Bangor Things to Do

  • Bangor Pier
    Bangor Pier
    by Myfanwe
  • Bangor Pier
    Bangor Pier
    by Myfanwe
  • Bangor Stone Circle
    Bangor Stone Circle
    by Myfanwe

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    Bangor University

    by Myfanwe Written May 6, 2010

    Bangor University commands a fine vantage position overlooking the centre of Bangor and beyond. These great Edwardian buildings were created by Thomas Hare. They are full of character and history; the University was founded in 1884. I was lucky enough to have a look inside at the decorative great hall and music rooms. Normally, the terrace is open to the public where you can get a splendid view over Bangor, right over to Anglesey. Below the University is a lovely leafy area called College Park which is also open to the public.

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    The Porch of the Penrhyn Arms Hotel

    by Myfanwe Updated May 4, 2010
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    The porch remains as a memorial to the fact that the University, founded in 1884, was first established here, only moving to its present sites from 1910. The hotel had 130 beds, and stabling for 100 horses.

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    Penrhyn Castle

    by Myfanwe Written May 4, 2010
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    Penrhyn Castle is a mighty, majestic Castle which sits on a hillside to the East of Bangor. It is owned and maintained to a very high standard by the National Trust. The Castle is 200 yards long with 70 roofs extending over an acre. It was built between 1820 and 1837 of Anglesey limestone, to the design of Thomas Hopper.

    Inside the house you will be amazed by the intricately carved furniture, elegant carvings and wonderfully furnished bedrooms. Don't miss the excuisite carved oak bed in the state bedroom and Dressing Room - this was used by Queen Victoria in 1859.

    The restored kitchens are a delight to see and the stable block houses a fascinating industrial railway museum, a model railway museum and a superb dolls' museum.

    Photography is not allowed inside the Castle. I would highly recommend a visit if you're in the area just to see how great it is for yourself!!

    We found the leaflet ' A short guide to Penrhyn Castle ' extremely useful and very informative. This is for sale at the shop and the entrance to the Castle.

    Admission Prices (April 2010): adult £10 (£9), child £5 (£4.50), family £25 (£22.50). Grounds and and stable block exhibitions only: adult £6.60 (£6), child £3.50 (£3) - Prices in brackets are without gift aid (charity donation) which is optional.

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    Port Penrhyn

    by Myfanwe Written May 4, 2010
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    Port Penrhyn is a great area just East of Bangor Pier. It was an important port in the 19th century, exporting the slates produced at the Penrhyn Quarry. Nowadays this is a picturesque port area where a mixture of commercial and pleasure boats are kept and maintained.

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    Visit the Cathedral

    by Myfanwe Written May 4, 2010
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    The origins of the city date back to the founding of a monastic establishment on the site of Bangor Cathedral by the Celtic saint Deiniol in the early 6th century AD. The name 'Bangor' itself is an old Welsh word for a type of fenced-in enclosure, such as was originally on the site of the cathedral. The present cathedral is a somewhat more recent building and has been extensively modified throughout the centuries.

    The Cathedral was open during our visit and we were free to wander around. There are some great features inside including the paintings of biblical stories but with modern day characters. There is also a lovely little gift shop selling books and crafts.

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    A Great Pier

    by Myfanwe Written May 4, 2010
    Bangor Pier
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    Bangor Pier is the second longest in Wales and also the 9th longest in the British Isles, being 1,500 feet (or 472 metres). The name of the Pier is Garth Pier meaning point or promonotory in Welsh. It was almost demolished in 1974 due to the poor condition it was in at the time. However local support for the pier ensured that it survived and gained a Grade 2 listed status, as it was considered one of the three finest surviving piers at the time. Restoration work began in 1982 and did not finish until 1988. The pier was re-opened on Saturday, 7 May 1988.

    You can enjoy a gentle stroll along the pier, visit the gift shop, quench your thirst at the coffee shop or just sit and admire the stunning views of the Anglesey, the Menai Bridge and the Snowdonia Mountain range. This is definitely my favourite bit of Bangor.

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    North Wales Path

    by Evenith666 Written Mar 16, 2010

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    The North Wales path goes from Bangor, along the coast to Prestatyn, past Conwy. We did the walk with the intention of camping in the hills above Penmaenmawr by some stone circles, however we lost time, despite cutting off a large corner of the path at the beginning, and realized that we would not be able to reach our camping point before it was too dark. This, combined with the prospect of walking even more the next day, meant that we decided it was best to walk down to Llanfairfechan and get the train back. We suffered on the walk with the weight of our bags and as I write this two days later my shoulders are sore. If, however, we had set off with the intention of getting the train back from Llanfairfechan rather than camp, it would have been a lovely walk and easily manageable. Aber Falls is stunning, and is definitely something that you should see while you are in North Wales, so for a day this is a lovely walk. I plan to do it again, but without all the camping gear next time!

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    Hendre Hall

    by Balam Updated Mar 16, 2010

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    On the outskirts of Bangor at Tal y Bont you’ll find Hendre Hall– one of the best preserved Victorian farmyards in Britain. Not only can you wonder around the building and delve into its history but it’s also a great place to pick up some unique arts and crafts and jewellery. And you might be surprised to find that Hendre’s banqueting hall turns into a perfect place for a night out. They have regular theme parties and live music nights plus the facility to book the hall for your own special event.

    In early April 2010 they are opening a Farm shop and a cafe.

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    Aber Falls

    by Balam Updated Mar 9, 2010

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    Thousands of visitors flock to the scenic Rhaeadr Fawr or Aber Falls every year, It is located between the Carneddau mountain range and the coast just off the A55 in the Coedydd Aber Nature Reserve .
    the Aber Falls waterfall is said to be one of the steepest in both England and Wales.

    The water of the Afon Goch plunges over 120 ft into a marshy area where it is joined by two tributaries beboming the Afon Rhaeadr Fawr. It then heads towards the Menai Strait and into the sea.

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    Port Penrhyn

    by Balam Updated Mar 9, 2010

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    Port Penrhyn, Bangor
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    The history of Port Penrhyn can be traced to 1713 were it had been recorded that some14 shipments totalling 415,000 slates had been sent to Dublin.
    In 1720, another 8 shipments totalling 155,000 slates were sent to Dublin, two to Drogheda (20,000) and one to Belfast (35,000). Two years later, a shipment of 80,000 slates were sent to Dunkirk.
    After these few shipments only coastal traffic left from Aber-Cegin (Port Penrhyn) until Richard Pennant took over the ownership of Penrhyn Estates and in 1786 appointed Benjamin Wyatt as agent.
    It was Wyatt that addressed the problem of bringing slates from the quarry at Bethesda to Port Penrhyn by laying a rail line between the two sites. A stone wharf was built at the mouth of the River Cegin by 1790, it was further extended in 1830 with a final extension taking place in 1855 which included a breakwater on the eastern side which then formed an inner basin and so Port Penrhyn was created

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    Walk to Menai Bridge

    by Balam Updated Oct 19, 2009

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    Tree Lined Road
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    After visiting the Pier a 40 minute walk along the Raised Coast Rd will take you to The Menai Bridge and crossing it to the Small town of the same name. great views of the Menai Straits can be had from the road on the way and from the bridge. There are some nice shops in the town and some pubs serving food as well as Cafes and Restaurants

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    Bangor Museum and Art Gallery

    by Balam Updated Oct 15, 2009

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    Bangor Museum and Art Gallery
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    Bangor Museum and Art Gallery have an interesting exhibition of local antiquities and changing displays of Welsh art.

    It is open Tuesday to Friday 12:30 - 16:30
    Saturday 10:30 - 16:30

    Admission is free

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  • having a good night.

    by madnige Written Aug 9, 2009

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    bangor is a great place, night life for such a small town is excellent, However certain protocols MUST be observed.... 1) The locals.. These people are the residents... Its their CITY... Just cos your at uni and they are serving you in shop, pub, burger bar etc DOESNT mean you are better... You try their life and they are doin it better than you could,,, 2) the language..... If you go to spain or italy and the locals are talking to each other in spanish or italian.... you dont get upset and assume that they are talking about YOU... They probably arent.... Same in wales.... Its their country and their language.... PLEASE dont take offence and LET THEM USE IT.... WARNING WARNING WARNING Bangor has a virus...... If you spend too long there you just want to stay..... Or constantly return....

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    Bangor Pier (Y Garth)

    by Balam Updated Feb 24, 2009

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    Bangor Pier (Y Garth)
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    The fully restored Bangor Pier stretches out into the Menai Strait, appearing to almost reach Anglesey.
    Built in 1896, this attractive pier is a pleasant place for a stroll, with views of the strait, the Great Orme Llandudno, Anglesey, Snowdonia, Telford’s suspension bridge and Bangor itself.

    Bangor Pier

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    Roman Camp

    by Evenith666 Written Feb 18, 2009

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    The name ‘Roman Camp’ is somewhat deceiving, in that there is no evidence of a settlement existing there in Roman Times. Archaeological findings tell us that it was in fact the Normans that first settled there. It is believed that Hugh D'Avranches, Earl of Chester, built the fort at the beginning of the 12th Century. Its design is consistent with other Motte and Bailey Castles from the same period.
    The site offers fantastic views of the Menai Straights, Menai Bridge, the Isle of Anglesey, ‘Puffin’ Island, Snowdonia National Park and the town of Llandudno.

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Bangor Things to Do

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