Conwy Things to Do

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    Conwy RSPB Reserve

    by Myfanwe Written Aug 31, 2009

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    The RSPB Reserve at Conwy is a haven for Wildlife. It is situated on the banks of the Conwy Estuary and has several bird hides overlooking the Wetland areas. While I was there I saw a flock of about 200 Curlew flying around, Oystercatchers, Bar-tailed Godwit and many others. This is an excellent place to go for a walk even if you're not really into birding. The paths and boardwalks take you on a circular route around the reserve. I particularly enjoyed the views of the castle whilst walking back up the estuary path towards the entrance.

    There is an entrance fee of £2.50 for non-members of the RSPB. There is a well equipped shop by the reception and a coffee shop and toilets in the adjacent building.

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    Conwy Mussel Museum

    by Balam Written Aug 28, 2009

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    Musseling in Conwy today is still carried out in the traditional way and at this small Museum in the Mussel purification plant you can see how the mussels are cleaned and purified. Learn some interesting things as Conwy was once one of the most important pearl fisheries in the country. In the early 19th Century over 4 kilos of pearls from Conwy mussels were sent each week to jewellers in London. You can find out whose crown once housed a Conwy pearl and find out how mussels are harvested today. There is a display of old photographs and equipment which has been used by generations of mussel men.
    Conwy mussels are a popular delicacy but the season for gathering Mussels only lasts during the winter months and the fishermen hope that by opening the museum in the purification plant to summer visitors they will be able to supplement their income.

    There is a stall selling Crab lines buckets nets and Bait as well as fresh Mussels, Cockles, Prawns, Whelks at £2.50 per tub and Crab Sticks at £1 per tub.

    Admission Free

    Open Daily 10.30 to 4.30 from Easter to 1st September

    Conwy Mussel Museum Conwy Mussel Museum Cockles
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    Suspension Bridge

    by Balam Updated Aug 28, 2009

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    Thomas Telford's Conwy Suspension Bridge opened in 1826 as part of Telfords improvements to the Bangor-Chester road. Although on nothing like the scale of his suspension bridge across the Menai Strait, it stands beneath the 13th century Conwy Castle and is open to public, along with the Tollkeeper's house.for a charge of £1 to help with the costs of £58,000 per year it takes to maintain it.

    During his life, Thomas Telford built more than 1,000 miles of road, including the main road from London to Holyhead. It was during the construction of this ambitious project that he was invited to build a bridge spanning the Conwy estuary. Before that the only way across was via to small ferry's. Telford's original plan was to build a cast-iron bridge, but he changing his mind he opted on what was then a far more pioneering design.

    The impressive structure is made even more impressive because it stands next to Conwy Castle. For the bridge to be constructed a part of the castle (the sea gate and landing stages) actually had to be demolished during the bridge's construction in order for the suspension cables to be anchored into the rock. Telford matched the bridge's supporting towers with the castle's turrets, a style similar to one of his other famous bridges, the Menai Suspension Bridge in Bangor.

    Toll House and Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge
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    Smallest House

    by Balam Updated Aug 27, 2009

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    Conwy has the smallest house in the United Kingdom, it measures only 3.05m high by 1.8m wide. The house was occupied until 1900 and the last inhabitant was a fisherman who was 6' 3" tall.

    Adults £1

    Opening Hours:
    April - June approx 10.00am - 6.00pm
    July - August approx 10.00 am - 9.00pm
    Sept - October approx 10.00am - 6.00pm
    Closed Good Friday

    The Smallest House Smallest House, Conwy Stove of the Smallest House Wooden bench and Coal store of the Smallest House Bedroom of the Smallest House
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    Walk along the Harbour

    by Balam Updated Aug 10, 2009

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    You do not have to spend a lot of money in Conwy, after the castle, Plas Mawr and Aberconwy House you can buy some fish and chips and then you can just take a walk along the harbour front past the smallest house and back again. Try some mussels from a stall and have a look around the gift shop. The fishing boats make some great photo opportunities and as the sun goes down it could be quite romantic.

    Conwy Conwy Conwy Conwy
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    Plas Mawr

    by uglyscot Updated May 25, 2008

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    This is claimed to be Britain's finest Elizabethan Town House. It belonged to Robert Wynne or Gwynne who had been an influential merchant. He was fond of grandeur and when he had the house built filled it with colour and symbols of grandeur, both new and old -fashioned It was built between 1576 and 1585.
    Not all rooms have been furnished but you can see the Lower Dining Hall, kitchen and pantry, and courtyard on the ground floor. Upstairs are bedrooms and the great hall.
    It is well worth the visit.
    Note especially the ornamental plasterwork in the hall, repainted in its original colours, and the ceilings. He had his initials RW or RG and those of his wife Dorothy [DG] carved everywhere along with his own and the royal coat of arms.

    There is an audio guide available free, and in various rooms audio-visual displays as well.

    There is also a possibility that the attic is haunted. My daughter was told that Robert's first wife fell ill and died giving birth to her second child . Their 3 year old son also became ill and died. Robert Wynne was said to have blamed the doctor and kept him imprisoned until he died.
    Adults £5.10, reduced£4.70; children under 5 free

    A ticket including both the house and Conwy castle is also on sale
    £7 , reduced £6

    Open from 9 am -5 pm 1 Apr- 30 Sept Tuesday to Sunday
    9.30 am -4 pm from 1-31 October
    It is closed on Mondays.

    exterior of  Plas Mawr the kitchen the upper hall the master's bed the dining hall, ground floor
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    14th century Aberconwy House

    by uglyscot Updated May 25, 2008

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    Aberconwy house dates to c 1300, and is the oldest in Conwy , if not in Wales. It is a timbered stone house which belonged to a merchant.
    It is open from 20 March - 2 November except Tuesdays. It is open from 11am-5pm and admission is £3 and £1,50 for children.
    Inside is typical furniture and utensils [pewter plates], as well as paintings.
    The inside walls are timbered and the windows are narrow with diamond shaped panes. Rush mats imitate what would have been strewn rushes.

    Aberconwy House
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    the smallest house in Great Britain

    by uglyscot Updated May 25, 2008

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    This fisherman's cottage is squeezed in between the town wall. The last person to live in it was 6ft 3inches tall. The house itself is 10ft high and 4ft 2in wide.
    Admission fee is £1 , or 50p for children. It opens at 10am. from April to October.

    the smallest house the smallest house,  in context
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    St Mary's church and graveyard

    by uglyscot Updated May 20, 2008

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    The church is tucked away in the middle of Conwy. and is nothing special to look at. It was built on the site of a Cistercian Abbey in 1185. by Llewelyn ap Iorwerth. The door was locked so I couldn't go in, but my main interest was a fenced off grave, although the stone itself cannot be seen. The stone , the brochures claim , was the inspiration for Wordsworth's poem "We are Seven" that haunted me as a young teenager. Though having done a google search and found Wordsworth's own notes on the poem, I now have my doubts,

    The grave of 'We are Seven' a gravestone St mary's bell tower steps to nthe bell tower St Mary's graveyard
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    Lancaster square, Llewellyn statue

    by uglyscot Updated May 20, 2008

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    Lancaster Square is not far from the railway station, and has seats where you can rest- not that it is really necessary as the town is so small you can cover it in 10 minutes, well a bit longer, but not much.
    In the square is a brightly coloured statue of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth . Llewelyn came to power, as they did in those far off days, by grabbing it from his uncle. But, he turned out to be greatest Welsh statesman of the Middle Ages, by bringing much of Wales under his power. Unfortunately he died in 1240 just when there was a chance of an Independent Wales becoming a reality..
    He developed castle building, supported abbeys, and tried to ensure the smooth succession of his son David from his wife Joan, the illegitimate daughter of King John , but was outsmarted by King Henry III.

    Lancaster square with statue Llewelyn
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    Explore Conwy Castle

    by uglyscot Updated May 18, 2008

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    Conwy Castle was built for Edward I. It is one of the finest surviving medieval fortifications. It has two barbicans: The West Barbican and the East Barbican. There are eight tall towers and curtain walls. There is a bow-shaped great hall. The castle is built on a narrow rocky outcrop which offered good defence. The outer ward has the great hall, chambers, kitchen, and a secluded inner ward had private chambers and a chapel in which there is an exhibition on royal chapels. The Great hall is 135 feet [39 metres ] long. The castle was built between 1283 and 1287. For more see travelogue.

    Admission costs £4.70 for an adult , reduced £4.20
    The castle is open from April 1 to October 31 from 9 am to 5 pm.
    and from 1 November to 31 March from 9.30am to 4pm, on Mondays -Saturdays ;Sundays
    from 11am-4pm.
    There is a pay and display parking lot.

    The day we were there the mayor of Conway was visiting the castle in her full regalia.

    The mayor by steps to the great Hall The east Barbican The Great HAll castle tower the eastern gate
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    Telford Suspension Bridge

    by uglyscot Written May 18, 2008

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    The elegant suspension bridge was designed by Thomas Telford. There is also a restored toll house.
    The bridge is 100 metres from the town centre, adjacent to the castle.
    Adults £1 and children 50p Open 20 March - 2 November from 11am to 5pm.

    Telford bridge from the castle
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    walk along the promenade

    by uglyscot Written May 18, 2008

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    There are lovely old fisher houses that are now pretty homes facing the sea with the myriad boats beached or at anchor. On a sunny day it must be wonderful, though when I was there it was overcast most of the time.

    fisher houses boats at Conwy the bay more boats
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    The Smallest House in Britain

    by iwys Updated Apr 29, 2008

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    The smallest house in Britain is in Conwy. It measures just 3.05metres by 1.8 metres. Its last resident was a tall fisherman, but he couldn't stand upright in the tiny rooms so he left. The fact that it doesn't have a bathroom can't have helped either!

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    Bodnant Garden

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 12, 2008

    The industrialist Henry Pochin laid out these gardens in the 1870s. Later, his daughter and son-in-law Lord Aberconway, together with their children, gradually enlarged the gardens. Today, they are among the most beautiful formal gardens in Wales. It's now a National Trust property.

    Bodnant Garden The pond Flower beds The waterfall The woods
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