Fishguard Things to Do

  • Fishguard Fort
    Fishguard Fort
    by Balam
  • Fishguard Fort
    Fishguard Fort
    by Balam
  • Fishguard Fort
    Fishguard Fort
    by Balam

Most Recent Things to Do in Fishguard

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Stone Circle

    by himalia11 Written Aug 10, 2013

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    Stone circle in Fishguard
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    There's a Stone Circle in Fishguard at the coast path with nice views on the old harbour and towards the fort. It's not an ancient stone circle, though, it was built in 1936. It's one of the Gorsedd Stones, which are stone circles built for the National Eisteddfod, an annual Welsh festival.

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    The coast path

    by himalia11 Written Aug 10, 2013

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    The coast path
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    The Pembrokeshire Coast Path goes all along the coast of Pembrokeshire, so it's also going through Fishguard, or rather slightly below the town. The coast path there is very nice, and we especially enjoyed our walk from the Lower Town to the fort and further on along the lovely rugged coast. It reminded me of Cornwall, and I would have loved to walk there much longer! The views back towards Goodwick weren't that interesting, but I guess if you walk the coast path north of Goodwick it gets again nice!

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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    The harbour & Lower Town

    by himalia11 Written Aug 10, 2013

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    Lower Town
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    There can be some confusion when someone mentions the harbour of Fishguard. The large harbour near Fishguard where ferries go to Rosslare in Ireland actually is in Goodwick, which forms a twin town with Fishguard. Besides, there's a small harbour in Lower Fishguard, which is the old port of the town. While the main town of Fishguard is sitting on a hill above the sea, the Lower Town is down in a small bay where the river Gwaun flows into the sea. There are only a few houses, it's like a small fishing town!

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    Fort ruins

    by himalia11 Written Aug 10, 2013

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    Guns at the fort ruins
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    The fort of Fishguard was built 1781 as a protection for the town. It was armed with eight 9-pounder guns, but already fell into disrepair after the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1851.
    Today there's not too much left besides some walls. And there are some guns, but I'm not sure if these are the original ones! An any case it's a nice location, on the head opposite of Fishguard, not far from the Lower Town. You can simply follow the coast path from the Lower Town which first goes along the street until you are almost on the top of the hill and then there's a path that follows the coastline.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Kayaking Trip

    by knottyartist Written Jan 20, 2012

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    We booked online and were sent a map and a postcode for our satnav which made it really easy to find the meeting place for our trip. Our guide for the morning was Mike, who was really patient and knowledgable about he area. After getting changed we were given a safety breif before taking to the water in sea kayaks. Mike gave us some tips on how to paddle and steer the kayaks, but more importantly how to avoid falling in! Before too long we were paddling out of the harbour and along the beautiful coastline. we found some caves and one that went all the way through. Mike was very good at pointing out the birds nesting on the cliffs as we made our way towards Dinas Head. We had plenty of time to explore around the rocks before landing on a beach at the other end. We had been given dry bags to keep a change of clothes in and had time to change before we caught the bus back to our start point. This was all included in the cost for the trip and gave us chance to talk about our trip on see the photos that Mike had taken. We were then able to view and download these photos from facebook when we arrived home.

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Kayaking
    • Birdwatching

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  • andrewwhite's Profile Photo

    Gannets on Grassholm

    by andrewwhite Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Gannets

    Grassholm was christened by the Vikings (Norse men). It means ‘Green or Grass Island’. It is approximately 10 miles from the mainland and is made up of basaltic, igneous rock and is thought to be a continuation of Skomer Island.
    At one time Puffins inhabited the island in 10’s of 1000’s but now there are none.
    The Gannets have now colonised the island but there is still a lot of evidence from the Puffin era.
    The first mention of Gannets on Grassholm was in 1860. In 1872 12 pairs were recorded as breeding.
    By the 1890’s 200 or more were seen to be there, then the Cardiff Naturalists Society Robert Drane and the leassee of Skomer, J J Neale recorded seeing 300 breeding pairs in 1905.
    The birds may have relocated to Grassholm after being disturbed on the neighbouring (in Gannet terms) island of Lundy. Mr Harman, who owned both Lundy and Grassholm handed Grassholm over to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds in 1947 to preserve the Gannetry.

    In 1964 the population was estimated at 15,500, which increased to 30,000 by 1988. This makes Grassholm the second largest Gannetry in the Northern Hemisphere after St Kilda and the third largest in the world.

    Grassholm is only 22 acres and there are at least 60,000 Gannets plus their chicks and some small colonies of Guillemots, Razorbills, Kittiwakes and Shags.

    The noise, and yes, smell!! As you approach the island is phenomenal, once seen it is never forgotten. The brilliant white seen from the shore is not the colour of the rock but the birds themselves. They live within pecking distance of each other and have evolved a series of vocal and postural messages. They do not spend all their time on their nests; there are always 1000’s in the air above the island. Gannets fish by diving headfirst into the sea from all angles and from great heights.

    Information from Dale Sea Safari-Adventure Boat Trips.

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    • Sailing and Boating
    • Birdwatching

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Fishguard Fort

    by Balam Written Feb 16, 2010

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    Fishguard Fort
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    Fishguard Fort was built after a raid on Fishguard in 1779 by the privateer ship the Black Prince which demanded £1,000 to return a captured local ship and as a ransom for the town.
    When the local people refused it bombarded the town damaging the Church (St. Marys) and some houses.
    At this time Fishguard was a prosperous port and so its protection was vital and the fort was constructed being completed in 1781.
    It was armed with eight 9=pounder guns and was manned by three navy gunners that had been invalided from Woolwich, It became the headquarters of the Fishguard Fencibles.
    When on the 22nd of February 1797 an invading French force appeared off the coast alarm guns were fired from the fort but the Fencibles were then withdrawn from the fort and it played no further part.

    Following the end of the Peninsula war the fort fell into disrepair and it is now owned and maintained by the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park and it is just a short walk from a car park to visit this great site

    Entrance is Free

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  • NeetMurphy's Profile Photo

    Walking and Hiking

    by NeetMurphy Updated Jan 23, 2010
    Stones along the Coastal Path, Fishguard, Wales

    Fishguard, Pembrokeshire, Wales is situated in the perfect location for the coastal walking path. The path goes along the coast and allows you to enjoy the stunning views of the Irish Sea and Welsh countryside. Walking up and down the rugged coast and at the same time in and out of the most enchanting coastal villages.
    I would recommend it for professional or amateur hikers.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • kayaking, coasteering, surfing

    by pjfx Written Nov 13, 2006

    Best place for this is Precelli Venture near Mathry. You can either go for a weekend break or just buy an activity for the morning or afternoon. Go see seals dolphins whales and the great North Pembrokeshire coastline.

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  • andrewwhite's Profile Photo

    Strumble Head nr Fishguard

    by andrewwhite Updated Jan 6, 2005

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    Strumble Head lighthouse

    Probably the finest sea-watching site in Wales. The best times of year to visit are from Mid August to November to watch the southward migration of skuas , shearwaters and terns.
    On good days, there can be great, pomarine, arctic and long tailed skuas. Great, sooty and Balearic shearwaters. Also, thousands of the manx shearwaters which nest on nearby islands are seen at daybreak each day heading away to their feeding grounds. Always good numbers of gannets, fulmars and kittiwakes. Hundreds of common scoter can pass by each day.

    Other species seen are all three species of diver arriving to winter offshore, guillemots, razorbills, puffins and little auks. Sabine, little and Mediterranean gulls can be seen on passage.

    The cliffs and lighthouse area can also yield good sightings of rare pipits and warblers and arrivals of spring wheatear, redstart, ring ouzel etc, sand martin and swallow etc.

    Its always best to arrive by dawn to catch the best movements offshore, the best weather conditions being north westerly winds following a period of south westerlies. These help blow the birds closer inland.

    Information from WelshFalcon
    www.birdforum.net

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    • Birdwatching

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  • andrewwhite's Profile Photo

    Birdwatching

    by andrewwhite Updated Jan 6, 2005

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    Gannets

    Pembrokeshire is an absolute delight for birdwatchers and wildlife enthusiasts alike. It is spectacularly beautiful and sparsely populated, almost surrounded by the ocean and providing a perfect refuge for wildlife. The National Trust protects much of the coastline and there are several island bird sanctuaries.

    Fishguard Harbour is a good place to see Great Northern Divers and some of the less usual gulls. Mediterranean Gulls regularly winter and other species pop up from time to time, like Ring-billed and Glaucous Gulls. Rarities have included Forster’s Tern and Ross’s Gull.

    Skomer Island and Grassholm are also RSPB reserves with thriving seabird colonies. The 60,000 strong Gannet colony on Grassholm is especially impressive. Visit Skomer in June to see puffins. More detailed information on boat trips and places of interest for birdwatching is available at www.visitpembrokeshire.co.uk.

    This information is from the Seaview Hotel web-site.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Birdwatching

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  • andrewwhite's Profile Photo

    Ramsey Island

    by andrewwhite Written Nov 9, 2004

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    Kittiwake

    This dramatic offshore island has 400 feet/120 m seabird cliffs and fine examples of coastal heathland. The seabird cliffs are occupied between April and July. Choughs and wheatears breed on the island. In the autumn, a colony of breeding grey seals can also be seen.
    Ramsey Island, off St Davids peninsula is owned and managed by the RSPB. Boat safaris, landing boats and fast jet-boat trips all leave from St Justinian’s. Thousand Island Expeditions are the only boat operator allowed to land on Ramsey and there is a limit on the number of people permitted on to the island each day.
    Britain’s first Indigo Bunting was seen here, so it is well worth a visit. The island has fine colonies of Guillemots, Razorbills and Kittiwakes as well as nesting Shags, Lapwings, Peregrines and Choughs.

    Check with Thousand Islands Expeditions, Cross Square, St. Davids (tel 01437 721721) for boat ticket availability.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Birdwatching

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