St. Mungo's Museum, Glasgow

4.5 out of 5 stars 11 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • St. Mungo's Museum
    by geetamallya
  • Signage
    Signage
    by gordonilla
  • Cafe interior (1)
    Cafe interior (1)
    by gordonilla
  • Drever's Profile Photo

    St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art

    by Drever Written Feb 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art museum
    3 more images

    This unique museum explores the importance of religion in people's lives across the world and across time with Buddha, Ganesha, Shiva, amongst other spiritual leaders, saints, and historic figures treated equally. The themes of life, death and the afterlife are explored through works of art. Admission is free.

    The museum promotes understanding and respect between people of different faiths. It has mesmerizing sculptures, pictures and displays on religious practices and festivals such as the Mexican Day of the Dead, as well as interactive exhibits on the effects of religion on Glasgow life. It is a one off chance to explore religion and art, the past and the present and learn how they interact, which in itself is quite a unique experience.

    The building, which stands on the site of the medieval Bishop's Castle, was opened in April 1993 is intriguing both inside as out. The museum offers unrivalled views over both Glasgow Cathedral and the Necropolis, the dramatic 19th-century graveyard on the hill behind. In addition it is situated near Provand's Lordship, the oldest house in the city.

    The main gallery is a double height room illuminated with a wealth of colours created by stained glass windows depicting Christian saints, include a depiction of St. Mungo himself, and prophets. Natural and artificial light is subtly controlled to unsure perfect illumination on the watercolour painting and textile floor covering.

    There are three floors and four exhibitions areas: the Gallery of Religious Art, the Gallery of Religious Life, the Scottish Gallery and a temporary exhibition space. In the Gallery of Religious is the awesome figure of the Hindu god Shiva, Lord of the Dance. The Gallery of Religious Life explores the world's six main religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism. In this gallery people of all religions talk about their faith, and you meet the Mexican Day of the Dead skeleton, celebrating the victory of life over death.

    The Scottish Gallery presents the fascinating story of how religion has shaped the culture and beliefs of people in the West of Scotland from earliest times to the present. An outstanding collection of artefacts, including Celtic crosses and statuettes of Hindu gods, reflects the many religious groups that have settled throughout the centuries in Glasgow and the west of Scotland. This rich history is depicted in the stunning Sharing of Faiths Banner, which celebrates the city's many different faiths.

    Beside the museum you can contemplate in Britain’s first permanent Zen garden, a masterpiece of simplicity, symbolising the harmony between people and nature. Zen is a Buddhist method of contemplation and is part of the tradition of Dyana (Chinese Ch’an, Japanese Zen), which depends on the simple life and a rejection of worldly pleasures and a return to nature. The stones, gravel and grass represent - in miniature - mountains, water and land and are meant to inspire contemplation. The layout of the garden derives from the unbroken tradition studied by Mr Tanaka in Kyoto, Japan.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    A museum for the faiths

    by gordonilla Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Exterior (1)
    4 more images

    The St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art is a pleasant place to visit. The galleries are full of displays and works of art.

    Their aim is to promote understanding and respect between people of different faiths and of none. It offers an opportunity for visitors to find out more about some of the world’s major religions, and the story of religion in the west of Scotland.

    I enjoyed the visit and relaxed a little in the museum café, and enjoyed the first Zen garden in Britain.

    St Mungo Museum regularly hosts temporary exhibitions and a variety of events, from family-friendly activities to talks relating to religion in Scotland today.

    The museum sits across from Provand’s Lordship – the oldest house in Glasgow – and alongside the medieval Glasgow Cathedral.

    Was this review helpful?

  • geetamallya's Profile Photo

    Museum about all religions

    by geetamallya Written Jul 11, 2010

    I found this museum quite interesting. They have art works, photography and facts about various religions around the world. A section is dedicated to facts related to Religious influence on our day to day life and rituals was the best section
    Came to know some interesting facts about different religions.

    There is a souvenir shop as well within the premise.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • kit_mc's Profile Photo

    Inter-Faith Exhibits

    by kit_mc Updated Sep 1, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Mungo's Museum

    The St Mungo's Museum of Religious Life and Art is a small, intimate museum displaying artefacts in an educational way from a variety of religions and faiths. As well as the world's main religions, such as Islam, Christianity and Buddhism, there are examples of more 'exotic' faith systems such as those of Aboriginal Australians.

    Some of my favourite items were the Buddha's from the Burmese tradition and a Native American rug. The museum appears to act as a centre for inter-faith dialogue, which in our present times sounds like a good thing to me. A major exhibit covers various themes such as death, marriage, birth and how people of different faiths deal with and celebrate different stages of the lifecycle.

    Displaying religious objects in a museum has its own set of curatorial considerations that make choice of object and placement quite a delicate operation. A curator should be mindful that it may not be appropriate to place certain objects in the same display case, or that in some faiths it may not be allowed for a particular gender or for someone outside that faith to see certain objects. The placement of Buddha statues, which should always be the highest object in the display case, or the Qu'ran, which should also always be highly placed. As you see the different objects located together, it might be interesting to think how you'd place such seemingly disparate objects together in themes while being mindful of their importance and meaning to different faith groups.

    The Glasgow Necropolis, a 19th century cemetary is located behind the museum and you also get a good view of the cathedral from 3rd floor.

    Entry is free. Don't bother with the gift shop btw, it's got mainly tat rather than anything truly educational or religious. Except maybe if you need a pair of rosary beads...

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Religious Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 22, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art

    St Mungo was the parton saint of Glasgow. The building is in the Scots Baronial style; it's actually a recent addition to Glasgow's museums, completed in 1992. It contains a treasure trove of religious artwork, artifacts, and memorabilia.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • CelticFire's Profile Photo

    an unusual museum

    by CelticFire Written Feb 27, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Mungo's museum of Religious art, is somewhat unusual. In a new purpose built building, it houses many fine pieces including Salvador Dali's Christ of St John on the cross a very contentious piece. In addition it is directly across the road from the Provand's Lordship, reputedly the oldest house in Glasgow.

    Was this review helpful?

  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    St. Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art

    by seagoingJLW Written Jul 14, 2005
    St Mungo Museum

    This museum is unique. Its displays emphasize the importance of religion in people's lives around the world and over time.

    There are the Gallery of Religious Art, the Gallery of Religious Life, the Scottish Gallery and a temporary exhibition space.

    The Gallery of Religious Art has stained glass windows depicting Christian saints and prophets.

    The Gallery of Religious Life explores the world's six main religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Cruise

    Was this review helpful?

  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    MUSEUM OF RELIGIOUS ART

    by hevbell Updated Nov 3, 2003

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Mungo Museum


    Entry: Free
    This is a fairly new museum, and the first of its kind in the world, situated right next to Glasgow Cathedral. It was originally intended as a visitor centre for the cathedral and this now occupies the basement.
    One floor concentrates on religion in Scotland while the other has works of art representing the six main world religions. which include Dali's 'The Christ of St John on the Cross'. There is also an exhibit using artifacts from all over the world to illustrate various aspects of different religions such as customs relating to birth, death, marriage etc Outside there is a Zen buddhist garden as well, overlooked by the obligatory cafe.
    I have to say this museum was a lot more interesting than I expected. I'm not religious and thought it might be a bit preachy or something. I just thought I might as well go in anyway, since it was free but was far from disappointed!

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • oneonta_ni's Profile Photo

    St. Mungo Museum

    by oneonta_ni Updated Apr 8, 2003

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stained glass detail

    St. Mungo Museum of Religious Life & Art
    1000-1700 Monday to Saturday
    1000-1700 Sunday
    Admission FREE
    I thought this would be a bit boring really, not being a religious person, but someone had mentioned that it was really interesting so I decided to have a look. It turned out to be a rather fascinating museum with art and religious objects representing nearly every religion. There was information about customs and different religious beliefs which was quite interesting. There are also some very nice stained glass windows that are at eye level so you can see the details more closely.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • blackmamba's Profile Photo

    St. Mungo Museum

    by blackmamba Updated May 13, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. Mungo Museum

    when we where there it was "Religon" that was the team for the moment.. a bit boring.. but it is for FREE..

    Was this review helpful?

  • marciaca's Profile Photo

    St. Mungo's Museum

    by marciaca Written Mar 17, 2004
    St. Mungo's Museum

    St. Mungo is the patrion saint of Glasgow. This museum has some religious artifcats and religious art. It's free, so it's worth a quick look.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Glasgow

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

96 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near St. Mungo's Museum
3.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0 miles away
Show Prices
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
0.5 miles away
Show Prices

View all Glasgow hotels