Caernarfon Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Herwig1961
  • Things to Do
    by Herwig1961
  • Things to Do
    by Herwig1961

Most Recent Things to Do in Caernarfon

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    Segontium Roman Fort

    by Balam Updated Apr 15, 2009

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    Segontium Roman Fort
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    Segontium Roman Fort saw active service between AD77 and AD395, it was originally built in wood but was gradually rebuilt using stone from from around AD140.
    In it's heyday, garrisoned by the 20th Augustan Legion and surrounded by a shanty town which would have been inhabited by traders and and by the familys of the soldiers it would have represented an impressive urban complex in what would then have been a totaly rural part of the world.
    The on site museum offers some fine examples of roman coins and other items that have been found on site.

    The Museum and Fort are free to visit
    they are open Tuesday to Sunday and on Bank Holiday Mondays.
    opening times are 12:30 to 16:30
    closed mondays

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    Victoria Dock (Doc Fictoria)

    by Balam Updated Mar 31, 2009

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    Victoria Dock
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    Victoria Dock was built in the 1870's due to an increase in shipping for the Local Slate industry. As the industry declined the dock was used less and less but was then redeveloped into a Yachting marina and was chosen as the location for Y Galeri arts Centre.
    Situated just outside the city walls it is now very much a part of a great new development which contains Fu's Chinese restaurant, Yr Harbwr bar and restaurant, Celtica Retail Centre, A Premier Inn and a Travelodge.

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    The Town Walls

    by Balam Written Mar 31, 2009

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    Caernarfon Town Walls
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    Both the Castle and the town wall were largely constructed by 1285 although work continued on them for many years after.
    Archways in the town walls at the ends of Market st, church st and at North Gate st are not original and were added during the 18th and 19th centuries to ease traffic flow.

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    Caernarfon Castle

    by Balam Updated Mar 31, 2009

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    Caernarfon Castle
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    Caernarfon (Carnarvon in English) is certainly the most famous of the Many Castles of Wales; Begun in 1283 on the site of what was first a Roman fort and then a Norman motte and bailey castle built by 'Hugh of Avranches' sometime around 1090. The original motte was incorporated into the Edwardian castle, but was sadly destroyed around 1870.
    King Edward I built Caernarfon castle to mark a pinnacle in his conquest of Wales, The castle was designed as a military stronghold, royal palace and as the seat of government.
    The sheer scale and majestic controlling presence easily setting apart from apart from the rest and even to this day retains in no uncertain terms the intention of its builder King Edward I.
    The castle was designed built to echo the walls of Constantinople, the imperial power of Rome and Edwards ultimate dream castle, and certainly even after all these years Caernarfon's immense strength and imposing power remains.

    The castle stands at the mouth of the Seiont River and with its highly unique polygonal towers and Great intimidating battlements dominates the old walled town of Caernarfon which also founded by Edward I to house the builders and then castle employees.
    Edward certainly made sure of the symbolic status of Caernarfon by making sure that his son, the first English Prince of Wales, was born there in 1284.
    In 1969 the Caernarfon gained worldwide fame by hosting the Investiture of Prince Charles as The Prince of Wales.

    The castle houses the Regimental Museum of the Royal Welch Fusiliers which is Wales's oldest regiment.
    Many special events are held throughout the year.

    Adults £5.10, Reduced rate £4.70
    A Family Ticket is available at £15.00 for 2 adults and up to 3 children (under 16 years.)

    The Castle is Open:
    1st April to 31st October - 09.00 - 17.00 daily
    1st November to 31st March - 09.30 - 16.00 Monday to Saturday, 11.00 - 16.00 Sunday

    It is closed:- 24th, 25th, 26th December and 1st January.

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    Segontium

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 14, 2008

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    Remnants of the old Roman fort

    One of the best Roman sites in Wales, Segontium was a Roman auxiliary fort built in 77 AD. It housed up to about 1,000 soldiers. These auxiliary soldiers, not Roman citizens, served 25 years. The fort occupied a key position overlooking the Menai Strait. It was also an administrative centre.

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    Caernarfon Castle

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 14, 2008

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    Caernarfon Castle
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    A vital part of King Edward I's "iron ring" of castles, Caernarfon Castle was built at a strategic location on the Menai Strait. Designed by Master James of St George, it was completed in 1285. This is one of the finest examples of medieval castle architecture in Wales. Its wall, with their nine towers and two gatehouses, offer some outstanding views of the town, the countryside, and the Menai Strait.

    It's also the site of the traditional Investiture ceremony, where the crown prince of Britain is officially named Prince of Wales. This began with King Edward I, to legitimize his conquest of Wales.

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    Caernarfon Castle - East Gate

    by kelnsha Written Nov 27, 2006

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    The East Gate, also known as the Exchequer Gate
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    This was the principal landward entrance to the town. Here Greengate Street passes under a stone bridge, which incorporates the final arch of a medieval bridge that was built in 1301 to carry the approach to the walled town across the low-lying river Cadnant (which is now culverted over). The rooms above the gate were used to accommodate the exchequer, which from 1284 served as the administrative and financial centre of the new counties of Anglessey, Caernarfon and Merioneth.

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    Caernarfon Castle: Arrowloops

    by kelnsha Updated Nov 24, 2006

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    Arrowloops are familiar defensive feature
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    One of the most interesting features in the castle is the multiple groupings of arrowloops at two levels in the curtain wall on either side of the Granary Tower. These represent a refinement of the arrangements noted in the upper floors of the King's Gate. The firepower, which these loops enabled to be brought to bear on a limited front, must - by medieval standards - have been devastating.

    Arrowloops are familiar defensive feature of medieval fortifications, allowing the maximum field of fire through the minimum external opening. At Caernarfon they reached the peak of deadly ingenuity.

    Here the embrasures are contrived to allow up to three crossbowmen to discharge their bolts through a single external loop, thus enabling a fast and deadly crossfire to be laid down - in effect a kind of medieval machine-gun. The arrangement demanded considerable skill and discipline from the bowmen, who formed the mainstay of the castle's defence.

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    Caernarfon Castle: Granary Tower

    by kelnsha Written Nov 23, 2006

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    Granary Tower at the center
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    In many respects the Granary Tower duplicates the Well Tower. It is octagonal, of four storeys surmounted by a turret, and has a wall-passage at ground level leading to a well chamber. Of the main rooms, only the top floor, which is unroofed, is accessible to visitors. It is crossed by the walk-walk along the top of the curtain wall which can be followed across the King's Gate to the Well Tower and so down to the courtyard again.

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  • kelnsha's Profile Photo

    Caernarfon Castle: North-East Tower

    by kelnsha Written Nov 21, 2006

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    North-East Tower at the extreme left
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    This is an octagonal tower of two storeys only. The ground-floor room houses an exhibition on the princes of Wales. The characteristic wall-passages of the southern curtain are continued round the outer sides of the tower, but do not go beyond it. This is because the work of the earlier building period terminates here and wall-passages were not provided in the northern curtain which, from this point to the Eagle Tower, dates from 1295 and later. The stair is at the top of the turret. The battlements of this turret are unusual in having arrowloops set beneath them.

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    Caernarfon Castle - Watch Tower

    by kelnsha Written Nov 21, 2006

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    L-R: NE & Watch Towers, Queen's Gate & Black Tower
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    A look-out point with a lean-to roof to give cover to the watchman.

    A section of the battlements on top of the Watch Tower showing one of the grooves in which a wooden shutter was hung for the protection of crossbowmen.

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    Caernarfon Castle - Queen's Gate

    by kelnsha Updated Nov 21, 2006

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    The Queen's Gate exterior
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    The exterior facade of the Queen's Gate would have originally been approached by a ramp and steps. The elevated position of the gate-passage was dictated by the height of the earlier motte against which the gate is built.

    The back of the Queen's Gate, like other parts of the castle, was never completed. It was intended to have porters' rooms flanking the gate-passage and a hall above at first-floor level.

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  • kelnsha's Profile Photo

    Caernarfon Castle - The Kitchens

    by kelnsha Updated Nov 19, 2006

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    The kitchen area ruins, Caernarfon Castle
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    The slight stone foundations suggest that the castle kitchens were never completed as planned or used as originally intended. The remains include interesting details of water engineering.

    The seatings for copper cauldrons at the west (left) end of the range indicate the planned position of the boiling house. Here, meat would have been boiled and the remaining stock used to make pottage, a soup-like dish that was a staple part of the medieval diet.

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    Caernarfon Llyfrgell Library

    by kelnsha Updated Nov 19, 2006

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    Caernarfon LLyfrgell Library

    There is free internet access at this library.

    Resources:
    -free broadband access to the Internet
    -11 Computers
    -wheelchair access
    -art gallery
    -community room
    -photocopier
    -fax
    -lift

    Opening hours:
    Monday: 9.30am to 7pm
    Tuesday: 9.30am to 7pm
    Wednesday: 9.30am to 1pm
    Thursday: 9.30am to 7pm
    Friday: 9.30am to 7pm
    Saturday: 9.30am to 1pm

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  • kelnsha's Profile Photo

    Caernarfon Castle - Eagle Tower

    by kelnsha Updated Nov 19, 2006

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    Caernarfon Castle - Eagle Tower
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    King Edward's I's most impressive fortress. Stupendously strong, it was built between 1283 and 1301 with polygonal towers and colour-banded masonry modelled on the 5th-century walls of Constantinople.

    The castle was designed as a seat of government rule and a royal palace. Living quarters with glass windows were fitted in the towers, of which the Eagle Tower is the finest, on whose turrets you can spot the weathered eagle from which it gets its name, and where stone helmetd figures were intended to swell the garrison's numbers.

    The greatest of all the castle's towers, with fine apartments on each of the three floors above the basement antechamber.

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Caernarfon Things to Do

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