Laugharne Things to Do

  • Laugharne Castle
    Laugharne Castle
    by Balam
  • Laugharne Castle
    Laugharne Castle
    by Balam
  • Laugharne Castle
    Laugharne Castle
    by Balam

Most Recent Things to Do in Laugharne

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    Laugharne Castle

    by Myfanwe Updated Aug 8, 2011

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    Laugharne Castle
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    Laugharne Castle is a magnificent castle holding a prominent position over the estuary of the River Taf. The original ringwork castle was probably established in 1116 by Robert Courtemain. The Castle passed through many hands of noblemen over the centuries, when it was captured, burnt and badly damaged. In 1247 the Castle was granted to Guy de Brian IV who before his death did much to re-shape the Castle in its' later form. His son Guy V continued the work and granted Laugharne its borough charter. It was in around 1390 that the Castle was strengthened and the accomodation was improved.

    The castle became subject to inheritance disputes for many years, it was reinforced in 1403 for fear of attack by Owain Glyndwr but it was left alone by the rebels.

    In 1585 the Castle fell into the hands of Sir John Perret who found it a ruin and did his best to convert it to a Tudor mansion as he did Carew.

    The last private owners, the Starke family did some restoration work in the 1930's and rented the Castle to novelist Richard Hughes, who lived in Castle House and wrote his second novel 'In Hazard' (1938) in the gazebo, a place which was also favoured by his good friend Dylan Thomas.

    Adult - £3.00, Concession - £2.60, Family - £8.60
    Entry is free for Welsh residents aged 60 and over or 16 and under who have a valid pass. To find out how to get one please go to the free entry scheme page.

    Unfortunately, the Castle was closed during our visit in February but we did manage a return visit in July 2011 - it was a lovely sunny day too. See travelogue for more pics of the Castle.

    Opening Times:

    01.04.09 - 31.10.09: Daily 10.00 - 17.00
    01.11.09 - 31.03.10: Closed

    Admission charges; Adult - £3.00, Concession - £2.60, Family - £8.60

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Laugharne Castle

    by Balam Updated Jul 30, 2011

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    Laugharne Castle
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    I first visited Laugharne Castle in February of 2009 I thought was the most impressive castle I have seen for a while, It towers above the small harbour and wetlands and really does look grand. I would love to go back when the weather is better to take some more pictures of it with the little stone bridge in front and because when we visited laugharne, the castle was closed so we could not go inside.

    We visited again in July of 2011 on a lovely Sunny Day, I have updated the Pictures

    Adult £3.00, Concession £2.60, Family £8.60
    Entry is free for Welsh residents aged 60 and over or 16 and under who have a valid pass and to members of CADW

    Opening Times:
    01.04.09 - 31.10.09: Daily 10.00 - 17.00

    01.11.09 - 31.03.10: Closed

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    The Boat House

    by Myfanwe Updated Feb 21, 2010

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    The home of a great Poet
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    The boathouse was the home of Dylan Thomas and his family from 1949 until his death in 1953 it was originally bought for the Thomas family by a friend for the sum of £3,000. In 2003 the boat house was restored to its' original condition and is now open to the public & is fully furnished with original 1950's furniture which belonged to the Thomas family. For a small fee you can wander around the house taking in the wonderful views out of the windows while listening to the famous poems which are played in the background.

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    Dylan's Walk

    by Myfanwe Written Feb 18, 2010

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    Dylan's Walk
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    Dylan's Walk is a lovely path which leads from the Village of Laugharne along the clifftop towards the Boathouse. If you begin at the Town Hall and follow the road to the left you will pass Seaview, a lesser known former home of Dylan Thomas (see other tip). As you carry on towards the coast you will pick up the clifftop path named Dylan's Walk. Halfway along the path you can view the writing shed which inspired Dylan to write many of his poems, a birdhide overlooking the Taf Estuary and eventually you will reach the Boathouse. It is a lovely easy path to walk along, most of it is fairly flat and accessable with a little gradient at the beginning.

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    Laugharne Town Hall

    by Myfanwe Written Feb 17, 2010

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    Town Hall Laugharne
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    The Town Hall is a lovely whitewashed building with a great clocktower, situated on the main road into the village. It is the home to the Laugharne Corporation which was founded in 1927 with a charter granted by Sir Guy De Brion the younger. The Corporation is presided over by a Portreeve and a Grand Jury of twenty Burgesses which meets at the Town Hall every fortnight.

    The Corporation is a registered charity. It owns property in and around the township, the income from which is given to good causes in Laugharne.

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    Another former Home of Dylan Thomas

    by Myfanwe Written Feb 17, 2010

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    Seaview is now a classy restuarant and Bed and Breakfast but from 1938 to 1941 it was home to Dylan Thomas and his wife Caitlin. It was here Thomas wrote 'The Map of Love' and 'A Saint about to fall'. At that time the Thomas's paid seven shillings and sixpence a week in rent for Seaview, their landlord was Tudor Williams, brother of the landlord of Brown's Hotel, where Dylan spent much of his time.

    It looks like a great place to stay especially if you're a Dylan Thomas fan. The restaurant was not open during our visit but we had a look at the menu which seemed a bit pricey but we were told by some of the locals in the three Mariners pub that it is somewhere to go for a special occasion.

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    Fab Birdwatching at the Grist

    by Myfanwe Updated Feb 17, 2010

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    The Grist
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    The Grist is the open area of tidal mudflats in front of the shore side car park. The saltmarshes provide a fantastic marine environment for a number of wading birds. While we were there we could see Curlew's, Oyster Catcher and many more. There are many theories as to why the area is called the Grist. Some believe that there was once a Monastery in Laugharne called Christ Church while others say that the name derives from a former corn or grist mill which once existed at the mouth of the river Corran. There is a lovely path which runs from the Boat house which has the Grist on the one side and the Castle on the other, a lovely place for a stroll to admire the beautiful surroundings.

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    Dylan Thomas's Grave

    by Myfanwe Updated Feb 16, 2010

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    St Martin's Parish Church
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    Dylan Thomas and his Wife Caitlin are buried in the Churchyard of St Martins Parish Church. Their grave is marked by a simple White Cross which is a little on the difficult side to find. The interior of the church itself has some lovely feature windows and a Memorial Plaque to Dylan which says; “Time held me green and dying, Though I sang in my chains like the sea” – a line from his most famous poem “Fern Hill”.

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    The Grist

    by Balam Written Feb 15, 2010

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    The Grist
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    The open wet land area were estuary meets the sea is localy called The Grist, it silted up land over a formal tidal inlet where the river Corran meets the sea. The salt marches and muddy pills or creeks on the seaward side of the car park have developed only under the last hindred years, There are many theories on the origins of the name, Although a tradition of a monastery called christ church may have developed in order to explain the presence of a stone cross there but the name most probably derives from a former corn or grist mill that was once situated at the mouth of the river corran

    It is a great place for bird watching

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    Dylan Thomas's Boat House

    by Balam Written Feb 15, 2010

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    Dylan Thomas's Boat House
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    When Dylan Thomas Returned to Laugharne he lived in The Boat House from 1949 - 1953, while he lived here it is said that he did some of his best work while writing in the Garage for the house which he had con verted into a writing shed.
    The house is now a Cafe and museum dedicated to Dylan.
    I have not been in because there is a charge, it's not because i am tight but because i was told it is much the same as the Dylan Thomas Centre in Swansea and because i had been there the day before (and it is free). i belive that you can visit the Cafe without paying entry though.

    It is Open may To October and Easter Weekend
    10.00am - 5.30pm (Last admission 5.00 pm)

    November to April
    10.30am - 3.30pm (last admission 3.00 pm)

    There is an admission charge with concessions for senior citizens, children, family parties and organised groups.

    Children under 7 are admitted free

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    Dylan Thomas's Writing Shed

    by Balam Written Feb 15, 2010

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    Dylan Thomas's Writing Shed
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    Walking around Laugharne you will get the impression that a poet used to live there, Well one did! and he did in fact live there twice (not at the same time though) the first time he lived in Laugharne he lived in what is now The Sea View Guest House and Restaurant. he then moved away and after a while he came back and lived in what is now known as Dylan Thomas's Boathouse.
    The Garage for the Boathouse was situated a little way away from the house kind of perched on the edge of a cliff, now i don't know if Dylan had a car or not but i'm presuming that he didn't as he furnished the Garage and made it into his writing shed. It was in this writing shed that it is said, he wrote some of his best work like the Play 'Under Milk Wood' said to be based on Laugharne.

    The original doors are in the Dylan Thomas centre in Swansea but the Garage / writing shed has been restored and has new doors which allow you to see inside, just the way it was when he did his writing.

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    The Grave of Dylan Thomas

    by Balam Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    Grave of Dylan Thomas
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    The grave of Dylan Thomas is situated in the Graveyard of St Martins Church, not the graveyard which is in the town on the way towards his writing Shed and house were most people expect it to be. St Martins Church is just on the edge of the town and has 2 graveyards, if you park on the large carpark off the road in front of the church and walk up the steps, although the church is surrounded by a graveyard you have to turn right and go over the small bridge to the churches other graveyard, Dylan thomas's grave is in the middle. his wife Caitlin is also buried there and her name is on the other side of the cross.

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    The Writing Shed

    by alancollins Written Dec 16, 2009

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    The writing shed
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    The writing shed started life as a garage in the 1920s. Built by a local carpenter, who constructed it in panels which were transported to the site. Dylan Thomas had a set pattern for his days and used the building to write in the afternoons after a lunch at the local pub. If you peek in the windows you can see exactly how the building was laid out when used by Dylan Thomas. Some of his best work including ‘Under milk wood’ was written in the writing shed.

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    The Boathouse

    by alancollins Written Dec 10, 2009

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    The Boathouse
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    The Boathouse in Laugharne has put the village on the map due to the writer and poet Dylan Thomas and his family, living in the house from 1949 until 1953. Some of the rooms in the house contain furniture and other items used by Dylan Thomas and his family. The house has splendid views over the Taf Estuary as well as a cafe. The website provides details of opening times and admission costs.

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    Laugharne Castle

    by alancollins Updated Dec 4, 2009

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    Laugharne Castle
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    Laugharne Castle overlooks the Taf Estuary and dates from the 13th century, though there were earlier earth works on the site. Altered over the years it was damaged during the Civil War and it was allowed to gradually detoriated and end up as a ruin. During recent years work has been carried out to restore the castle. The castle is open daily between 10-17 hours from 1st April till 31st October and costs £3 for an adult entrance fee.

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