Fun things to do in United Kingdom

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Most Viewed Things to Do in United Kingdom

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    Blackpool

    by solopes Updated Feb 20, 2014

    Dancing was the reason that took me to Blackpool, but with time to walk along the city and... to feel it. It was cold, not matching our image of beach, but I know that our weather is a privilege. Lots of notes, will mean a long work that will be my Blackpool page. It's already possible to have a look.

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    • Beaches
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    Wales

    by grayfo Updated Jan 20, 2014

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    Wales lies west of England and to me is a country of two halves, North Wales is linguistically and culturally different from most of Britain and is known for its beauty spots, a land of mountains and lakes interspersed with castles. The most powerful of the Welsh princes held sway here, and the residents remain staunchly nationalistic. Attractions include the coastal resorts for holidays or the walks and mountains of Snowdonia National Park. South Wales beauty lies in places like the Brecon Beacons National Park with its nature reserves, the Gower Peninsula, an area of outstanding natural beauty stretching from the Mumbles to Worms Head in the West and the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park with its great coastal scenery.

    June 2013

    See My Travel Page for more information.

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    Cotswolds

    by solopes Updated Dec 26, 2013

    In our way to Oxford we crossed an area particularly beautiful - several small villages, with limestone houses, in an old fashioned but good looking style, all clean and plenty of flowers, made us regret the short time available.

    The ambiance described by Enid Blyton in the books that all the kids read, was so real that we expected to be taken to farm to eat bacon and eggs. We weren't.
    Next time I will plan an overnight stop.

    With bacon and eggs next morning!

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Greenwich

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 8, 2013

    The UK's historic naval center also served as a center for associated sciences making it the modern reference point for Longitude and time. All the sites of Greenwich are within easy walking distance and accesible by light rail from London.

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    Stonehenge

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 8, 2013

    This is the UK's most famous site. Built up over time from 3500- 6,000 years ago for purposes not fully understood, many of the rocks were quaried from hundreds of miles away. Very little is known about the people who built this structure. The structure is surrounded by numerous mound graves.

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    Explore Cardiff Bay.

    by worldkiwi Written Aug 18, 2013

    Cardiff Bay is the name of the waterfront area in Cardiff, the capital of Wales. Easily reached on foot or by bus from the city centre, Cardiff Bay offers a great place to eat alfresco, or to enjoy some fine architecture that is both new and old.

    I spent the best part of my short time in Cardiff in 2013 in this area, during a great spell of summer weather. One of the main reasons I went to this area was to visit the Doctor Who Experience located here. Other highlights include: the striking red Pierhead; the imposing Wales Millennium Centre (where the visitor information centre is located); the quaint white Norwegian Church Arts Centre; and the chic Mermaid Quay with all its eateries and a few shops as well.

    One interesting looking option you have to get to and from Cardiff Bay and the city centre, is the waterbus. Unfortunately, the afternoon I wanted to use it, it wasn't running.

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    Explore The Cotswolds area.

    by worldkiwi Written Aug 17, 2013

    The Cotswolds is an area of rolling hill country that forms part of the western watershed to the Thames Basin. The area is famous for its picturesque stone villages, the "wool towns", and the beautiful rural countryside. The place has really grown on me since my first visit there in 2001. In 2001 and 2007 I stayed with family in a small village just east of the Cotswolds proper. In 2010 I stayed in a beautiful B&B not far from my cousin's. In 2013, I lodged in a very nice hotel in Malmesbury, England's oldest town and a town considered to be the eastern 'gateway' to The Cotswolds.

    I can highly recommend visits to the beautiful little village of Bibury and nearby Arlington (virtually one village), Tetbury with its splendid old wool market centre and massive church spire (that can be seen for miles around), and of course pleasant little Malmesbury. Other spots I liked and have visited are Bourton-on-the-Water and Painswick (on the 'other' side of the Cotswolds).

    Even the more functional parts of this region have their charm and Cirencester, the largest town on the eastern side of the hills, is a nice place to spend a few hours if you have to do some shopping.

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    Visit the Tower of London.

    by worldkiwi Updated Aug 17, 2013

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    This is a true castle. I found the castles fascinating in the UK. Right in the heart of London is one of the most complete and expansive castles. Did you know that this was once the royal residence?
    Guided tours are available from 'Beefeaters'. I actually didn't take one of these, simply because there were too many people in the group, however I overheard and saw bits of one tour and I think it would be very worthwhile.
    The crown jewels are actually quite interesting. I was dubious about their wow factor, but you must see them!
    It cost me eight pound fifty in 1997 to visit the Tower of London.

    In 2010, I did actually take one of the "Beefeater" or Yeoman Guard tours of the Tower of London, with my parents (we were touring the UK together) and it was absolutely brilliant. The guide was funny, but full of information. He did such a good talk for such a large group. I would totally recommend joining one of the Yeoman Guard guided tours of the Tower and then wandering around by yourself afterwards. The Tower of London is a place I have visited twice and I would happily go back there a third time!

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    • Castles and Palaces
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    Go to Bath.

    by worldkiwi Updated Aug 16, 2013

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    Bath is a fascinating city, full of remarkable buildings. Just about everything is constructed of honey-grey coloured stone. The Cathedral is huge and although I didn't have time to go in, it looked worthwhile.

    Of course the big draw is the Roman Bath complex, which I visited in 2001. This is really interesting and well presented. You get a commentary device, which looks like a hand piece to a telephone, in the price of entry. As you walk around the complex you can punch in the numbers of different locations (they're all signposted) and listen to a commentary on what you're looking at. No annoying headphones and you can stop and restart the commentary where you like. It is a well thought out system. Plan at least 2 hours here if you intend to learn something about what you're looking at. Three hours could be better! Another neat thing I saw in Bath back in 2001, is the medieval Pultney bridge with its shop houses.

    In 2010, I was driving south west with my parents and stopped in Bath to show them this beautiful city. We decided to climb to the roof on the Abbey for the view. My parents found the climb tough going, in fact I was a bit worried for them at one point. The tour was very informative and the views were spectacular. Ask about tours inside the Abbey.

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    Visit the Foxton Locks.

    by worldkiwi Written Aug 16, 2013

    In 2013, on my way driving south from Nottinghamshire to Essex, I stopped at the historic Foxton Locks, following some advice from my Notts cousin's husband that it was well worth seeing. Foxton Locks make for an enjoyable stretch of the legs rest stop when travelling. Parking is a flat £2.50, but the locks are free to wander around. There are ten narrow locks climbing a hill to allow tourist canal boats to continue their progress along the Grand Union Canal.

    If you're lucky, as I was, you'll be able to watch a canal boat make its way through the entire lock system here.

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    The Doctor Who Experience - Cardiff.

    by worldkiwi Written Aug 16, 2013

    Doctor Who is a British icon (and for many in the Anglo-Commonwealth that holds true there too). The Doctor Who Experience is THE place to visit for Doctor Who fans when in the UK. It is located in the attractive waterfront area called Cardiff Bay in the Welsh capital. Easily accessible by bus and on foot from downtown Cardiff, the museum and experience are an all in one package.

    I visited here in the 50th anniversary year of Doctor Who , which gave my visit a special feeling. You can book tickets online for a measly saving of a few p. I just turned up early one bright sunny morning and bought my ticket for the experience and museum at the door. Tickets for adults were £15. The experience was probably more appealing to kids, but it was fun. Interestingly my group was all adults and we didn't really get into the swing of things! How sad we are. The museum was great though with so much authentic memorabilia from the long running show.

    And for the fans, the shop at the end is a treasure cave! I learnt that if you just want to visit the shop, you can.

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    Visit Lincoln.

    by worldkiwi Written Aug 16, 2013

    In 2013, I visited Lincoln for the first time on a day trip from Nottinghamshire with my cousin and her husband. I had been inspired by the official website for visitors to the city: www.visitlincoln.com. I was not disappointed. The historic hill-top centre of town is really appealing with steep cobbled streets, no cars, the dramatic cathedral and other stone buildings. The lower part of the downtown area was a surprisingly thriving retail pedestrianised street. Having a sunny day to visit topped it all off.

    We divided our day into exploring the city by walking up and down the hill and visiting the cathedral. There is also a castle to explore.

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    Enjoy a city break in Cardiff.

    by worldkiwi Updated Aug 16, 2013

    In July 2013, during an amazingly hot spell of summer weather, I arrived in Cardiff for a couple of days - the first time I had been in this celebrated capital of Wales. The first thing I liked about Cardiff was that driving around wasn't difficult. The city's streets seemed quite wide for a UK city. The second thing I loved was the compact and walkable nature of Cardiff's city centre. I didn't use my rental car for the two days I was there! I just walked or took buses everywhere I went. Staying in St Mary's Street (right in the heart of downtown Cardiff), was great. The city centre has obviously been spruced up a lot and it works really well. Cardiff is not only walkable and enjoyable to explore on foot, it is also modern, clean, and attractive! I never realised the celebrated Cardiff Arms Park (the great rugby ground) was right in the middle of the city (why can't my home town have its premier sporting stadium in such an accessible spot?). The Cardiff Bay area is delightful in sunny blue sky 30deg plus weather! And the Doctor Who Experience (yes I'm a fan), was a highlight. I could have enjoyed two more days exploring and living in this very liveable and attractive city!

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    Nottingham Castle

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jun 23, 2013

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    This castle dates from the 17th century and has a rich, colourful and turbulent past. Nowadays there is not much left of the castle. There is the entrance gateway and the main castle building which is more like a mansion than a castle. Inside this building there are various exhibitions such as an exhibition on Robin Hood, an exhibition on Nottingham, lace, ceramics, paintings, Chinese silk (temporary). It was quite interesting and had lots of hands on stuff for children. There was also a cafe and toilets. Quite nice views over Nottingham from the castle. for example over the unusual looking inland revenue building. The castle grounds were pleasant for a stroll. Entrance £5.50 for an adult.

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    • Historical Travel
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    THE LOCKERBIE DISASTER

    by DAO Updated May 5, 2013


    Lockerbie is a quiet village of 4,000 residents, about 75 miles from Glasgow. On 21 December 1988 a bomb aboard Pan Am flight 103 exploded as it flew overhead. This plane had left Heathrow Airport bound for New York City. Instead it plunged into the ground killing 243 passengers, 16 air crew and 11 Lockerbie residents. They were murdered at the orders of Muammar Gaddafi, the brutal dictator of Libya. Today the victims lie at rest in the Dryfesdale cemetery. Along with the main memorial with all the victim’s names are individual memorials from many of the families.
    There is a full visitors' office called Dryfesdale Lodge. Originally this was a cottage used by cemetery workers. It was due to be sold off by the local government in a plan for all such buildings. It was recognised though that this was no ordinary cemetery and the Dryfesdale Lodge Visitors' Centre was opened on 25 October 2003. Inside there are permanent displays and exhibitions that feature the :Lockerbie Bombing. They also cover the ancient, Roman and Medieval history of Lockerbie. They also house temporary exhibits related to the surrounding area. Inside staff can help with question, maps and directions. There is also an accessible unisex toilet and free parking at the entrance.
    They are open every day from “end of March until 30th September 10.00 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. October 11.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. (closed on Wednesdays) Open week prior to 21st December”. I find that a bit confusing, so I have their phone number and email address below if you would like to visit.

    The grounds are very well taken care of and have a beautiful central are of gardens. The Lockerbie Memorial(s) are at the rear. The paths vary between stone flags to hard packed gravel. All the terrain is flat and wheelchair accessible. It is very easy to get here from the motorway if you are driving.

    Footnote:
    A Libyan agent, directed by Muammar Gaddafi, planted the devastating bomb in a suitcase which brought down the plane killing over 200 people. Gaddafi was dragged out of a sewer by a mob, beaten and shot dead in 2011. The agent who planted the bomb, Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, was jailed for just 10 years. Then the Scottish Government let him return to Libya where national celebrations greeted him in 2009. He died in his own bed, a free man, in 2012.

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    • Road Trip

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United Kingdom Things to Do

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Does anywhere else have so much history in such a small area?  Prehistoric sites (not just Stonehenge!); Roman towns, baths, walls; a multitude of castles, from Iron Age through to Tudor...

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