Tobermory Things to Do

  • Duart Castle
    Duart Castle
    by SallyM
  • View from Torosay Castle to Duart Castle
    View from Torosay Castle to Duart Castle
    by SallyM
  • Aros Castle
    Aros Castle
    by SallyM

Most Recent Things to Do in Tobermory

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    Old Byre Heritage Centre

    by SallyM Updated Apr 24, 2009

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    The children's play area at the Old Byre

    If you can brave the narrow roads for 8 miles or so to drive (or cycle) from Tobermory to Dervaig, you can visit the Old Byre Heritage Centre.

    Downstairs is a tea-room and shop, with a children's play area outside. The children's play area in the barn is painted with a representation of Tobermory harbour.

    We can recommend the cloutie dumpling, but you really only need one between two!

    Upstairs is an exhibition area with a small museum and film show (admission £4).

    Displays include 'Miniature Mull through the Ages' and Mull wildlife and there are 30 minute films on the story of Mull (shown on Thursdays and Saturdays) and Mull wildlife (shown on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays).

    Open April-October, Wednesdays to Sundays and Bank Holiday Mondays.

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    • Museum Visits
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    Duart Castle

    by SallyM Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    Duart Castle

    Duart Castle is not in Tobermory, but close to the ferry terminal in Craignure - you get a wonderful view of it from the ferry.

    Unlike nearby Torosay Castle, this one is a genuine medieval castle, but it was restored in 1912 by Sir Fitzroy Maclean, chief of the Clan Maclean. The keep was built in the fourteenth century.

    Among the rooms open to visitors are the Edwardian kitchen and pantry, the dungeons where officers of Tobermory’s Spanish galleon were imprisoned, the state bedroom and dressing room (also adjoining bathroom with incredibly large washbasin). There is an exhibition on the Clan Maclean at the top of the keep.

    There is a nice tea-room with home-made cakes.

    The Castle is open from April to mid-October. Admission costs £5.30. There is a car park, or a coach runs from the Craignure ferry terminal.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
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    • Family Travel

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    Aros Castle

    by SallyM Written Apr 23, 2009

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    Aros Castle
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    Aros, on the narrow neck of Mull, was once the most importance place on the island of Mull and the administrative centre. The castle, which dates from the 13th century, was probably built by the MacDougalls of Lorn.

    For 230 years from the defeat of King Haakon of Norway at the battle of Largs in 1263 the Western Isles and seaboard formed a semi-autonomous state within the kingdom of Scotland, the Lordship of the Isles. During the Lordship Aros was a residence and seat of government of the dominant clan. After the ending of the Lordship (the estates and titles of the Lords of the Isles were forfeited to the Scottish crown in 1493) the castle fell to the MacLeans who in turn were ousted by the clan Campbell.

    Today, the castle is just a picturesque ruin. There is no admission charge. There is a signposted circular walk route around the site.

    There is a layby on the main road where you can park, or I believe you can walk from Aros Mains.

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    Torosay Castle

    by SallyM Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    Torosay Castle entrance
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    This is not actually in Tobermory, but it's only about 40 minutes away by car, and is just over a mile from the ferry terminal in Craignure.

    It's more of a Victorian country home than a castle as such - it's only about 150 years old, having been built in 1858. It was designed by arrchitect David Bryce who also designed the Bank of Scotland building on the Mound in Edinburgh, and Fettes College.

    Torosay is still used as a family home, and you can really appreciate this as you wander round inside. There are no official guides or room stewards, just a notice welcoming you and inviting you to wander round the principal rooms. The notices which tell you about each room are written in a very friendly, chatty style, and visitors are even allowed to sit on the chairs, if they wish.

    Two rooms have displays about David Guthrie James and his adventurous life which included sailing one of the last windjammers, an escape from P.O.W camp and polar exploration. He was also the subject of the television programme 'This is Your Life' and you can look at the big red book.

    The gardens are beautiful, with Italianate terraces, views to Duart Castle, and an oriental garden. There is also an adventure playground for children.

    The tea room provides delicious light lunches and homemade cakes. I visited at Easter and cannot recommend the Simnel cake too highly.

    Torosay Castle is open daily from April to October 10.30 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. Admission £6.50.

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    • Castles and Palaces

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    Mull Museum

    by SallyM Written Apr 20, 2009

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    Mull Museum, Tobermory

    The Mull Museum in Tobermory crams a great deal of information into a very small space. They could have a room three times the size and it would still be full.

    Displays include the geology of the island; prehistory including Standing Stones, Duns and Brochs; the visit of Johnson and Boswell; the wreck of a Spanish galleon from the Armada fleet; the arrival of a ship from Newfoundland which had been blown off course across the Atlantic; the planned development of Tobermory in the nineteenth century as a fishing port; crafting, farming and other trades; the village school, etc.

    Open from Easter until the end of October, Monday to Friday 10am to 4pm.

    Admission is free.

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    • Backpacking

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    Internet access in Tobermory

    by SallyM Written Apr 19, 2009

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    Free wifi connections are available in the cafe of Tobermory Chocolate in Main Street and the cafe of the An Tobar Arts Centre.

    The cafe 'Posh Nosh' also has a sign up advertising internet access, but I didn't actually try it so I can't vouch for this.

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    • School Holidays
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Tobermory Things to Do

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