Penicuik Travel Guide

  • Penicuik
    by littlesam1
  • Window from the Roslyn Chapel
    Window from the Roslyn Chapel
    by littlesam1
  • suet claudi and tropicgirl77
    suet claudi and tropicgirl77
    by Suet

Penicuik Things to Do

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    by Suet Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    You have to come and see the Castle, even if it IS just a ruin. It's quite alarming to watch your guests realise that they do not, in fact, have a head for heights when they walk down the completely unprotected battlements to the castle. You can see the original sandstone and where the wind and weather has fretted the stone. You can book nights at the castle in the liveable part but only with a fair amount of notice.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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    You can see the sign above Igraine's head!!!! 1 more image

    by Suet Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Well, if you don't know about the Chapel by now, shame on you! What with the film, the book and the publicity, our visitor numbers have increased from 6,000 a year to 35,000. Funnily enough, the tour doesn't wallow on about the da Vinci Code at all and sticks primarily to the history and the carvings of the Chapel itself. The whole tour can last over an hour, with guides starting the chat every half an hour. Cost is 7 British Pounds per person but you can get concessions if you are over 60 or a student. Good old VT managed to get the concession rate!!!

    The general aura of the Chapel is somewhat marred by the fact they have scaffolding surrounding it and a corrugated iron roof covering it. They repaired the roof and their story is that it will take 5 years for the stone to dry out. The only advantage of the scaffolding is that you can climb it to view the carvings on the roof and also see the surrounding countryside so much better.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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    The trout stream that powers the mill 4 more images

    by Suet Updated Apr 3, 2010

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    This is the little known Powdermill which used to make gunpowder for the Napoleonic Wars. It was created in the 1800's to manufacture and store the gunpowder which was used in sailing ships' cannons and general mining work. As you proceed down the steep path to the Mill, you can see rooms cut and built into the rock face on the right of the path. These were used to store the powder as it is still fairly damp there with small streams running down the cliff face. Before you get there, on the right up a small grassy slope you will find one of the remaining charcoal burners dated 1863. They used alder wood to turn into charcoal for the gunpowder and the plan is to coppice the wood again and try to encourage the growth of the alders.

    There is a story that a man who lived in the village was killed in an explosion. His widow married another man who also was killed. No one wanted to marry her after that !!!

    The website below gives you up to date information about the activities in the Glen and some of the history,

    The Mill closed down in 1953.

    It's a wildlife site nowadays with a fine trout stream and pretty walks.

    My Cottage is named after it.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • National/State Park

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Penicuik Hotels

Penicuik Off The Beaten Path

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    Glencorse Parish Church 1 more image

    by Suet Written Sep 13, 2006

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    This is a quiet Parish Church with a congregation of about 50 people. It's off the main road and set in a location in the fields. We were fortunate enough to be invited in to see the church and also invited to attend the service on Sunday. The people who were doing some maintenence on the church were very friendly and welcoming and let us go up into the gallery to take pictures.

    The architecture is well worth seeing as there are very few red brick churches. The same architect did some work in Edinburgh.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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