Abergavenny Things to Do

  • The old house
    The old house
    by ranger49
  • One of the terraces
    One of the terraces
    by ranger49
  • Things to Do
    by ranger49

Most Recent Things to Do in Abergavenny

  • ranger49's Profile Photo

    Abergavenny Museum and Castle

    by ranger49 Updated Feb 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ruined remains of Abergavenny's Norman Castle, still standing in pleasant grounds, provided the site for a 19th century Hunting Lodge which in 1959 became the Abergavenny Museum.
    From its modest beginnings we have seen the Museum expand to increase the range of exhibits displayed covering a time span from pre-history to the 20th century..

    Don't miss Basil Jones Shop - I remember shopping in it when it was still in business in the High Street.
    After the death of the owner the interior and all its contents, were moved lock, stock and barrel to the Museum. Most of the contents were even then long past their sell by date.
    For older people it is fun to see familiar products of a bygone age, for children a lesson in how things were.
    Likewise the Welsh Kitchen reconstruction shows the kind of home a relatively well off family might have lived in - very comfortable then, but not now - by modern day standards!

    Admissiom is free - open all year, closes for lunch 1 - 2pm.
    For some special events in the Museum and Castle grounds there may be a charge.

    Parking in the Castle grounds is also free to Visitors.

    A winter walk to the castle Museum and Tower from Castle Meadows in summer Information displayin the grounds The Ruins Information

    Was this review helpful?

  • ranger49's Profile Photo

    A 13th century Tithe Barn Revived.

    by ranger49 Written Feb 16, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The tithe barn of St. Mary's Priory Church passed into private ownership many years ago.. It recent decades it stood alongside the church becoming more and more neglected.
    It was with vision and a brave act of faith that the church bought back the derelict building on 1999.
    Behind the reopening, in October 2008 by HRH Prince Charles, are eight centuries of turbulence, progress, change and decay, and finally renewal.

    In the 40+ years that I have known the building it has been - among other short lived enterprises - a disco, an antiques and auction house, and a carpet salesroom.
    The 32 page booklet on sale at the visior centre in the entrance hall gives you an awful lot of clearly written history and is well worth buying for £2.50 .

    Funding for the restoration was obtained from sources including the Heritage Lottery Fund for Wales; the Welsh European Funding Office and the Tourism arm of the Welsh Assembly Government and local fundraising. The aim of restoration was simple " To make St. Mary's Tithe Barn a remarkable place to learn about local history including the history of St.Mary's Priory."
    The beautifully restored Barn provides a community facility offering education and learning for school groups and other visitors.
    And a peaceful venue in the ground floor Food Hall for excellent, modestly priced refreshments .
    There is a lift for disabled visitors to access the upper floor.

    Was this review helpful?

  • greenjules's Profile Photo

    Visit the Priory Church

    by greenjules Updated Apr 17, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Mary's has some very special and unique monuments including a very rare medeival carving of Jesse from the Bible. He was once used to depict the family tree of Jesus from Jesse to King David he is the only wooden figure of Jesse to be found in Britain. . There are loads more interesting bits and bobs to look at too.

    Jesse St Mary's Priory Church
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Abergavenny Castle

    by barryg23 Written Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The medieval castle is the most prominent site in Abergavenny. It's located close to the centre of town on Castle street, just west of the main street. There are fantastic views of Blorenge, one of the Black Mountains, to the west. The castle grounds are free to visit though the town museum, in a building at the far end of the grounds, has an entrance fee. Most of the castle is in ruins though there are useful information plaques explaining the history of the castle and what each section of the ruins was originally used for.

    Abergavenny Castle Blorenge Mountain (I think this is the name) Castle Entrance

    Was this review helpful?

  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Climbing Sugar Loaf Mountain

    by barryg23 Updated Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Sugar Loaf is the highest of the three Black Mountains surrounding Abergavenny. It's a fairly easy ascent to the summit though a wet and windy New Year's Eve was perhaps not the ideal time for the climb. These Black mountains are in the eastern edge of the Brecon Beacons and are much less visited than the more popular mountains, such as Corn Du and Pen y Fan, to the west. After a lovely full-English breakfast at out hotel we set off for the Sugar Loaf. The climb begins at Mynydd Llanwenarth, which can be very tricky to find even with a map.

    To get there head west out of Abergavenny on the A40, and about half a mile out of town turn off to the right on to Pentre Road (If you get to Pyscodlyn Camping and Caravan site you've gone about a mile too far on the A40). This narrow road leads up to a vineyard which is where you next turn off. The narrow road climbs from the vineyard to Mynndd Llanwenarth and there are fantastic views along of Abergavenny, Blorenge and the surrounding country side along the way. Mynndd Llanwenarth is at the highest point in the road and there is a car-park and a sign indicating the stop.

    From the car-park you can follow the path up to the mountain. It takes about 40 minutes to reach the summit and the scenery along the way is fantastic. The summit is fairly long (about 20-25 metres long) so there are nice views in all directions. Be careful on the descent, especially in winter as the path can get quite dangerous. I slipped three times on the way down but luckily we had passed all the rocks by then

    On the summit Start of the hike Sugar Loaf Mountain Abergavenny in the distance Ruth at the summit

    Was this review helpful?

  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    St Mary's Priory Church

    by christine.j Written Oct 22, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Apart from the Jesse tree there are more interesting things to see in the church. The church was founded in the 11th century and holds several tombs or tomb plates from important people throughout the centuries. I especially liked the carving of this lion. Throughout Europe the lion was seen as the king of the animal world, as very brave and great, and so lots of tomb plates show men standing on lions. Everybody should see that they had been even greater and braver than a lion. Some of these lions look more like sheep, but this one here in Abergavenny really is a lion.

    Another carving can be seen in the church, the last supper of Jesus. I wasn't able to find out more about it, like who did it or when, so all I can say is I think it's beautifully done.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    A wonderful example of 15th century carving

    by christine.j Written Oct 22, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abergavenny's large church, St. Mary's Priory Church, holds many beautiful old carvings. The most impressive is the Jesse tree from 15th century.
    Considering that many people back then couldn't read or write, these trees were supposed to illustrate the family tree of Jesus. King David's father was called Jesse and with him the family tree was started. The final part would have been Mary and Jesus.
    The base of this statue has survived through the centuries, while the tree growing out of it has been lost. The statue was carved from one single oak tree and must have been painted once. Anne showed me where a tiny fleck of red still could be seen.
    It is estimated that the complete tree would have been almost 10 meter high!!

    Take the time and look at the many details in the carving. It's an absolutely beautiful piece of art.

    Five years ago this Jesse tree was part of an exhibition in the Tate Gallery in London. It was the main exhibition item there.

    The Jesse Tree
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    The Periwig Makers!

    by Myfanwe Written Mar 15, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abergavenny was well known for the manufacture of white Periwigs. As you walk along Nevill street you can see a plaque stating 'On this site lived James Jones, hair bleacher circa 1741.

    James Jones & his wigs! The site of the periwig makers
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Rother House and other Georgian Properties

    by Balam Written Feb 23, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are some fine Georgian Properties in Nevill Street reflect the towns prosperity, The wide doorways of houses like Rother House (number 11) were to allow Ladies with crinoline dresses to enter.

    Rother House Rother House
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Abergavenny

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

32 travelers online now

Comments

Abergavenny Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Abergavenny things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Abergavenny sightseeing.

View all Abergavenny hotels