Conwy Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Conwy

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    Conwy Castle

    by sue_stone Updated May 4, 2006

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    Conwy Castle has a stunning location - sitting on a rocky outcrop, it towers over the town, the blue waters of the River Conwy glistening beside it.

    The castle greets you as you arrive in Conwy, giving a magical feel to the place. It is a real fairy tale castle, with 8 towers on its exterior. The castle was built between 1282-87 and is a must see if you find yourself in this part of Wales.

    We excitedly headed to the castle to take a look, as castles are one of my favourite things! The entrance is just of Castle Square. Buy your ticket and walk along the boardwalk to enter the castle grounds.

    This is not one of those fancy fully restored castles, but a tumbledown place. It's various walkways, towers and narrow passages are a fabulous place to explore and the views over the surrounding area from the towers is excellent.

    The castle is open throughout the year, and it cost us £4.50 each (Apr 06).

    Conwy Castle Conwy Castle Enjoying the view Conwy Castle Conwy Castle
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    Conwy Suspension Bridge

    by sue_stone Written May 4, 2006

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    Conwy Suspension Bridge was one of the first suspension bridges built in the world. It was designed and built by Thomas Telford in 1826.

    The bridge spans the River Conwy, and sits alongside the Conwy Castle. In fact, at first glance the bridge appears to be joined to the castle. Prior to the bridges completion, the only way to cross the river was by ferry.

    These days the suspension bridge is pedestrian only, and there is a large steel bridge right next to it for the traffic. You can take a walk on the bridge and visit the restored tollhouse for a small cost.

    Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge
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    Smallest House in the UK

    by sue_stone Written May 4, 2006

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    Located by the quayside in Conwy is an unusual attraction…the Smallest House in Britain (or so it claims)! This tiny red house is only 3.05m high by 1.8m wide, and is apparently listed in the Guinness Book of Records.

    These days it is a tourist attraction, and at a cost of 75 pence you can pop inside for a very brief look around…well, brief as there isn't much to see as it is so small!! Rumour has it that the last resident was a very tall fisherman that was unable to stand up straight in his own home!

    Smallest House in the UK Smallest House in the UK
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    Conwy Castle

    by Balam Updated Dec 7, 2009

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    Conwy Castle is certainly one of the most impressive castles in Wales and is my favorite, overlooking the Conwy estuary it's 8 towers soar above what is one of the finest examples of medieval walled towns in Europe. Both the castle and it's adjacent town walls were built for King Edward I between 1283 and 1287 and it proved to be the most expensive of the chain of castles (The Iron Fist) that King Edward I had built in order to subjugate the Welsh.

    The layout of the castle had to follow the shape of the rock on which it was constructed and the interior was divided into two separate wards with the outer containing buildings such as The Guard houses, Kitchens and the Great Hall and the inner ward housing the Royal apartments.

    Unfortunatly the castle had started to fall into disrepair within 60 years and some repairs and modifications were made in 1346 by Edward the Black Prince (Father of King Richard II) but no other major work was done to the castle and although it did see some activity during the Civil War (1642 - 1651) but at the end of the war the castle was stripped of saleable materials leaving an empty shell as happened to many castles in this period

    Adult - £4.60, Concession - £4.10, Family - £13.30

    A joint ticket for Conwy Castle and Plas Mawr is available:
    Adult £6.85, Concession £5.85, Family £19.55

    Entry is free for Welsh residents aged 60 and over or 16 and under who have a valid pass.

    Opening times
    01.04.09 - 31.10.09: Monday - Sunday 9.00 - 17.00

    01.11.09 - 31.03.10: Monday - Saturday 9.30 - 16.00, Sunday 11.00 - 16.00

    Entrance Times and Fees Updated 08/12/09

    Conwy Castle Conwy Castle Conwy Castle Conwy Castle Conwy Castle
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    Suspension Bridge

    by Balam Updated Aug 28, 2009

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    Thomas Telford's Conwy Suspension Bridge opened in 1826 as part of Telfords improvements to the Bangor-Chester road. Although on nothing like the scale of his suspension bridge across the Menai Strait, it stands beneath the 13th century Conwy Castle and is open to public, along with the Tollkeeper's house.for a charge of £1 to help with the costs of £58,000 per year it takes to maintain it.

    During his life, Thomas Telford built more than 1,000 miles of road, including the main road from London to Holyhead. It was during the construction of this ambitious project that he was invited to build a bridge spanning the Conwy estuary. Before that the only way across was via to small ferry's. Telford's original plan was to build a cast-iron bridge, but he changing his mind he opted on what was then a far more pioneering design.

    The impressive structure is made even more impressive because it stands next to Conwy Castle. For the bridge to be constructed a part of the castle (the sea gate and landing stages) actually had to be demolished during the bridge's construction in order for the suspension cables to be anchored into the rock. Telford matched the bridge's supporting towers with the castle's turrets, a style similar to one of his other famous bridges, the Menai Suspension Bridge in Bangor.

    Toll House and Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge Conwy Suspension Bridge
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    Plas Mawr

    by Balam Updated Dec 7, 2009

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    Plas Mawr (Great Hall) was built between 1576 and 1585 for the influential Welsh merchant, Robert Wynn. (His tomb is in the Parish Church)

    The tall lime rendered walls of Plas Mawr tower majesticaly over the high street and reflect the status of its builder as does the richly decorated interior. Plas Mawr is an architectural gem and the finest surviving town house of the Elizabethan era in Wales and England.
    Robert Wynn was a remarkable and well travelled courtier (who would have made a great member for VT if only it had been going then)He was a trader who rose to great import amongst the Welsh gentry of the time. The house is especially noted for its ornamental plasterwork which is of an exceptional quality and has been fully restored to its original splendour and has The initials RW and his coat of arms incorporated into the plaster in many places.
    Probably the best example of this is the plaster overmantel in the hall (Picture 5) which has been repainted in its original vivid colours

    Another great feature is the houses furnishings, many of which are original to the house and others are real period furniture from the local area. The furniture has been placed based on an inventory of the contents made in 1665.

    --

    Visitors can take an audio-tour of the house which describes the restoration and the life of the Tudor gentry (not just Wynn's generous entertaining and feasting, but also the work of the servants which underpinned such a lavish lifestyle).

    Adult - £4.95, Concession - £4.60, Family - £14.50

    A joint ticket for Conwy Castle and Plas Mawr is available:
    Adult £6.85, Concession £5.85, Family £19.55

    Entry is free for Welsh residents aged 60 and over or 16 and under who have a valid pass.

    Opening Times:
    01.04.09 - 30.09.09: 9.00 - 17.00 Tuesday to Sunday, closed on Mondays except Bank Holidays

    01.10.09 - 31.10.09: 9.30 - 16.00 Tuesday to Sunday, closed on Mondays except Bank Holidays

    01.11.09 - 31.03.10: Closed

    Opening times and entrance Fees updated 08/12/09

    Plas Mawr Plas Mawr Plas Mawr Plas Mawr Plas Mawr
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    Aberconwy House.

    by Balam Updated Dec 7, 2009

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    This 14th-century merchant’s house is the only medieval merchant’s house to have survived the somewhat turbulent history of this fantastic walled town for over six centuries. It is said to have been built by the same craftsmen that constructed the Castle and is indeed built from the same staone.
    Furnished rooms and an audio-visual presentation show daily life from different periods in its history.

    Entrance is free to members of the National Trust
    £3 to non members

    Aberconwy House Aberconwy House Aberconwy House Aberconwy House
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    The Smallest tip.. I mean House

    by Myfanwe Written Sep 1, 2009

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    Conwy is the proud owner of the Smallest House in Great Britain. It has a fabulous Quayside location and is indeed very, very small. For an admission fee of £1 you can explore every nook and cranny of this house in minutes. It is by far a very interesting (and speedy) experience. You are greeted by a lady adorned in the full Welsh Costume who will let you into the house via a curtain (no room for doors). The downstairs consists of a fireplace and chair and there is a loft which contains a very small bed. It was once occupied by a Fisherman who was 6ft tall who probably kept most of his belongings aboard his boat!

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    Smallest House

    by Balam Updated Aug 27, 2009

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    Conwy has the smallest house in the United Kingdom, it measures only 3.05m high by 1.8m wide. The house was occupied until 1900 and the last inhabitant was a fisherman who was 6' 3" tall.

    Adults £1

    Opening Hours:
    April - June approx 10.00am - 6.00pm
    July - August approx 10.00 am - 9.00pm
    Sept - October approx 10.00am - 6.00pm
    Closed Good Friday

    The Smallest House Smallest House, Conwy Stove of the Smallest House Wooden bench and Coal store of the Smallest House Bedroom of the Smallest House
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    Smallest House in the World!

    by bugalugs Updated Mar 5, 2006

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    Who lives in a house like this??? Well no-one anymore, although a guy called Robert Jones did until 1900! He couldnt even stand upright in it. The house is featured in the Guiness Book of Records. It is 72 inches wide and 122 inches high.
    Apparently you can go inside this one up, one down room in the summer when it is open for visitors. There is a charge of about 50 pence.

    Worlds Smallest House
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    The Castle

    by bugalugs Updated Feb 28, 2006

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    There used to be a cistercian monastary at the mouth of the river/estuary until Edward I took over North Wakes in 1282. He wanted to build a castle and fortify the town so the monks had to move.

    The photograph is taken from the town walls.

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    St Mary's Church

    by bugalugs Written Feb 28, 2006

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    Princes of Wales are buried here. There is also a tomb here of someone called Nicholas Hakes who is supposedly the 41st child of his father and who is also said to have fathered 27 children!

    Buried also here is a survivor of the Battle of Trafalgar a man named Griffith Owen who was on HMS Conqueror under Lord Nelson.

    St Marys
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    Climb the towers of the Castle

    by Myfanwe Updated Sep 1, 2009

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    Conwy Castle is a splendid example of medeival military architecture. It stands on the banks of the River Conwy comandeering a fine vantage point over the land and sea. Conwy Castle was part of the 'Iron Ring' of Castles which were created by King Edward I to quell the Welsh uprisings with the others being at Ruthin, Caernarfon, Beaumaris and Harlech. The Castle and borough were constructed between 1283 and 1287, they were built by a workforce of over 15,000 men under the supervision of Master James of St George, an architect who acted on instructions from the King.

    The Castle as it stands now is looked after by Cadw (Welsh meaning: to keep), who look after and preserve Welsh Historic Monuments. It is a fascinating place to look around & explore, you can climb to the top of the towers to get glorious views of the town, sea and mountains. I especially liked the stonework of the Chapel in the North East tower.

    I would highly recommend a look around the Castle. There are various information boards for you to read as you go around and a very good gift shop near the entrance.

    Conwy Castle Views of the Conwy River from one of the Towers
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    Plas Mawr

    by Myfanwe Written Sep 1, 2009

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    Plas Mawr, (Welsh meaning - Big Mansion) is the finest example of an Elizabethan House in Britain. It was built between 1576 and 1585 for the influential Welsh merchant, Robert Wynn. The lavishly designed interior and ornamental plasterwork is a joy to see, once inside keep a look out for the 'R W' coat of arms - it can be seen many times in a number of different rooms. The rooms are decorated and laid out with furnishings of the Elizabethan era. The Kitchen was one of my favourite rooms, it had a huge stone grate together with a cast iron cooking pots and utensils laid out ready for the preparation of dinner. I also enjoyed the plasterwork and vivid colours on the friezes in the great hall which also had a great fireplace. At the rear of the house you can enjoy the splendour of the Elizabethan garden which has been re-created to portray the plants and herbs which would have been grown by the Wynn family.

    This is definitely another of the highlights of Conwy for me, I thorougly enjoyed looking around and would highly recommend it.

    As Plas Mawr is now in the care of Cadw, you can buy a joint entrance ticket for both the Castle and Plas Mawr as long as you will be visiting them both on the same day. (See website below for details)

    The rear of Plas Mawr from the Garden Preparing for dinner. The Cooking appliance. Robert Wynn Coat of Arms The fireplace in the great hall
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    Town Walls

    by bugalugs Written Feb 26, 2006

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    The old walls that surround the town are accessible to walk round. 22 towers link the walls and they stretch for 3/4 of a mile. There are a few entrances to the walls and we accessed them near the quay. The trouble was I dont like heights and I here I am trying to be as quick as possible to find the next exit so I could get off them!

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