Oban Things to Do

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    Oban War Memorial
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    Oban Distillery
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Most Recent Things to Do in Oban

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    Dunstaffnage Castle

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    Dunstaffnage Castle is located 5 miles north of Oban and was the original Kingdom of the Scots. Built upon an immense rock , the shape of the wall was altered to accommodate the odd shape.

    The castle was a MacDougall fortress until 1309 when Robert the Bruce seized it in the name of the crown and appointed the Campbell clan as its innate keepers. The castle is now looked after by Historic Scotland who is responsible for more than 30 historic properties. There is said that there is a ghost that haunts the castle wearing in a green dress.

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    McCaig's Tower

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    On Pulpit Hill overlooking the bay is McCaig’s Tower (also known as McCaigs Folly), a replica of Rome’s Coliseum.

    The tower was built between 1897 and 1900 as a monument to the McCaig family. It was also built in an endeavour to provide employment for the men of the town. There is a short steep walk to the tower but the views over Oban and the bay are worth it. It wasn’t a really clear day when we were there but apparently you can see over to Mull when it is.

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    Benedictine Nunnery

    by ghweeh Written Aug 15, 2006

    My first encounters of a ruin in Scotland. It was founded in 1203 by Reginald MacDonald of Islay, Lord of the Isles. It has been ruinous for nearly three hundred years and the peace enjoyed by the nuns could still be appreciated in the lovely gardens of the cloister. There was also a Nunnery Museum situated in St Ronan’s Chapel, just to the north of the ruined church. The Chapel has been re-routed to house many interesting carved stones that were formerly scattered about the surrounding area.

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    Iona Abbey

    by ghweeh Written Aug 15, 2006

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    One of Scotland’s most historic and sacred sites founded by St Columba and his Irish followers in AD 563. After having enjoyed over 200 years of tranquility, Iona was raided by Norsemen and all the religious buildings were later broken up. The abbey and monastic buildings were restored in 1938. In the burial ground, lies the remains of over 60 Scottish, Irish and Norse Kings.

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    Isle of Iona

    by ghweeh Written Aug 15, 2006

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    Last island of the day via ferry from Fionnphort at the south of Mull to Isle of Iona. It was separated from Mull by about a mile of water. More thatched cottages overlooking the shores. It was said that Columba set foot in this island at Port a’Churaich, in AD 563, with his followers from Ireland. We have a good weather, with warm sunshine as we strolled along some of the most beautiful coast, ruins, very green grasslands….

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    Fingal’s Cave

    by ghweeh Written Aug 15, 2006

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    A ferry took us to this uninhabited island famous for its basaltic formations, distinctive stepped columns created by massive flow of the lava volcanic eruptions cooled many millions years ago. The entrance of the Fingal’s Cave was a narrow ledge of columns access by one person. The cave was gloomy and damp; which discourage me from stepping inside. For I tremble with fear even when walking around outside the cave as I wary of slipping off from the rocks.

    But I enjoyed my walked on the grassy flat top of the island where the view looking out was simply breathtaking. My state of mind has never been so peaceful…

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    McCaig Tower

    by ghweeh Written Aug 15, 2006

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    McCaig’s Tower was a replica of the Colosseum of Rome. A banker called John McCaig had it built between 1897 and 1900s as a memorial to his family and to provide employment for the townsmen. It was a steep climb to the top of the hill, but there were a couple of benches where you could sit and get your breath back. It seems that the tower is nearly one hundred years old. This was the first tourist attraction we visited in Oban…or in Scotland!

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    Oban’s Tourist Information Centre

    by ghweeh Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    I know that this might sound crazy....but this was really the first place we visited when arrivng in Oban, to source for information. As we had no idea what to do, where to go, what to see and whatnots… Not forgetting books and postcards shopping… I bought a couple of books about Iona and Mull here.

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    Loch Etive Cruises

    by stevezero Written May 29, 2006

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    Loch Etive Cruises

    The "Anne of Etive" operates from its pier just north of Bonawe Furnace outside of the village of Taynuilt at the western end of the Pass of Brander.
    As the three-hour cruise heads northeast ever deeper into the mountains, passengers see some of western central Scotland’s highest mountains up close—Ben Cruachan (3,695 feet) and Ben Starav (3,538 feet). Passengers also probably observe herds of deer grazing along the shore, a soaring (or nesting) eagle, and, most improbably, colonies of seals on rocky islets in the loch. These seals somehow worked their way deeply inland from the Atlantic, past the Falls of Lora, and into the Scottish Highlands interior.

    90MIN CRUISE 3-HOUR
    CRUISES CRUISES
    ADULTS £ 6.00 £11.00

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    Dunstaffnage Castle

    by stevezero Updated May 29, 2006

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    Dunstaffnage Castle
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    Once the of the original Kingdom of the Scots, it was to here that The Stone of Destiny was brought over from Ireland via Iona. In the mid-ninth century with the Norsemen attacking from the west, the seat of power was moved to Scone, near Perth. The Stone was used at the coronations of subsequent Scottish kings until it was taken by Edward I to Westminster Abbey in 1296. The Stone was returned to Scotland on Saint Andrews' Day, 30 November 1996 and can now be seen in Edinburgh Castle.
    Dunstaffnage Castle looks square and impenetrable with round towers. A MacDougall stronghold until 1309, it was seized by Robert the Bruce who then appointed the Campbell clan as its hereditary keepers in the name of the Crown.
    Bonne Prince Charlie's heroine, Flora MacDonald, was held prisoner here for a short time in 1746.

    In the care of Historic Scotland -
    Admission Charge - Adults £3.00

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    Dunstaffnage Castle - Gatehouse

    by stevezero Updated May 29, 2006

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    Dunstaffnage Castle - Gatehouse
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    Dunstaffnage Castle consists of parts from many centuries dating back to the 12th. The present gatehouse was added in the 1600's. Unfortunately, they don't tell you that this part of the castle is still in private hands, and your admission charge does not get you into here! So like us you probably have to make do with peering through the windows, They could use a good window cleaner too....

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    Bonawe Iron Furnace

    by stevezero Updated May 29, 2006

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    Bonawe Iron Furnace
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    Bonawe Iron Furnace, a relic from an industrial past that produced anything up to 700 tons of iron per year from 1753 to 1876, Strange to find an industrial site seemingly in the middle of nowhere. The answer revolves around the problem of transporting the fuel. Until the widespread use of coke in the late 1700s, iron furnaces depended for fuel on charcoal. And the large scale production of charcoal needed an awful lot of trees. Still worse, transporting the charcoal was a hugely wasteful business.
    The approach adopted by the English iron masters who ran the business was to take the iron to the source of the fuel, the iron ore actually coming to this site from Cumbria.
    There are still quite a lot of the original buidings to be seen and the site is set in a picturesque setting by Loch Etive.

    In the care of Historic Scotland
    Admission Charge - Adults £3.50

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    Dunstaffnage Chapel

    by stevezero Written May 29, 2006

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    Dunstaffnage Chapel
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    A short walk south west from the main castle buildings is the chapel, built at the end of the 1200s and extended in 1740. In the ruins, the remains of the paired windows in the chancel show a high standard of workmanship. The eastern extension to the chapel forms the burial aisle to the Campbells of Dunstaffnage, whose monuments are amongst those still standing within the shell of the building.

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    Connel Bridge

    by stevezero Written May 29, 2006

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    Connel Bridge. Oban
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    Joining the settlements of Connel and North Connel, the Connel Bridge lies across the entrance to Loch Etive. Built in 1901, it is the second largest cantilever bridge in Britain, bearing more than a passing resemblence to the Forth Rauil Bridge. It was constructed originally to convey the railway to Ballachulish but the bridge was modified in 1914 to allow use by both rail and road traffic, until the railway branch closed in 1966. Owing to its narrow carriageway, traffic signals operate allowing vehicles to cross the bridge in only one direction at a time.

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    Fishing Boats

    by stevezero Written May 27, 2006

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    Fishing Boats
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    Oban has a long seafaring heritage, and fishing was once vital, there are still a few working fishing boats to be seen in the harbour, but these days tourism is much more important. Boats can however be hired for fishing trips and charters.

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Oban Things to Do

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