Llandudno Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by rexvaughan
  • Lord Aberconway's house
    Lord Aberconway's house
    by rexvaughan
  • MOSTYN, Llandudno, North Wales
    MOSTYN, Llandudno, North Wales
    by spidermiss

Most Recent Things to Do in Llandudno

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    Llandudno's Sea Front

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 20, 2014

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    There is nothing more I want to do whenever I visit the seaside. In this case it was that as well as seeing CATS at Venue Cymru! Living in a land locked city where it takes around 2.5 hours train travel to reach the coast I really do appreciate seeing the water whether it's the sea, a bay or an estuary! I enjoyed having a wonder down the promenade after I saw CATS before getting my train back home. I enjoyed the blue sea and blue sky as well as seeing people enjoying themselves.

    Llandudno's Sea Front Little Orme and Llandudno's Sea Front Llandudno Pier and Llandudno's Sea Front Little Orme and Llandudno's Sea Front Seeing the blue sea and blue skies!
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Llandudno Alice in Wonderland Trail

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 17, 2014

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    There are wooden characters from Alice in Wonderland including Alice in Wonderland, Queen of Hearts, the Mad Hatter and White Rabbit are dotted around the town centre. I've managed to spot three of them as shown in the photos below.

    Lewis Caroll, who wrote Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking Glass, spent his childhood holidays in Llandudno with a family who had a daughter called Alice Liddell. It was Alice Liddell who inspired Carroll to write his books.

    Alice In Wondeland Statue The Mad Hatter Statue The White Rabbit Statue
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    MOSTYN

    by spidermiss Updated Jun 22, 2014

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    MOSTYN is a contemporary art gallery housed in a 1901 terracotta facade building in the town centre. It's considered Wales's leading gallery focusing on modern and contemporary art. The gallery was extended in 2010 with its iconic gold spire and form an eclectic mix of old and new exterior and interior space overseen by Dominic Williams.

    There are six galleries which housing seasonal contemporary exhibitions being produced in Wales and internationally. The flexible spaces can house from large scale to small exhibitions which feature a variety of mediums. MOSTYN is involved with development in the communities and at school.

    My friend and I went to visit MOSTYN before we saw CATS at the Venue Cymru. We had a lovely lunch at its cafe before looking at a couple of exhibitions. As well as a cafe there is a great shop which sell works (of all mediums) by local artists along with the usual facilities. Here is a blog about my visit to MOSTYN via this link

    MOSTYN, Llandudno, North Wales MOSTYN, Llandudno, North Wales MOSTYN, Llandudno, North Wales Annie and Dawn at MOSTYN's Cafe We've Got Mail Exhibition at MOSTYN
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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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    Great Orme Neolithic Mines

    by antistar Updated Jan 22, 2014

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    A discovery on the Great Orme in 1987 rocked the world, and sent historians reeling. What they discovered was copper mining on an unprecedented scale: a mine bigger than any other discovered in the world so far. A mine from which copper was exported all over Europe, and people from all over Europe, even as far as Spain and Morocco, had come to the site to mine or trade.

    The mines are colossal. The surface only shows a roughly hewn hole in the ground - little that might spark the imagination. But below the surface the mines go down deep - incredibly deep. It's the equivalent of a 10 or 15 storey building buried right into the ground below your feet. You can explore a couple of levels down, and this will leave you wondering how anyone, let alone people thousands of years before modern drilling and safety equipment, could have dug so much from so far down in the earth.

    They pulled around 200 tons of copper from the earth, with nothing but primitive tools. It started off as groups of private individuals cutting a little from the easily reached material near the surface, but as the copper grew in value, and became harder to reach, the miners were organised into massive teams. When it got a hundred feet below the earth, some miners found it was too inefficient to return to the surface, and so just lived down there. The mine tunnels are quite claustrophobic, and some are so small only a child could have dug them.

    The mines are a great experience, and they even have their own resident historian. Don't overlook the old guy sitting by the hat collection point - he's a mine of information (sorry for the pun). He's more than happy to answer your questions on the mines, and you are sure to have many when you see what these people achieved.

    Great Orme Neolithic Mines, Llandudno Great Orme Neolithic Mines, Llandudno Great Orme Neolithic Mines, Llandudno Great Orme Neolithic Mines, Llandudno

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    Great Orme

    by antistar Updated Jan 22, 2014

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    A hugely important region long before Llandudno became a famous tourist resort, the Great Orme has been active in human history for thousands of years. From early neolithic copper miners, through 13th century Bishoprics, the Great Orme has been making its mark. The town of Llandudno is a late comer and young usurper.

    The Great Orme is a spit of rock shot through with valuable minerals that juts out into the Irish sea north of Llandudno. It's high enough to offer views all the way to Anglesey and the Menai Straits. Even in not so perfect weather you can make out such landmarks as Puffin Island. The rock is a nature reserve topped by a small observation area, and encircled by the Marine Drive.

    If you have time you should go both up and around the rock, but you should do at least one.

    Great Orme, Llandudno Great Orme, Llandudno Great Orme, Llandudno Great Orme, Llandudno Great Orme, Llandudno

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    The Pier

    by antistar Updated Jan 22, 2014

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    Llandudno thrusts its azure blue pier head over 2000 feet into the sea, making it the longest in Wales. The pier draws all the Gothic gaudiness of 19th century India, as if its architects came back from Mysore Palace and said "let's build that - in the sea." It probably looked quite exotic in Victorian times.

    A walk down the pier is a must, though. The pier is quite photogenic, and the views of Llandudno are spectacular. If you can put up with the Roger Miller soundtrack, the candy floss and kiss me quick hats, and the acres of wrinkled, sunburned skin, you'll get to enjoy possibly the best views in the town, all backed by a cool breeze and the smell of greasy sausages.

    Llandudno Pier Llandudno Pierhead Llandudno Pier Guess me Weight, Llandudno Pier Llandudno Pier

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    Top Notch Art Gallery

    by lomi Updated Nov 12, 2013

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    This is a contemporary art gallery, with an ever changing collection. I love the big open spaces and Its massive blocks of woodgrain looking concrete which makes me think I am the Southbank Centre in London and not some sleepy little Welsh town.

    I bought some contemporary pieces of jewelry in the gift shop made by artisans in the UK. Yes and I also skimmed through the small collection of art books and magazines for half an hour without buying a thing!

    The gallery hosts many temporary exhibitions, featuring numerous contemporary modern art.

    I saw the flip flop and petrol can sculptures of Romuald Hazoumé. He also uses striking motifs in his paintings with natural earth pigments, oils and acrylic paints which are reminiscent of the Yourba culture he grew up with in Africa. His themes are from a very different culture I know little about, and it was the 'not knowing' that most intrigued me. I can look at work like this and just get pleasure from the seeing. Yikes I am so intellectual today, I need a coffee.

    Brill Cafe on top floor with daily menu, cappochinios and free wifi to contemplate the hard work of studying modern art.

    History moment you may want to skip, Lady August Mostyn originally founded the gallery to house her personal art collection (which is hopefully hidden away in the basement).

    Flip flop sculpture of Romuald Hazoum��
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    • Women's Travel
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    Victorian Extravaganza in May

    by lomi Updated Nov 12, 2013

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    Go on, you know you want to dress up like a Victorian! Its fancy dress for 3 days every May.

    Re-live the days of old in Llandudno's gorgeous Victorian sea-side town. Steam traction engines, horse drawn carriages, Victorian fun fair, tea dances, live music and bands, parade, magic & puppet shows, vintage car show... and Grand Victorian Ball.

    Even the crazy locals wear Victorian clothes ... so go on enjoy it.

    The whole high street is sealed off to traffic, so plan where to park well in advance.

    coach and horses
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    I love looking at Old Stuff in Llandudno Museum

    by lomi Updated Nov 12, 2013

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    I love old things almost as much as beaches.

    This museum is brimming with stuff and I spent a happy 3 hours here, looking at images of a very different time. In fact way before we all had laptops and tablets.

    One exhibit is a 14,000 year old artwork, possibly the earliest in Wales, I can hardly get my head around that time span. Its on loan from the British Museum and of international interest due to its date.

    At Easter when I visited there was a display of textiles, one showing a black dress once worn by Queen Victoria. Was she really only 4ft 7"? There was also an interactive display of ladies bustles that you could have fun trying on. I smirked at a plasma screen display asking us to consider how every generation has suffered to be fashionable, whether its ruffs, cod pieces, ladies underwear or nipple studs.

    As an artist, I particularly liked the exhibits of Frances Chardon located up stairs, including his artworks and sketchbooks.

    If you go expecting so see a mini version of the British Museum with all its lottery funding you will be disappointed. This is lovely small museum with limited funding, but it is run to a high standard with great care taken over its many rooms of exhibits by the curator and his team of volunteers. And guess what? Its only 2 GBP to get in.Bargain of the week!

    From Easter, Tuesday - Sunday, 10.30am-1pm, 2-5pm; winter Tuesday - Saturday, 1.30-4.30pm.

    Old Underwear
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    How to dance in Happy Valley

    by lomi Updated Nov 12, 2013

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    Take a picnic and include your iPad or other music device.
    Lay out picnic, turn up the volume to a dance tune.
    Pick a partner and dance!

    The old quarry was given to the town by Lord Mostyn to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria. The gardens have been restored as part of the millennium celebrations and are a relaxing place to wander with a picnic, or sit and sunbathe, or dance to your ipad.

    Confession: I danced in Happy Valley Gardens
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    I Mooched around the Great Orme

    by lomi Updated May 29, 2013

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    The Great Orme Country Park is much visited, and the geology, wildlife, archaeology and landscape of the Great Orme (Pen-y-Gogarth) is of such importance that much of the headland has been designated a Special Area of Conservation, a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a Heritage Coast. There are several car parks and miles of public footpaths to explore.

    The Marine Drive is a four mile scenic drive round the base of the Great Orme headland, from Llandudno's North Shore to Llandudno's West Shore. It is a toll road, but the charge is only £2.50 per car and that includes parking on the Orme, including at the summit.

    Beware if the constantly growing herd of over 150 Kashmiri Goats grazing at the side of the Marine Drive.

    About half the Great Orme is farmland. The Great Orme is reported as the northernmost known habitat for several ‘southern’ species of spider including Segestria bavarica. The cliffs are host to colonies of Guillemots, Kittiwakes and Razorbills as well as Gulls, and also Peregrine Falcons, Ravens and Little Owls.

    Endangered! There are several endangered species of butterflies including the Silky Wave, the Grayling and the Silver-studded Blue. Bet you didnt know that!

    The Crescent Bay of Llandudno
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    • Birdwatching
    • Photography

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    Yes Im a beach addict!

    by lomi Updated May 29, 2013

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    'North Shore is not an exciting name for a beautiful stretch of coast near the main shopping district! It is a moon crescent of sand, pebbles and ocean. When I was there last I wandered the beaches, sunbathing, sketching, staring as usual and watched a land artist building a sculpture on the beach.

    I often take my neice to the paddling pool and a cafe which is open in the summer near the Little Orme, at Craig-y-do. Stacks of places to visit in between, especially the North Wales Theatre with interesting things going on.

    My favorite is theVictorian pier near the Grand Hotel and Great Orme walks with its parade of shops. A Cafe bar at the end of the pier and innocent games in the amusement arcade and mini fun fair. Punch and Judy shows and town bands in the summer. Catch a tour buses for a trio around the Orme in those old Leyland coaches with shiny bumpers.

    A long walk on the beach more than makes up for eating guest house Full English breakfasts, doughnuts and pink candyfloss on the pier.

    Crescent of Llandudno Bay North Shore with lifeboat Llandudno Vintage Tour Bus
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    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Water Sports

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    Cable Car

    by antistar Updated Apr 26, 2011

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    Another way up the Great Orme is the Cable Car. This one requires you are made of slightly sterner stuff than the test offered by the tramway. It's the longest cable car system in Britain, and at its highest point reaches over a hundred feet above the ground. The real thrill is the winds that batter the little cars as they crawl up the hillside. They can really swing, even in a mild wind.

    It's totally safe, though. Only 1 death in a hundred years, and that was a suicide. The cable car seems to get shut down at the slightest hint of a breeze, so the battering you get will be within safe limits. Not that you'll care to know this if you suffer vertigo and you see the ground from the side window.

    Great Orme Cable Car, Llandudno Great Orme Cable Car, Llandudno

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    The Promenade

    by antistar Updated Apr 26, 2011

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    What would a trip to the seaside be without a stroll along the promenade? You'll be joined by throngs of similar minded tourists, and be observed by the cold, ruthless eyes of a thousand hungry seagulls. They wait for any opportunity to snatch badly needed calories from your hand or mouth. They'll even try and get food out of your bag. They have no fear.

    The sea breeze is pleasant, and the views are easy on the eye. It's particularly nice late on hot summer nights, when the crowds have gone home, and the retirees are tucked up in bed. The promenade is peaceful then, and the soft light of the street lamps and hotel rooms filters onto the sea and makes it sparkle.

    Llandudno Promenade A ferry arriving, Llandudno Llandudno Promenade Grand Hotel, north end of Llandudno Promenade Llandudno Promenade

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    THE GREAT ORME

    by beannie Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The great orme in llandudno, you can walk up, catch a tram or drive, its so lovely up there and the views are fantastic, there are mines you can go in, cafes, theres a big park at the top for the kids and on the other side there is a ski slope and tobogin and a log cabin to have a meal and drink in, well worth a visit especialy in summer.

    On the western side of the Great Orme well below the Marine Drive and at the end of Llys Helig are the remains, from the 1939-45 war, of the Artillary School that was moved from Shoeburyness on the Essex coast in 1940. Llys Helig is noted for its very large, modern, and distinctive houses and bungalows seen in the following photograph from the marine drive. In the distance is the River Conwy.

    you can visit the mines phone no below

    one side of the mountain of the orme
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    • Skiing and Boarding
    • Hiking and Walking

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Llandudno Things to Do

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