Island of Mull Things to Do

  • Tobermory
    Tobermory
    by JessieLang
  • Distillery
    Distillery
    by JessieLang
  • Puffins on Lunga island
    Puffins on Lunga island
    by MikeBird

Most Recent Things to Do in Island of Mull

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    FIONNPHORT

    by mtncorg Written Oct 2, 2007

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    St Columba Centre will teach you about the Man
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    Fionnphort is not much more than the ferry terminal for the short ride over to Iona. There are a few shops, b/b’s and a small market. Free car parking is set back a few hundred meters east of the ferry landing next to the St Columba Centre - look for the sign pointing to the left off the main road just as you come into the town. The centre itself, a turf-roofed building, acts as both tourist informational center and holds several very informative exhibits concerning the life of St Columba - the man, his life and deeds of the 500’s. Most of what you see on Iona is from what was developed 500 years after St Columba had passed from the scene, so it is a good place to begin to understand who and what it was that inspired the latter development of a place of pilgrimage for the Christians of Scotland.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Hiking and Walking

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    DUART CASTLE

    by mtncorg Written Sep 30, 2007

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    Duart Castle shines high on its rock in the sun
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    The castle at Eilean Donan en route to the Skye Bridge seems to get in more travel pictures, but Duart Castle just seems more emblematic of Scottish castles to me - massive, looming, standing high upon its rock above the confluences of sounds and lochs that separate Mull from Oban. The oldest walls of the castle date to the mid 13th century but earlier forts probably preceded. The walls on the landward side are 29 feet/9 meters high by 10 feet/3 meters thick. There are two keeps inside the walls - the larger north keep is open to public (9 pounds) while the south keep is where the family of the clan leader still lives part-time. Exhibits within the north keep include the kitchen and dungeon - where Spanish officers of the Armada were imprisoned - with stairs leading on to the next level where there is a pantry, the magnificent Sea Room and the Great Hall holding portraits of Macleans going back over three hundred years. Going higher up spiral staircases turning clockwise - which allowed defenders to fight unimpeded with swords in their right hands - you come to a bathroom, dressing room and State bedroom. The final level brings you to an exhibit area covering the history of the Chiefs of the Clan Maclean and their part in the greater Scottish saga. You can also walk outside around the battlements atop the north keep and look far off in al directions. Nicely maintained ground surround the castle - manmade boat slips are found beneath the base of the castle to the north and a small souvenir shop and tea room are available just across the lawn from the castle entrance. It is possible to come over from Oban as a foot passenger and catch a shuttle bus for the two mile ride from the Craignure ferry terminal.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Tobermoray Distillery Trip

    by Mortyone Written Apr 3, 2007

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    A visit to the Distillery in Tobermoray is well worth the admission price of £2.50.

    Especially as you get you to sample the local Malt and they give you a £2.50 diiscount on purchases.

    The Iona Malt is manificent if you like very peaty malts.
    It is only available on the island so don't wait until you get back to the mainland to get a bottle.

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Wine Tasting

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    MULL MUSEUM

    by hevbell Updated Mar 3, 2007

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    Toberymory

    If you want to learn more about the island and its history then the Mull Museum - on the main street- is worth a visit. It explains all sorts of things from the geology of the island and ancient sites, to the way of life and some of the islands more notable events. entry is £1

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    Iona

    by nickandchris Updated Sep 4, 2006

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    Looking to Iona
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    Iona is seperated from Mull by the mile wide Sound of Iona and is a mere 1.5 miles east to west and 3 miles from north to south.
    Access is from the small port of Finnphort on Mull, where you must leave your car, where ferries ply back and forth regularly. These are passenger only ferries as vehicles are discouraged from landing on Iona, there being only 3 miles of navigable road. The population of 100 or so is centred around Iona village. There are a few hotels and B&B places, as well as the odd shop and restaurant, but mostly it's farms and residential buildings. No camping is allowed on Iona.

    Most people journey to Iona to visit the monastery that St. Columba founded when he landed in 563 AD.. He had, in fact, banished himself to this island where he later introduced Christianity. There is the largest collection of Christian carved stones in Scotland here.

    There are beautiful white, sand beaches to walk to and enjoy, though during the daytime you'll be sharing them with the rest of the crowds. Iona is a very popular destination and only when the ferries stop running for the day does peace and quiet return to those lucky enough to have found accommodation.

    We opted to not go with the flow so didn't make the crossing to Iona. I had visited many years ago in my teens and remember walking in the pouring rain from one end of the island to the other to a most fantastic beach.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beaches
    • Religious Travel

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    Loch Na Keal

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 29, 2006

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    That's us.....Loch Na Keal
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    A very picturesque sea loch, a mere three miles from Salen to the head of the loch at Gruline. It is dominated by Ben More, Mull's highest mountain (3,170 ft.)
    From Gruline, take a left turning that brings you out on the south shore of Loch Na Keal. It's a B. road and narrow but has plenty of passing places. Watch out for cattle and sheep on the road as they roam freely.
    This road has quite a few grassy areas to pull off onto, unusual for Mull, and gives ample opportunity for wild camping.
    The road proceeds to the end of the loch, hugging the coastline and passing the Isle of Eorsa. It then narrows right down and hugs the sheer cliff face for a distance, climbing along the way.A real sense of being hemmed in!!! After passing the end of the loch, with more small islands dotted about, the road turns inland and so on to Loch Scridain where it joins the A849.
    Taking the road from Gruline, following the north shore of Loch Scridain, you are once again rewarded with magnificent views looking back over Ben More. Along this road, not far from Gruline, is the basic farm camp site mentioned under accommodation tips. After the campsite, there is a sign forbidding camping for 6 miles or so. This route twists and turns it's way up above the loch and takes you to the left hand turn to the tiny passenger ferry for the Isle of Ulva, at the open sea end of the loch. The route then proceeds northwards along Loch Tuarth, offering excellent views to Ulva.

    We fell in love with this loch with it's wonderful views and spent a total of three nights wild camping here. The fishing was not bad and seals were spotted as well as sea eagle (we were suddenly joined by a small group of twitchers who spent hours waiting for this bird to move. When it was still stood on the opposite shore after three hours, they decided it had more patience than they had and they left!!!)

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Fishing

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    Loch Scridain

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 28, 2006

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    Loch Scridain and Loch Beg
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    Loch Scridain is in the south west of the island and is a sea loch running from the Ardmeanach peninsula on the north shore to Pennygael at the head of it, where it turns a corner and becomes Loch Beg. Ben More presides over the scene.
    The A849 runs along it's south shore and the B8035 along the first few miles at it's head. As with a lot of places on Mull, there are not many places where you can park without occupying a passing place. There is one small parking spot that has a height barrier on it, infuriating.
    Loch Scridain has a salmon farm where large floating cages hold maturing fish as well as mussel farms, nearer Bunessan, where the shellfish grow on ropes suspended in the water. Many of the mussels end up in restaurants as far afield as Spain and France. These fish farms are a life-line employing many young people on Mull, thus helping to keep them in their home environment . Yes, they are a bit if a blot on the beautiful landscape but no doubt a necessity in today's modern age.

    This was the first place we free camped on Mull, on the B8035, as we had just arrived on the island and it was getting late. We ended up on the back of a large passing place, not causing any obstruction. We passed a very peaceful evening simply admiring the view and moved on the next morning. This wasn't as easy as it sounded as we needed to turn round to proceed in the opposite direction and this Nick only just managed to do , again in a passing place with an about 6 point turn!!!! and without the benefit of power steering.
    I would not recommend parking up for the night on the other shore, the main road, as it's the route to Fionnphort for Iona and coaches plough down this road at breakneck speed.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Fishing

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    Bunessan

    by nickandchris Written Aug 26, 2006

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    Central Bunessan
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    Not really a lot to do here but you'll find yourself stopping as there is actually a carpark and toilets. Admire the view of the inlet, spot the herons and then, the most exciting part is the fact there are a couple of general stores for groceries, a P.O., a charity shop and a fishing tackle shop!! There's also a hotel and a nice looking restaurant that serves daily seafood specials.
    Stock up on supplies, it may take a while as shops are few and far between. It took us about 15 mins to purchase some bread and milk and there was only one person ahead of us!
    On the way into the village is a memorial to the poetess Mary MacDonald who wrote the music for the famous hymn "Child in a Manger", known today as" Morning has Broken."
    At Bunessan there is also a recently opened Historical Centre, sponsored by the locals and is a collection of family histories and tales from the area. A great place to glean local information from it's knowledgeable volunteers.

    For those who are free camping there is an outside tap by the toilets.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Beaches
    • Museum Visits

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    Tobermory coloured houses

    by duncanlbrown Written Aug 30, 2005

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    this was October!
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    Just look at them.

    Then photograph them

    Then understand why the BBC brought some of their most average actors all the way from Glasgow to film a kiddie's programme "Balamory" here.

    And that explains why most of the tourists are only 3 ft tall!

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    Take a trip to Staffa

    by frank_delargy Updated Jan 23, 2005

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    approaching Fingals cave

    You can catch a boat from several places on Mull that will take you to the island of Staffa. Staffa is a wonderful creation of volcanic activity with 3 different layers. What you can easily see is the middle layer of some of the best basaltic pillars around with a layer of amorphous basalt on top.
    The island has many caves that have been carved out of the pillared basalt.
    When you arrive at the island, you can take some steps up to the top of the island which is grass covered and windblown.

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    Duart Castle

    by frank_delargy Updated Jan 23, 2005

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    from the web site

    This castle is the home of the Clan Maclean and has been for about 700 years. The MacLean's and the related clans have a gathering here quite frequently.
    It is a good castle to visit as you can explore the inside and outside and get great views from the ramparts.
    Inside you can visit the dungeons, and the great rooms within the castle. I particularly liked the nice winding stairways.
    Opening Times:
    Castle only: 1 April - 30 April: 1100-1600;
    1 May - 14 October: Daily: 1030 - 1800
    Adult £4.00 ; Child £2.00; Family ticket £10.00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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    check out the pillar lava formations

    by frank_delargy Updated Jan 21, 2005

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    potential VTers exploring the baltic lava.

    When you get off the boat you can go to the left across the pillars of lava and towards Fingals cave. There are tide pools along the way that are worth exploring.
    The columns of lava can be anything from 5 sided to 8 sided.. maybe more. There is a common belief that they are hexagonal and 6 sided may indeed be the most common.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

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    Look down .. explore the sea-land interface

    by frank_delargy Updated Jan 21, 2005

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    tide-pool

    All over the islands are wonderful little (and big) tide-pools with some fantastic sea creatures that you can just touch if you want to.
    Here you can see some lovely red anemones and some other creatures that I can't name.

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    Fingals Cave

    by frank_delargy Written Jan 11, 2005

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    inside Fingals cave

    The most famous of the caves on Staffa is Fingals cave. This is to a great extent due to the composer Mendelssohn, who was reported to have been so fascinated by the sounds of the waves in this particular cave that he went back home and wrote the Hebridean Overture. That overture is often called the Scottish Overture.
    The cave is quite big and you can park a boat in it in calm waters. You can also walk into it, but be very very careful.. if you fall, it will not be a good ending.

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    Climb up the steps to the top of Staffa.

    by frank_delargy Written Jan 11, 2005

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    Staffa meadows

    Look for the Puffin nests in the ground. In May you should be able to see lots of puffins flying around the island and bringing their catch back on shore into the nests.. holes in the ground. It is fantastic when you sit down next to a hole and a puffin flies about 6 inches past your head with a beak full of fish!

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Island of Mull Things to Do

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