Tongue Travel Guide

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by scottishvisitor
  • Tongue
    Tongue
    by scottishvisitor
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by scottishvisitor

Tongue Things to Do

  • Port Vasgo

    From Talmine, we continued on themotorbike northwards and turned off to Port Vasgo. This was an unusual place, there being a natual channel cut between the amazingly strata'd rocks, then we think levelled out on by man the bottom to enable boats to be launched. I guess the locals knew what they were doing but to us, the coastline here looked...

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  • Achininver Beach

    This beautiful beach we discovered whilst on a trip on the motorbike, north of Talmine. It has to be one of myall time favourites. It is truly spectacular, rolling waves, white sand breached by the Strath Meiness Burn and absolutely deserted. The sun was out and the sea was so blue, I fell in love with the place and we rather fancied the ruined...

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  • Talmine

    Talmine has a pretty beach, a jetty, a couple more small beaches further on, a basic campsite and a shop. It has a remote feeling although it's not that far frm Tongue with it's massive facilities of pub, hostel, shop, petrol etc.The village of Talmine sits bove the beach, with Talmine's camsite just behind the pretty beach. Not so pretty on our...

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  • Take The Long Way Round

    If you don't cross the bridge at the Kyle of Tongue, the alternative route is a scenic, narrow road of around 8 miles that meanders along the loch on the west side, offering some nice views and heads inland a little as you turn to the east and proceed along this side, finally coming out at Tongue village before you join the main route once again....

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  • Cross The Kyle Of Tongue

    Until 1971, the vast stretch of water known as the Kyle of Tongue, had to be crossed by ferry or circumnavigated by a winding, narrow road south of the Kyle. The bridge and substantial causeway replaced the ferry although the southerly route still remains and is a scenic gem on a clear day, offering wonderful views to Ben Loyal.The low bridge is...

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  • Moody Mountains surround Tongue Beach

    After our hot and long walk from Castle Varrich it was time to cool off and visit the beach at Tongue. You can choose from the two sides of the Kyle from both sides of the bridge. We chose the left side where we encountered a wide pale golden sweep of sand so soft your feet just sunk in deeper and deeper making walking a bit of a challenge but also...

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Tongue Restaurants

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    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 29, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Tongue Hotel was built in the 1800's as a hunting lodge for the Duke of Sutherland but we won't hold this against him. It is a fine example of Victorian Architecture with lots of interesting detail. Here in the modern times you will be welcomed with genuine highland hospitality. Despite its Victorian exterior the interior is bright with modern touches but still retains the elegance of the Victorian period. We sat outside on the pretty terrace which overlooks the sea. Tables both inside and out are numbered so you select what food you want, then order and pay at the bar giving your table number. Service is friendly and efficient, the home cooked food does take a little time to prepare but worth the wait.

    Favorite Dish: We had the light lunch selection which comprised soup and sandwiches. The soup was potato (tattie) soup made with fresh mutton - hearty and deliciously wholesome. The sandwiches were generously cut filled with roast beef and horse radish sauce complete with crisps and side salad. They do a great range in real ales and malt whisky but the day was too hot so we both had cool fresh mineral water. The Tongue Hotel is a nice place to stop whatever the time of day they are happy to serve you and provide a welcome break from the road of travel.

    Hotel Interior Shooting Lodge back view Shooting Lodge the conservatory the little gate
    Related to:
    • Travel with Pets
    • Hiking and Walking

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Tongue Transportation

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    by scottishvisitor Updated Sep 7, 2008

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    click here A song for the roadThe road to Tongue from Lairg is a long slow affair which involves a drive of nearlyforty miles on the A836. On looking at the road map before we decided to journey to Tongue, neither of us realised this would be single track all the way. 'A' listed roads are normally trunk roads the 'B' roads in Sutherland are the more usual single track. The road travels through some spledid scenery as it passes Loch Loyal with Ben Loyal always looming in the distance. It is between nothing and nowhere with not a single village or even stray croft to be found on this road. I joked with my husband that I would have to look for a VT destination called passing place! Ha ha I did look and there isn't one! On the serious side the many passing places will be your guide on how to drive these roads. Some important points to remember for a safe drive are - If you see an oncoming car and the passing place is nearer you but on the right, stop opposite it on the left and allow the car to pass. Check your mirror frequently - if traffic appears behind you they are travelling much faster than you and will probably be local traffic - don't hold them up pull in and allow them on their way. You will usually get a 'thank you' by means of a double flash of indicators. Sometimes traffic meets where there is no immediate passing place, in this case the driver closest to a place behind will reverse back.
    Concentration and consideration are the key to driving here. This particular road has the national speed limit of 60 miles an hour - don't be fooled - you can't drive at this speed. Take your time and enjoy the journey.

    Related to:
    • Travel with Pets
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

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Tongue Shopping

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  • Gifts postcards & local crafts

    The Tongue Gift Shop had lots of gifts, stoneware, souveniers and a fine selection of postcards. The shop was a little cramped making browsing difficult - I do suspect this would be a down side of the visiting tour buses - all for sale but in little space to really see if anything caught your fancy. The shops close location to the Tongue Hotel made...

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  • All Kinds of everything in this little...

    The little village shop (yes singular) plays a very important part in the daily life of a small community, the shops provide the basic essentialals which help a tiny place tick over. The shop, although not large, carries a wide selection of groceries, sweets, newspapers and other daily essentials. They have an off licence located behind the counter...

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  • A Natural Selection of Wildlife Prints

    The Stable Studio here in Tongue is located in what looks like a garage, surprisingly next to it is an old stable which would have been a fantastic alternative. Like most things around here it is again a small affair but they do have a rather nice website. I didn't take any pictures inside - when even only three people enter, the studio becomes...

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Tongue Local Customs

  • A Cairn built for a man who told the...

    Donald MacLeod was a stone mason who lived in the settlement of Rossal, Strathnaver. He was a witness to the burning of 250 houses. Many of the evicted tenants were part of his family and extended family. MacLeod and his family were moved on to the coast at Strathy Point. Because he kept his memory of the events alive in people's minds, he had to...

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  • Mass was banned in the Highlands

    After the last rebellion in the Highlands in 1745 Catholic Mass was banned in the Highlands along with playing of the bagpipes, the tradition of wearing the kilt and owning weapons. The people were mainly Roman Catholic in these times and Mass was important to the deeply religious Highlanders. The celebration of Mass continued in secret often held...

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  • Tongue Hotels

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Tongue Off The Beaten Path

  • Strathnaver Museum

    The Strathnaver Museum is housed in Saint Columbia Church which was built in 1774 and is located at the Clachan, Bettyhill. This museum tracks the history of life in Srathnaver and the devestating effects of the Highland Clearances. They have a replica of what life was like inside a Highland home, I found this all very humbling to see and read how...

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  • The Glen of Silence

    Before I begin to describe the Glen of Stathnaver let me quote the words of a child - Lori Macleod a child of the tender years of eight or nine - she wrote a very poignant poem describing her thoughts on the clearances - here are Loris words - "Clearance"Ordered from our great glen to make way for southern sheep.'Left alone with no space to...

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  • Where the Highlanders' sought refuge

    The evicted Highlanders sought sanctury - not in Syre Church interior, but rather under a tarpaulin in the Kirkyard. The reasons for this are unclear (Churches at this time always had an open door) maybe the Highlanders were not Church Of Scotland followers or maybe members of the Free Church of Scotland. No matter which section of the Church they...

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Explore Deeper into Tongue
The tiny village of Bettyhill
Off The Beaten Path
Torrisdale Bay
Off The Beaten Path
Far Flung Tourist Office
Off The Beaten Path
Climb the hill to Castle Varrich
Things to Do
Map of Tongue

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