parkland setting, and just across the road is the Gallery of Modern Art. The banners in the picture are for the Mario Testino Portraits exhibition. Highlight: two-storey high picture of Robbie Williams with his sparkly Union Jack underpants over his face.

    The building was originally the Dean Orphan Hospital, and was opend as a gallery in 1999. Houses parts of the Dada and Surrealist collections ( I also saw a major Magritte exhibition there); and a substantial body of work donated by Edinburgh born sculptor Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, including a packed recreation of his London studio.

    Currently showing (to 23 Oct 05) is a Henri Cartier-Bresson photography exhibition, making its only UK stop on a world tour, and the biggest HCB retrospective ever staged in the UK.

    The Dean is linked to the other galleries by the NGS Gallery Bus.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Museum of Scotland

    by Nemorino Written Jul 1, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museum of Scotland

    This FREE museum tells the story of Scotland on five floors, from the "Beginnings" (landscape and wildlife, and the last Ice Age) by way of the "Early People (from around 8000 BC to AD 1100) and the "Kingdom of the Scots" (up to the union with England in 1707) to a floor on "Scotland Transformed" and another on "Industry and Empire".

    There is also a sixth floor which is now closed, but will re-open in a year or two with a completely new exhibit on contemporary Scotland.

    Open Monday to Saturday 10am - 5pm, Tuesday 10am - 8pm, Sunday 12 noon - 5pm. Admission is free.

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    Dean Gallery

    by stefano99 Written May 21, 2005

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    Master of the Universe

    If you happen to be staying at the Menzies Belford Hotel then the Dean Gallery is located across the road.

    The gallery has some interesting works by Eduardo Paolozzi, one of Scotlands great artists (Italian parents).

    Admission: Free
    Open: 10am - 5pm

    Free bus service runs between the Gallerys.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Museum of Scotland

    by MalenaN Updated Mar 19, 2005

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    The Lewis chesspices

    Museum of Scotland is part of the National Museum of Scotland. On five floors the history of Scotland is displayed, from the geological formation to the 20th century. To see everything it would be good to return many times (entrance is free). I did not see everything when I was there but concentrated on “The Kingdom of the Scots”, but I also saw some more.
    At the entrance you can get a plan over the museum and in the big room called Hawthornden Court you can pick up free audio guides.
    The chesspices on the photo were found on the island Lewis 1831. They were made of walrus ivory in the 12th century when the Norse ruled the Hebrides.

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  • dixonchan's Profile Photo

    National Gallery of Scotland

    by dixonchan Written Nov 2, 2004
    National Gallery of Scotland

    The National Gallery of Scotland, oldest of the five Galleries, is situated in the heart of Edinburgh on The Mound, between the ancient Old Town and the Georgian New Town. It is home to Scotland's greatest collection of European paintings and sculpture from the Renaissance to Post-Impressionism, and is one of the very finest galleries of its size in the world.

    Normal Opening Hours:
    Open Daily 10am - 5pm. Thursday until 7pm.

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    National Museum of Scotland

    by wrongbus Written Sep 24, 2004

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    Whatever you do, take a look at the national museum of Scotland, a stunning piece of architecture in a city which has suffered more than most from the whims of draughtsmen over the past few decades. The design borrows from a long history of castles and Pictish brochs, or forts, with a great curtain wall finished in golden Clashach sandstone from Morayshire and a circular corner tower which cleverly echoes the curves of the Half Moon Battery on the castle across the Old Town.

    When it went up, we were relieved the new building was so easy on the eye, but it was the exhibits inside which moved so many. Here at last Scotland’s history is told through a gathering of treasures secured from private collections and foreign hands, stunning pieces such as the carved chess set left by the Vikings on the island of Lewis and the little eight century Monymusk reliquary, closely linked with St. Columba. While the museum helps Scots place their past within a global context, it also allows visitors to understand the renewed pride in the land. Here are innovators, explorers, writers, key figures in world history and reminders of the days when Edinburgh was a the centre of the European Enlightenment and later when industrial Glasgow was known as the Workshop of the World.

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