Island of Mull Things to Do

  • Tobermory
    Tobermory
    by JessieLang
  • Distillery
    Distillery
    by JessieLang
  • Puffins on Lunga island
    Puffins on Lunga island
    by MikeBird

Best Rated Things to Do in Island of Mull

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    Tobermory Distillery

    by frank_delargy Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    from website

    One of my favorite distilleries to visit in Scotland is the one in Tobermory. I am partial to the flavor of their malts, but I also enjoyed the tour itself. It is a small distillery compared to the big names. It has been bought up by one of the larger Whisky manufacturers, Burns Stewart, but it seems to have retained it's charm. The original name for the distillery, Ledaig (pronounced Lea-chaig) is Gaelic, and means "safe haven". This probably refers to the very sheltered harbour that it is in, as opposed to the state of mind it puts you in :) Tobermory is the source of five Single Malts - Tobermory 10 years old, and Ledaig standard, Sherry Finish, 15 years old and 20 years old.
    Visitors Centre
    Open : Easter – October.
    Hours: Mon – Fri 10 am – 5pm
    Open : October – Easter.
    Hours: Tue & Thu 10 am – 5pm
    Other times by appointment.
    PS. Near the distillery is where you can some of the best views and photos of the town.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Luxury Travel
    • Food and Dining

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    Loch Scridain

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 28, 2006

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    Loch Scridain and Loch Beg
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    Loch Scridain is in the south west of the island and is a sea loch running from the Ardmeanach peninsula on the north shore to Pennygael at the head of it, where it turns a corner and becomes Loch Beg. Ben More presides over the scene.
    The A849 runs along it's south shore and the B8035 along the first few miles at it's head. As with a lot of places on Mull, there are not many places where you can park without occupying a passing place. There is one small parking spot that has a height barrier on it, infuriating.
    Loch Scridain has a salmon farm where large floating cages hold maturing fish as well as mussel farms, nearer Bunessan, where the shellfish grow on ropes suspended in the water. Many of the mussels end up in restaurants as far afield as Spain and France. These fish farms are a life-line employing many young people on Mull, thus helping to keep them in their home environment . Yes, they are a bit if a blot on the beautiful landscape but no doubt a necessity in today's modern age.

    This was the first place we free camped on Mull, on the B8035, as we had just arrived on the island and it was getting late. We ended up on the back of a large passing place, not causing any obstruction. We passed a very peaceful evening simply admiring the view and moved on the next morning. This wasn't as easy as it sounded as we needed to turn round to proceed in the opposite direction and this Nick only just managed to do , again in a passing place with an about 6 point turn!!!! and without the benefit of power steering.
    I would not recommend parking up for the night on the other shore, the main road, as it's the route to Fionnphort for Iona and coaches plough down this road at breakneck speed.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Iona

    by nickandchris Updated Sep 4, 2006

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    Looking to Iona
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    Iona is seperated from Mull by the mile wide Sound of Iona and is a mere 1.5 miles east to west and 3 miles from north to south.
    Access is from the small port of Finnphort on Mull, where you must leave your car, where ferries ply back and forth regularly. These are passenger only ferries as vehicles are discouraged from landing on Iona, there being only 3 miles of navigable road. The population of 100 or so is centred around Iona village. There are a few hotels and B&B places, as well as the odd shop and restaurant, but mostly it's farms and residential buildings. No camping is allowed on Iona.

    Most people journey to Iona to visit the monastery that St. Columba founded when he landed in 563 AD.. He had, in fact, banished himself to this island where he later introduced Christianity. There is the largest collection of Christian carved stones in Scotland here.

    There are beautiful white, sand beaches to walk to and enjoy, though during the daytime you'll be sharing them with the rest of the crowds. Iona is a very popular destination and only when the ferries stop running for the day does peace and quiet return to those lucky enough to have found accommodation.

    We opted to not go with the flow so didn't make the crossing to Iona. I had visited many years ago in my teens and remember walking in the pouring rain from one end of the island to the other to a most fantastic beach.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Religious Travel
    • Beaches

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    Fingals Cave

    by frank_delargy Written Jan 11, 2005

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    inside Fingals cave

    The most famous of the caves on Staffa is Fingals cave. This is to a great extent due to the composer Mendelssohn, who was reported to have been so fascinated by the sounds of the waves in this particular cave that he went back home and wrote the Hebridean Overture. That overture is often called the Scottish Overture.
    The cave is quite big and you can park a boat in it in calm waters. You can also walk into it, but be very very careful.. if you fall, it will not be a good ending.

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    Bunessan

    by nickandchris Written Aug 26, 2006

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    Central Bunessan
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    Not really a lot to do here but you'll find yourself stopping as there is actually a carpark and toilets. Admire the view of the inlet, spot the herons and then, the most exciting part is the fact there are a couple of general stores for groceries, a P.O., a charity shop and a fishing tackle shop!! There's also a hotel and a nice looking restaurant that serves daily seafood specials.
    Stock up on supplies, it may take a while as shops are few and far between. It took us about 15 mins to purchase some bread and milk and there was only one person ahead of us!
    On the way into the village is a memorial to the poetess Mary MacDonald who wrote the music for the famous hymn "Child in a Manger", known today as" Morning has Broken."
    At Bunessan there is also a recently opened Historical Centre, sponsored by the locals and is a collection of family histories and tales from the area. A great place to glean local information from it's knowledgeable volunteers.

    For those who are free camping there is an outside tap by the toilets.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Beaches
    • Museum Visits

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    Craignure

    by nickandchris Updated Jul 23, 2012

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    Old jetty, Craignure.2012.
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    Craignure is the main ferry port for Mull, with the larger ferries calling here. Don't expect a lot, as apart from the ferry quay, really the place is little more than a row of houses. There is a tourist information office, toilets, a pub with accommodation serving food and a few other places to eat. A few B&B places and the campsite which also has self catering "tents". There's also a general store and a Post Office. Petrol is available, at a premium!! What more could you want??
    Coaches wait to collect people disembarking from the ferry and cruise boats and whisk them away to various destinations, including Iona and Duart and Torosay Castles.
    The small, very short, little railway to Torosay Castle runs from Craignure, but it's not that regular, so check before planning your itinery.(This appears to have closed now and on our recent visit, I didn't see the station - possibly gone?)
    Torosay Castle is a 1.5 mile walk away with it's magnificent gardens and Duart Castle another couple of miles on. Needeless to say, we didn't visit either but if we ever return to Mull, I would like to see at least Torosay gardens.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Camping
    • Cruise

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    Take the Ferry to get there .. how else??

    by frank_delargy Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Dennis & I on the Fishnish Ferry

    There are 3 ways to get to Mull by ferry.
    Oban - Craignure
    Kilchoan - Tobermory
    and my favorite Lochaline - Fishnish
    Getting there (and back) is part of the adventure of Mull. On one particular trip it was so windy, we couldn't stand up straight!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Cruise

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    Duart Castle

    by frank_delargy Updated Jan 23, 2005

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    from the web site

    This castle is the home of the Clan Maclean and has been for about 700 years. The MacLean's and the related clans have a gathering here quite frequently.
    It is a good castle to visit as you can explore the inside and outside and get great views from the ramparts.
    Inside you can visit the dungeons, and the great rooms within the castle. I particularly liked the nice winding stairways.
    Opening Times:
    Castle only: 1 April - 30 April: 1100-1600;
    1 May - 14 October: Daily: 1030 - 1800
    Adult £4.00 ; Child £2.00; Family ticket £10.00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Loch Na Keal

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 29, 2006

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    That's us.....Loch Na Keal
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    A very picturesque sea loch, a mere three miles from Salen to the head of the loch at Gruline. It is dominated by Ben More, Mull's highest mountain (3,170 ft.)
    From Gruline, take a left turning that brings you out on the south shore of Loch Na Keal. It's a B. road and narrow but has plenty of passing places. Watch out for cattle and sheep on the road as they roam freely.
    This road has quite a few grassy areas to pull off onto, unusual for Mull, and gives ample opportunity for wild camping.
    The road proceeds to the end of the loch, hugging the coastline and passing the Isle of Eorsa. It then narrows right down and hugs the sheer cliff face for a distance, climbing along the way.A real sense of being hemmed in!!! After passing the end of the loch, with more small islands dotted about, the road turns inland and so on to Loch Scridain where it joins the A849.
    Taking the road from Gruline, following the north shore of Loch Scridain, you are once again rewarded with magnificent views looking back over Ben More. Along this road, not far from Gruline, is the basic farm camp site mentioned under accommodation tips. After the campsite, there is a sign forbidding camping for 6 miles or so. This route twists and turns it's way up above the loch and takes you to the left hand turn to the tiny passenger ferry for the Isle of Ulva, at the open sea end of the loch. The route then proceeds northwards along Loch Tuarth, offering excellent views to Ulva.

    We fell in love with this loch with it's wonderful views and spent a total of three nights wild camping here. The fishing was not bad and seals were spotted as well as sea eagle (we were suddenly joined by a small group of twitchers who spent hours waiting for this bird to move. When it was still stood on the opposite shore after three hours, they decided it had more patience than they had and they left!!!)

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches
    • Fishing

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    check out the pillar lava formations

    by frank_delargy Updated Jan 21, 2005

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    potential VTers exploring the baltic lava.

    When you get off the boat you can go to the left across the pillars of lava and towards Fingals cave. There are tide pools along the way that are worth exploring.
    The columns of lava can be anything from 5 sided to 8 sided.. maybe more. There is a common belief that they are hexagonal and 6 sided may indeed be the most common.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

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    Explore the Treshnish islands

    by frank_delargy Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Jessica on Treshnish

    Just beyond Staffa is a group of islands called the Treshnish islands. Some of the boats that go to Staffa will also take you here. The islands abound with seabirds on the cliffs and hills and have some wonderful walks. We didn't have enough time on the island to do enough exploring.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Whale Watching
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Take a trip to Staffa

    by frank_delargy Updated Jan 23, 2005

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    approaching Fingals cave

    You can catch a boat from several places on Mull that will take you to the island of Staffa. Staffa is a wonderful creation of volcanic activity with 3 different layers. What you can easily see is the middle layer of some of the best basaltic pillars around with a layer of amorphous basalt on top.
    The island has many caves that have been carved out of the pillared basalt.
    When you arrive at the island, you can take some steps up to the top of the island which is grass covered and windblown.

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    Climb up the steps to the top of Staffa.

    by frank_delargy Written Jan 11, 2005

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    Staffa meadows

    Look for the Puffin nests in the ground. In May you should be able to see lots of puffins flying around the island and bringing their catch back on shore into the nests.. holes in the ground. It is fantastic when you sit down next to a hole and a puffin flies about 6 inches past your head with a beak full of fish!

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    Do not miss out on the ferry ride, get outside!

    by bicycle_girl Written Oct 16, 2003

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    Duart Castle

    From Oban to Craignure, you will see lots of beautiful sceneries, like Oban from the water, Kerrera Island, and the ile of Mull approach. You will have lots of opportunities to see Duart castle, which is best seen from the water to my opinion. So forget about hiding in the cabin, dress up and get outside and have fabulous views.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Photography
    • Road Trip

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    Visit Torosay Castle

    by bicycle_girl Updated Oct 16, 2003

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    Torosay Castle

    Torosay castle is a couple of miles away from the Craignure ferry landing. There is a little train going from the ferry to the castle if you don't have other mean of transportation. You can visit the gardens only like I did or also visit the castle inside for 6 pounds. The gardens were awesome and provided me with great view of the architecture of the castle.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Castles and Palaces

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Island of Mull Things to Do

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