Llanberis Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by MalenaN
  • Things to Do
    by MalenaN
  • Things to Do
    by MalenaN

Best Rated Things to Do in Llanberis

  • Evenith666's Profile Photo

    Mt. Snowdon, Llanberis Path

    by Evenith666 Updated Mar 23, 2009

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    The Llanberis path starts, obviously, at Llanberis, and is considered one of the longer but easier ways to climb Snowdon. The path mirrors the Snowdon Mountain Railway (which also starts at Llanberis). There is a 'Half-Way House' along the path which serves drinks and snacks, but this is not open during the winter months. The last quater of the Llanberis path can be a little daunting, especially if there is Ice on the path, and although it is the easiest way to get to the summit, it is still sometimes impassable, forcing people to turn back only a couple of hundred meters from the summit.

    The Llanberis path doesn't require any real mountain climbing experience or special equipment, just wear sensible clothes and take some common sense with you, and of course a bar of Kendal mint cake! For more information on what to take and what to be aware of when climbing Snowdon, see my tips on the Snowdonia Page.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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    Lake Padarn

    by sandysmith Written Feb 27, 2003

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    lake boating

    Boats can be hire at Lake Padarn - the lake at Llanberis
    For those that like to stay on dry land there is the llanberis lakeside railway - a narrow gauge steam train, giving good views over Lake padarn to Snowdon towering high above the village.
    Open easter to October.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Family Travel

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    up Snowdon

    by margaretvn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Even if you do not walk up to the top of Snowdon do at least walk from the town up to the waterfall. It is a walk of about 20 minutes and although it is steep in places it is worthwhile. The waterfall is lovely and you can see the rail tracks of the train. The waterfall path is well signposted along the main street.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Llanberis Pass

    by margaretvn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This is a beautiful pass in the Snowdon National Park which you go through when going from Llanberis to Betws -y - Coed. There are a few parking areas along the road but they do get busy with people taking photos or starting off hiking.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Llanberis Path

    by Balam Updated Nov 23, 2009

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    Evenith666 at the start of our walk
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    The Llanberis path is the easiest, longest and the most popular of the five well-beaten paths up Snowdon, It is about 5 miles from base to summit and is well graded, it more or less follows the railway track from Llanberis.

    The path starts in Llanberis and from the station of the Mountain railway pass the front and right down a short road to a small square. At the end of this is a gate and cattle grid go through it (don't walk over the cattle grid as it is very slippy, use the Gate) there is an information board here providing details of the walk. Carry on and start the climb up a steep road. Near the top of the road is a great Tea House, perfect for a drink on your way back down.
    shortly after the path turns left through a gate and goes onwards and upwards, it dips under the railway and after an almost level stretch reaches the Halfway house, a little cafe that is open during summer months. There is then a climb up untill the path once again passes under the railway and is a good place to stop for a break before tackling the last stretch and steep climb. the views from here are great as long as your not in cloud.
    The path then goes south and closely follows the railway up to the top which is just near the Station and Visitors centre ( the visitors Centre is only open during the Summer Months)

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Dolbadarn Castle

    by Balam Updated Feb 17, 2010

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    Dolbadarn Castle
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    Dolbadarn Castle at Llanberis dates to the 13th century but sadly only the keep remains in solid condition but it is thought by many to be one of the finest of Wales's ' native-built castles said ro have been Built by the mighty Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (Llywelyn the Great) sometime before 1230.
    The castles history did not die with Llywelyn the Great in 1240 and the castle was in active use for at least another 40 years and was the prison of Owain Goch (Owain ap Gruffydd) by his younger brother, Llywelyn (Llywelyn the Last) during the struggles for control of North Wales during the 1250's.
    Owain spent 20 years here as a prisoner, living on the upper floor of the castle. During the revolt of the Welsh princes against the English King Edward I, Dolbadarn Castle was held by another of Llywelyn's brothers, (Dafydd ap Gruffydd).
    Unfortunately for the princes and for the Welsh the castle fell to the formidable forces led by the Earl of Pembroke and Dolbadarn was seized by the English army 1n 1282. shortly after the castle was abandoned.
    When Owain Glyndwr led the Welsh uprisings around 1400 it is thought that Glyndwr may have used the keep to hold prisoners such as Lord Grey of Ruthin Castle.

    The Castle is free to visit.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Visit the National Slate Museum

    by leics Written Aug 2, 2007

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    Water wheel

    When Dinorwig quarry finally closed in 1969 it was like the Mary Celeste. I remember exploring the buildings, seeing books and papers and mugs and coats left as if the men were about to return......

    Amazingly (given that this is the UK) its value was quickly recognised as part of the Welsh heritage, and a museum was set up in the main quarry buildings. Over the years it has grown and improved, and makes a fascinating visit. There are rooms of machinery, photos, displays, demonstrations of slate-splitting.....even 3 quarrymen's cottages which have been furnished accurately. There's a massive water-wheel, which still turns, and steam engines to pull the finished slate to the port of Y Felinheli.

    Well worth spending a morning or afternoon exploring. And it's free to go in; your car parking fee of 2 GBP allows you to park there all day (there are walks, and children's activities, and the railway too).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Take a little train ride

    by leics Written Aug 2, 2007

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    Huff and puff

    If you like steam trains, then the little train which runs alongside Llyn Peris is a pleasant way to spend some time.

    It is only tiny, originally built to transport slate from the quarry to the port, but they are proper little engines with steam and huffing and puffing. You'll get some excellent views, and the chance to get off and on during the trip.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Trains

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Llanberis Pass Drive

    by sandysmith Written Oct 9, 2002

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    Llanberis Pass

    Llanberis is almost due north of Beddgelert, the two are linked by spectacular mountain passes which are a must to drive through. From Llanberis the pass runs southeast, with a classic mountain road winding its way through the boulder-strewn slopes of Snowdon. Climbers can be seen testing their skills on the fearsome rock slabs (the training ground for the first successful, British, ascent of Everest) which line the pass. Pen-y-Pass, at the road's summit, is the starting point for two popular walks to the top of Snowdon - the Pyg Track and Miners Path - more of which can be seen on my Snowdonia Page.

    drive carefully, its a narrow road and cars squeeze into little lay-bys to avoid the parking charges at the Pen-y-Pass car park or when it gets full.

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  • stevezero's Profile Photo

    National Slate Museum

    by stevezero Updated Nov 30, 2005

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    National Slate Museum, Llanberis
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    The former works of the Dinorwic slate mine, which closed in 1969, now form the National Slate Museum. Set on the banks of Llyn Beris in the Padarn Country Park. The slate was formerly transported by train to the sea, and the railway is now a tourist passenger one, which runs from a station nearby in the summer months.
    Yoou can visit the old workshops, see the giant waterwheel, and see an exhibition of how the slate was split by hand.

    Admission free - what a bargain!

    Opening times -
    Easter–End of October: 10am–5pm, daily
    Beginning of November–Easter: 10am–4pm, closed Saturdays

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • stevezero's Profile Photo

    Snowdon Mountain Railway

    by stevezero Written Nov 30, 2005

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    Snowdon Mountain Railway

    Surely one of the mian reasons to visit Llanberis is the Snowdon Mountain Railway. The railway is rack and pinion and takes you to the summit of Wales' highest mountian, Snowdon. It is the highest railway in the UK.

    Return Fare to the Summit
    Adults - £20.00

    Operates March to November

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Trains
    • Museum Visits

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Snowdon Mountain Railway

    by Balam Updated Feb 17, 2010

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    Snowdon Mountain Railway
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    For those who don't want or can't walk (or Climb) up Snowdon there is always the Option of the train.
    It was in 1869 that a new branch line of the London and North Western Railway opened bringing people from Caernarfon to Llanberis and the foot of Snowdon then the only way to reach the summit was to walk or take a donkey ride, A proposition was then put forward to extend the railway up to the summit but a local landowner (George William Duff Assherton Smith) turned down every proposal as he thought that a railway would spoil the scenery, it was twenty years later that a rival plan to build a railway from Rhyd Ddu station on the other side of the mountain up to the summit brought fears that Llanberis would forever lose its tourist trade and with this in mind Assherton Smith changed his decision allowing his land to be used and so in November 1894 the 'Snowdon Mountain Tramroad and Hotels Co. Ltd' was formed to build the railway.
    In order to ensure that the trains were able to climb the steep and continual gradient of Snowdon the Snowdon Mountain Tramroad and Hotels Co. Ltd travelled to Switzerland to find the best mountain railway technology

    The smooth constant operation when climbing the steep slopes has been achieved by a double racked rail used with a rotating toothed pinion. This pinion is mounted underneath the locomotive guaranteeing that the locomotive does not lose its grip on the track.
    The pinion is the only source of traction for the locomotive with the wheels only supporting the weight of the engine. The main point that is unique to rack railways is that the locomotive always pushes the carriage up the mountain and due to safety reasons it is never coupled to the train. The carriage has its own set of brakes that will bring the carriage to a stop if it is disengaged from the Engine.

    After some construction setbacks due to some very bad weather the first train reached the summit in January of 1896 and the railway was ready to open to the public in the Easter of 1896.

    Prices:

    Llanberis to the Summit. Return £25:00 for Adults and a Single is £16:00
    Children return £16.00 Single £13.00

    Other discounts apply for students and the disabled or for the various stations along the way

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Disabilities
    • Seniors

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Snowdon Mountain Railway

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 14, 2008

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    The rack and pinion train
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    For some spectacular views of the Snowdonia National Park, you can't beat the Snowdon Mountain Railway. This is the only rack and pinion railway in the UK (similar to the Cog Railway in the White Mountains of New Hampshire). It goes to the Summit of Snowdon, which is the highest peak in Wales at 3,560 feet.

    Unfortunately, on the day of my visit, the peak was shrouded in thick clouds. But the views on the way up were tremendous. Maybe you will be luckier.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

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  • kit_mc's Profile Photo

    Fron Haul

    by kit_mc Written Jul 29, 2007

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    1 - 4 Fron Haul
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    In the grounds of the National Slate Museum are 'Numbers 1 to 4 Fron Haul', 4 homes that were transported stone by stone from near Bleannau Ffestiniog, a town further south. The buildings were taken down in 1998, the stones numbers and moved piece by piece to their new site in Llanberis.

    One of the buildings is used as an education room for school groups and has a video playing giving an outline of the project. The other three tiny houses are each done up in a particular era of workers cottage. So No. 2 is in the style of 1861, No.3 has furniture and layout typical of a home in Bethesda during the strike of 1901, and No. 4 is closer to the present, a home in Llanberis in 1969.

    You can go right inside the houses and investigate the various rooms and get a good feel of the layout. Interestingly, each house actually seems to smell different too, perhaps part of the attention to detail contained in this ambitious exhibit. Outside you'll notice how the front and back gardens change from the more utilitarian uses of vegetables to more ornamental patches of flower and grass and how the external decorations progressed over the years.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Gay and Lesbian
    • Museum Visits

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  • stevezero's Profile Photo

    Incline Railway

    by stevezero Written Nov 30, 2005

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    Incline Railway

    At the back of the Slate Museum, the incline railway is being restored. It was used to transport the slate from the hillsides down to the mine buildings. In Victorian times it also transported the well to do passengers of the mine owners on pleasue trips. Would not get away with that these days however due to health and safety.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Trains
    • Historical Travel

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