Loch Lomond Things to Do

  • View from the Rest
    View from the Rest
    by Flying.Scotsman
  • A lonely, but often photographed cottage
    A lonely, but often photographed cottage
    by Flying.Scotsman
  • Another mountain view
    Another mountain view
    by Flying.Scotsman

Best Rated Things to Do in Loch Lomond

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    Explore the Loch from many locations

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 11, 2009

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    It had been a very long number of years since I last saw Loch Lomond when we went to see a Runrig Concert on the shores at Balloch. In those far off days there were no visitor centres you just parked in a field and hoped you would be able to get the car back out. All has changed since the area became Scotland's first National Park with lots of parking lots and visitor centres. We visited the 'Bonnie Banks' from Firkin Point, Luss and Tarbet where the loch narrows and great views can be seen towards the head of the loch and the best views of Ben Lomond from Luss. Loch Lomond has the largest surface area of fresh water of any Loch or Lake the United Kingdom. The Loch is 24 miles long and five miles wide and at its deepest point is some 600 feet deep.
    On the Loch there are approximately 38 Islands, some of them inhabited and there is even a Hotel on one at Inchmurrin.
    The Loch crossed the Highland Boundary Fault and the scenery here is unusual depicting both the highlands and the Lowlands of Scotland. Here you can find around 200 species of birds and over 25% of Britain's wild plants flourish around here. We had a great time here walking along the shore by the old road and as you can see from the last photo Cuileann had a blast with some drift wood and very cold water!

    Firkin Point Luss Cuileann at Firkin Point Firkin Point the old road Luss
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    Luss Parish Church

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 9, 2009

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    There has been a Church here in Luss since 510 AD founded by the Celtic Saint Kessog, his name in Gaelic is no surprise, he is known as MacKessog the Monk who introduced Christianity to Luss. Many pilgrims followed this Saint to Luss and the Church here was once linked to Glasgow Cathedral. The present Church in Luss was built around 1875 with major renovations both inside and out in 2001. The cost of the renovations was £900,000 with the bulk of the money coming from Historic Scotland - Boy they do a good job in preservation! I particularly liked the lychgate where funeral processions could stop to avoid inclement weather, the round squat tower was interesting and the tri fold window of the Holy Trinity held great significance to me. The surrounding Kirk Yard with its many graves pre dating the present Church is awesome to stroll around and absorb some history.

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    Travelling through the Ben's

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 11, 2009

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    Ben Lomond is the most southerly of Scotland's Munroes and one of the smallest at a height of 974 metres 3,200 feet. Its name in Scottish Gaelic is Laomainn which translates as Beacon Peak. Ben Lomond although small in stature can be seen from the mighty Ben Nevis a mere forty miles away! It is one of Scotland's most popular mountains, easily accessible from Glasgow and central Scotland nicknamed 'Glasgow Hill' down sized as only Glasgow humour can do! If you travel south from Argyll the road towards the 'Ben' highlights some amazing mountain scenery in the shape of the Arrochar Alps. What a great surprise to find we in Scotland not only have Munroes but we also have the Alps on Glasgow's door step! What a picture these blue alps made.

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    Beautiful Stained Glass

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 11, 2009

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    The interior of Luss Parish Church has a restful and calming atmosphere. The Minister, the Reverand Doctor Dane Sherrad, personally welcomes all visitors and tells some history of his Church. He told us of the many Weddings he had conducted below the 'Good Shepherd' window, joining together people from all corners of the world. You can see some on the web link which is fascinating in its self, this website also broadcasts the Sunday Service live to the world. I particularly liked the many stained glass windows, my favourite was 'I to the hills will lift my eyes' very fitting given the glorious location of Luss on Loch Lomond.

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    Luss Village

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 10, 2009

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    The pretty cottages which line Luss streets were originally build in the late eighteenth century to house workers from the cotton mills and slate quarries. The houses were build using local slate, which is very colourful in shades of pinks, blues, greys, cream and apricot. Luss became conservation village when the houses which had fallen into disrepair were totally renovated. The gardens are lush with a myriad of plants and flowers. Only around one hundred people live in these streets, at least one has a sense of humour. I had to smile when I saw the sign on a gate 'Beware Killer Cats' Well if you had a horde of tourist tripping by your door wouldn't you like to provide a warning?

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    Walking the banks of the river

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 10, 2009

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    We had a lovely sunny walk along the river bank. Early Spring saw most of the trees still bare but they did provide nice reflections in the river and the sweet yellow primroses were in bloom. We crossed the aptly named 'Sappers' Bridge' The old bridge had been destroyed by a flood, the Royal Engineers who were at that time based in Osnabruck in Germany, came to Luss to build the bridge for free. Material was provided by Babcock Marine. It took the troops three weeks to build the bridge and it was opened in their presence on 2nd. June 2006. I loved the little plaque on the bridge which read -
    Now do thy speedy utmost Meg
    and win the key-stone o the brig
    There at them thou thy tail may loss
    A running stream they dare na cross
    Until they built the bridge at Luss
    'In the spirit of Rabbie Burns' a little misquoting from 'Tam O Shanter'

    Reflections River Luss Sappers' Bridge Wild Primroses
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    The Glebe

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 11, 2009

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    A Glebe is a sizeable piece of land given to Ministers by the Church of Scotland who ministered in rural areas. In past time they kept sheep or cattle here and grew some crops to eek out their stipend. In these modern times the Glebes still exist, my own Parish Church rents out the Glebe for local farmers for grazing of sheep. Not so in Luss, the land here has been created as a pilgrims pathway. The project was started in 2006 and is due to be completed in 2010. Young people gather here from all over the world to work on this project, planting trees, laying plaques, clearing the old wood land and staying in the accommodation provided by the Church free of charge. Reading the inscription on one of the tiles left me feeling very humble, it had been written by a young girl from Poland - she wrote 'I am not afraid when God is going with me Yes the young trees will grow along with the old oak wood, the fallen trees will be home to insects and animals and provide kindling for barbecues to stop people cutting down living trees - a great example of man's humanity to man - Well done Luss - the power of sharing is indeed strong in your village.

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    Rest and Be Thankful

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 12, 2009

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    No one ever said more honest words than 'Rest and be thankful' on the A83 between Loch Lomond and Tarbert you will be glad to pull off the hectic A83 such a busy road with only two directions of travel and everyone in a hurry = they take no prisoners here its evey man for himselfl Oh how I hate this cut and thrust of road travel! On the way south towards Loch Lomond you cannot enter the peace which lies at Rest and be thankful - it would be a dangerous manoeuvre with your car to cross to the right. This place is not sign posted from your journey South anyway. Travelling North you do get to stop and admire this all encompassing magnificent scenery of the old drove road. This road you see below was built on the valley floor and leads from Arroch then climbs through Glen Goe . The road was built by the military in 1743 and is an amazing sight. If I travelled this old drove road, perhaps with a horse and cart, I would certainly rest and be thankful. Oh and you won't be alone here, it is a huge car and bus park with nice picnic area. People tend to come and go quickly here. I took Cuileann's lead and became like her 'the master of all she surveyed!

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    Cruise the Loch

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 10, 2009

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    Five vessels sail on Loch Lomond daily from May until October. Winter sailings are also available by telephone arrangement. The cruise day starts at 11.00 am and the last sailing is 17.00. Prices vary depending on your choice of cruise, there are three The West Highland Way Rambler - The Inversnaid Experience and The Rob Roy Discovery. We were on our way home when we stopped to see the boats, so sadly didn't have time to take a cruise. I had to smile at the safety notice = If you don't like to wear a life vest - raise your hand! I will definately be back in the National Park and one day I will sail Loch Lomond complete with life vest I hope!

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    BALLOCH CASTLE

    by hevbell Written Apr 18, 2004

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    If you stop in the town of Balloch then take a quick walk up to the Castle which has views over the Loch. I'm not sure if its actually open to the public or not though or its just the grounds. I only stopped in Balloch to visit the shop for some refreshments but when I came across the road up to the castle I just had to have a quick look!

    Balloch castle
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    DUCK BAY

    by hevbell Written Apr 18, 2004

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    One of the first places you pass on the way up the left bank of Loch Lomond is Duck Bay - a hotel and marina. The views from there are magnificent on a clear day as you get a real panorama of the loch where its quite wide. Enlarge the photo to see the view properly! This was taken on a sunny February day

    Duck Bay

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    Visit Balloch Country Park and Castle

    by vichatherly Written Dec 30, 2004

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    A good place to breathe in the fresh air after a long days drive.

    The country park itself is 200 acres of woodland, parkland and ornamental gardens with pathways which go down to the shores of Loch Lomond. There are lots of corners for quiet picnics and the visitor centre has a small exhibition on the plants and animals which can be seen in the area.

    Balloch Castle
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    Visit the village of Luss

    by GypsyBessie Written Sep 14, 2003

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    A real must is to visit Luss, a small village on the Banks of Loch Lomond. It is extremely picturesque and the cottages are so quaint and pretty, especially during the summer as you can see from the pictures.

    The village was actually used as the set for a TV programme by the name of "Take The High Road" which was screened a few years ago.

    Cottage in Luss
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    TARBET

    by hevbell Written Apr 18, 2004

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    Another place where you can take boat trips from and a lovely spot to stop for lunch! The loch is a lot narrower at this point but that just brings the stunning scenery closer!

    If you want to continue to drive up the side of the Loch you have to turn off the road as the A82 continues to the right while the "main" road becomes the A83 heading towards Inverary and Lochgilphead.

    Tarbet Loch Lomond
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    Stirling Castle

    by geanster Updated Aug 19, 2003

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    Stirling Castle was the first castle I'd ever experienced. We really enjoyed roaming the grounds, pretending to be prisoners, sitting on cannons, etc. The famous William Wallace also spent time fighting at this castle and there is a memorial monument on a hilltop 2 miles away. I can't help thinking about Mel Gibson and the bloody scenes in Braveheart based on the life and battles of William Wallace!

    You can buy tickets at the castle or you have the option of buying your tickets online at the historic scotland website.

    Opening Times:
    Open All Year Seven Days A Week. April To September 9.30am To 6.00pm. October To March 9.30am To 5.00pm. Last Ticket Sold 45 Minutes Before Closing.

    Admission Charges:
    Adult £7.50 Child £2.00 Reduced £5.50.
    Please note: Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

    From the site Historic Scotland site: "Without doubt one of the grandest of all Scottish castles, both in its situation on a commanding rock outcrop and in its architecture. The Great Hall and the Gatehouse of James IV, the marvellous Palace of James V, the Chapel Royal of James VI and the artillery fortifications of the 16th to 18th centuries are all of outstanding interest. The views from the castle rock are spectacular. The Great Hall has recently been restored to how it would have looked around 1500. Displays on castle’s history, medieval kitchen and attractive café."

    For more information about the Wallace Monument: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/stirling/wallace/index.html

    Stirling Castle
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