Perth Things to Do

  • Dull day. Sorry.
    Dull day. Sorry.
    by iaint
  • Security guard?
    Security guard?
    by iaint
  • in autumn sun
    in autumn sun
    by iaint

Most Recent Things to Do in Perth

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    Scone Palace

    by Drever Written Feb 8, 2014

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    Scone Palace near Perth, Scotland
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    Bruce’s position was desperate; he had killed another claimant to the throne. He acted quickly. Borrowed robes and a substitute circlet of plain gold as a crown he had himself crowned at the Abby of Scone on 25 March 1306 in defiance of Edward I of England who claimed feudal rights over Scotland. Superstitious unease abounded at the absence of the Stone of Destiny for traditionally Scottish kings sat on it when crowned. Edward had removed it 10 years earlier as a token of conquest. Bruce's act would bring Edward's army north once more. After years of conflict the Battle of Bannockburn cleared the English king out of Scotland and it was to be a Scottish king who eventually ruled over both countries.

    It was Kenneth MacAlpin, the first king of the Scots, who in 838 brought the Stone of Destiny to Moot Hill at Scone in the year 838. This identified with both Jacob’s Pillow at Bethel and the Stone of Destiny at Tara in Ireland. Since then it was the Coronation Chair for Scottish kings. The last Scottish king crowned here was Charles II in 1651.

    The first recorded Scottish parliaments were at Scone. Despite its historic setting, the splendid castellated gothic building in red sandstone we see today dates from 1802. English architect William Atkinson built it on to the remains of the old Abbey of Scone. Scone Palace has now been the family home of the Earls of Mansfield for 400 years.

    A replica replaces the Stone of Scone. Its position in front of the picturesque medieval chapel on the Moot Hill attracts many visitors in search of Scotland's heritage. In 1996 the real Stone, which had placed in under Coronation Chair in Westminster Abbey returned to the people of Scotland and is now on view in Edinburgh Castle.

    Scone Palace stands in 100 acres of stylish grounds bordering a further 300 acres of attractive parklands, which host major events each year. The beautifully laid out gardens at Scone are worth seeing. Take a stroll past the Mercat Cross and through the site of a medieval village attached to the Abbey. There is a beech hedge maze, a pinetum planted in 1848 and long borders of flowers and mature trees.

    Our visit to the Palace was memorable. Displays include the 1st Earl of Mansfield's collection of porcelain, housed in the library. Assembled in the Dining Room are collection of 17th, 18th and 19th century hand-carved ivory statues and 19th century bronzes. Two stuffed brown bears in the Inner Hall unfortunately attract attention from the two carved oak fireplaces. In the Long Gallery, at the end of which is a 17th century organ are the most magnificent items on display. These are the Vernis Martin - gold-mounted papier mache objets d'art once owned by King Louis XV of France.

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    Balvaird Castle

    by iaint Written Nov 4, 2012
    in autumn sun

    This is a castle dating from the 1500s. The tower part is intact, but the surrounding buildings are ruined.

    It's located about 10 miles south of the city, on top of a hill. Great views.

    You have to pre-book if you want to see the interior - check Historic Scotland's website. Otherwise, you're free to walk up from the car park and wander about at will.

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    Scone Palace

    by iaint Updated Nov 4, 2012
    Dull day. Sorry.
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    Pronounced "Scoon"!

    This is probably the top attraction in Perth. People talk about castles lurking round every corner in Scotland (true) but its the same with palaces.

    This one was the coronation place for Scottish kings (before the union of the crowns with England, of course). Macbeth, Robert the Bruce and Charles II were crowned there.

    It was the capital of Pictavia from the 5th century onwards. (Picts were the people the Romans built Hadrian's Wall to keep out of their empire).

    I've been round the place once, and I plan on going back. Allow half a day. Open all day every day in the summer. Check website for up to date info.

    Great gardens as well. Take a picnic!

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    Branklyn Gardens

    by zizkov Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Alpine
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    Small gardens run by the National Trust of Scotland.

    Quite a variety in its small space, it was originally the private gardens of a couple, who kept extending it, to around two acres, and bequeathed it to the NTS.

    Worth a look, though entry is, I feel, very expensive at £5 (£4 concs), especially in Autumn where there is not so much of immediate visual impact (ie a lot more greenery than pretty flowers).

    Open Good Friday to end October.

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    Kinross House

    by stevezero Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Kinross House, Perth

    Kinross house lies on the banks of Lochleven and was built by Sir William Bruce of Balcaskie in 1690.
    This involved the relocation of parts of the town still on the headland, and significant development immediately outside the gates on the west side of the estate. Kinross House is now accessed from a side street in Kinross and through its gates the visitor can catch a distant glimpse of the first major house in Scotland not built as a castle.

    The house itself is a private residence and not open to the public

    The gardens are open April to September
    Admission Charge £2,50

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    whisky tasting

    by iaint Updated Dec 31, 2008
    getting in the mood?

    A guided tour of the Blair Athol Distillery, followed by a taste of the real thing!

    The distillery is part of the Diageo multinational, so don't go thinking this is some cute cottage industry. 98% of its production goes into the Bell's brand blended whisky and the rest is bottled and sold as a single malt (all these technicalities will be explained to you).

    Check in advance for the guided tour timings. If it's important to you, ask if production will actually be taking place when you want to visit. It was not when we were there, due to Christmas holidays.

    The tour takes 45 minutes and costs £5 per adult (December 08). However we were given vouchers to take £3 off the purchase of any single malt from the gift shop. At that time a bottle of Blair Athol cost about £30.

    The distillery is at the south end of the town, and is well signposted in the town.

    However, 2 points to remember to avoid confusion
    - it is not in Blair Athol, which is a village to the north of Pitlochry
    - the town has 2 other distilleries, so do not mix it up with (for example) the Edradour Distillery.

    I've been on other distillery tours, and they are all pretty similar. The products are not, however! At one, we were able to sample 3 different single malts all from the same distillery but different ages. Blair Athol only has the one 12 year old malt.

    Good value, I would say, especially if you can walk or take the train (or otherwise arrange to be able to enjoy the free dram).

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    horse racing

    by iaint Updated Jul 3, 2008
    parade ring
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    Great setting, close to town; good value; friendly atmosphere.

    I've been several times and enjoyed it apart from the time it rained!

    It runs National Hunt meetings (steeplechases and hurdles) in spring, summer & autumn, whereas that is usually associated with winter racing.

    Admission is £15 (free for u16s) plus you need a racecard (£3).

    The course is celebrating its centenary this year (2008). Its located in the grounds of Scone Palace. It has won the "Best in the North" award 8 times in the last 10 years. Racing Post has described it as ... "a little piece of heaven". Presumably the reporter had backed a few winners that day!

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    • Casino and Gambling
    • Horse Riding

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    watch the river overflow

    by iaint Written Dec 11, 2006
    its cold too!
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    Take a break from Christmas shopping on a Sunday morning (oops, its 11 December and almost nothing done yet). Head for River Tay and see how high it is. Probably flooding upstream, after a month of wind and rain. Worse predicted.

    Looks scary!

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    • Water Sports

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    Kinnoul Hill and forest

    by zizkov Updated Oct 15, 2005

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    Kinnoull Tower
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    Kinnoul Hill lies just on the north side of the Tay, walkable from the town centre, and giving much fresh air, and great views over the Tay, and of a folly tower, which was built purely as a decorative landmark (in an imitation of Rheinland castles). You may also see some wildlife: I saw a red squirrel, and a roe deer.

    More info may follow...

    Meantime, the pictures.

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    Sculptures Galore

    by weewatty Updated Aug 20, 2005

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    'Coming to get you ready or not!!'

    Dotted throughtout the Fair City of Perth are many sculptures, there is even a sculpture trail to follow. Many can be found along Tay Street which runs along the banks of the River Tay in the town centre.

    The one depicted in this photo is slap bang in the middle of the High Street (outside Woolworths infact) and is quite an unusual sculpture which attracts many a weird look.

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  • Walking in the Woods - Kinnoull Hill Woodland Park

    by Dizee Updated Aug 14, 2005
    View from Kinnoull Hill
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    Around Kinnoull Hill (783 feet) there are a number of walks (1 km to 4 km - graded easy to more difficult) you can take through the woods and along the edge of the cliff to a look out tower. This offers stunning views of the River Tay as it meanders its way to meet the North Sea at Dundee. There are also lovely views in other directions on a good day.

    Be careful at the cliff edge as it is a sheer drop, especially if you have dogs or smaller children - (or even larger children like mine who are addicted to giving their mother heart palpitations by going as close to the edge as possible!).

    There is a free car park and details of the walks on a board. You may even find a walk leaflet if they are in stock. You can also pick up a walks leaflet from the tourist information office, Lower City Mills, West Mill Street, Perth.

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    Have T in the Park....Festival Style.

    by weewatty Written Jul 12, 2005

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    Aeriel View of T in the Park Site.

    Well this actually takes place near Kinross about 15 miles south of Perth but i ain't ever going to have a Kinross page, i don't think, so thought i would include my latest trip to the Scotlands biggest music festival, only behind Glastonbury in UK festivals on my Perth pages.

    Attracting 70,000 up for it and partying music fans on Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 July 2005, in sweltering (in Scottish terms anyway) summer sunshine I attended the 12th T in the Park, of the 12 held i think i have attended 7 or 8.

    Really fun (and drunken) weekend, i was a bit disillusioned with the amount of queuein, specially on the Saturday almost an hour for the bus out to the site from Perth, another hour to get in the site then another 30 mins to get beer tokens, and that was with jumpin in half way down.

    Enough of the griping though, was quite happy to see alot less neds etc there this year as there have been previously, to me anyway the crowd seemed to be there for music reasons more this year although that did'nt stop most of them myself included getting our fair share of the sponsors (Tennents Lager) £2.80 pints from the heaving bars.

    Bands I seen on the Saturday(some through a drunken haze), with marks out of 10 as much as i can remember, The Beautiful South (7/10), The Ordinary Boys (4/10), Embrace (8/10), The Killers (9/10), Keane (7/10) and The Foo Fighters (8/10).

    On the Sunday, Athlete (6/10), Razorlight (6/10), Kaiser Chiefs (7/10), Hayseed Dixie (7/10), Travis (8/10) and Ian Brown (a huffy 3/10).

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    Abernethy Round Tower

    by stevezero Written Jun 11, 2005

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    Abernethy Round Tower

    Abernethy Round Tower is one of only two round towers of the Irish type to survive in Scotland. It dates from the 11th Century and has a Pictish symbol stone built into the base of the tower.
    There are fine views from the top of the tower on a good day - the keys are available from the nearby museum.

    In the care of Historic Scotland - Admission free.

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    Balvaird Castle

    by stevezero Written Jun 4, 2005

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    Balvaird Castle

    Balvaird Castle was built in 1500 by Sir Andrew Murray, a member of the Murray family of Tullibardine. He had acquired the land as part of the dowry that came with his wife, Margaret Barclay. It was probably placed on the site of an earlier Barclay family castle.
    The castle was built, altered, developed and improved over many years. A gatehouse range was built in 1567, and the castle also incorporated various walled gardens and an orchard. The family continued to reside at Balvaird until they inherited the Earldom of Mansfield, and in 1658 they moved to the rather grander estate at Scone that came with that title.
    Today the castle comprises a very large tower house, only open to the public on summer weekends, and the ruins of a number of the courtyard buildings that supported the operation of the castle during the residence of the Murrays. It is possible to walk in a circuit through the fields below the top of the hill, and appreciate the castle and its location from all angles. Visitors calling when the tower house is not open can also explore the ruins of the courtyard.

    In the care of Historic Scotland
    Admission free

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    Burleigh Castle

    by stevezero Written Jun 4, 2005

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    Burleigh Castle

    Burleigh Castle is a roofless, but otherwise complete ruin of a tower house of about 1500.
    There is also a section of the barmkin wall and a nice tower with a squqre cap house.
    It was much visited by james IV.

    In the care of Historic Scotland

    Admission free

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    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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