Unique Places in Wales

  • Eglwys y Tabernacl
    Eglwys y Tabernacl
    by spidermiss
  • Cardiff Crown Courts, Cardiff
    Cardiff Crown Courts, Cardiff
    by spidermiss
  • Cardiff Crown Courts, Cardiff
    Cardiff Crown Courts, Cardiff
    by spidermiss

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Wales

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    peace by the sea

    by colinandanne Written Feb 13, 2013

    camping at llanmadoc campsite is nice and safe for kids even if the owner is a bit of welsh dragon. The beach is so close and never ever packed it is a delight, But be warned this site owner can be unfriendly the facilities are basic but the views are great if you can get to the top of the field

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Camping

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    Pentre Ifan Burial Chamber

    by nani80 Updated Feb 2, 2012

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    Pentre Ifan is an impressive, well preserved megalithic site dating back to about 3500 BC. It was originally constructed as a burial chamber. The huge capstone weighs over 16 tons and is 5m off the ground, held on 3 uprights.

    It is located about 6,5 km from Newport (drive along A487 towards Cardigan; after 2,5 km turn right and follow the signs).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Walk to Cadair Idris via Minffordd path

    by nani80 Updated Jan 31, 2012

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    The circular route to Cadair Idris from Minffordd is absolutely worth 5-6 hours hike (not including numerous stops to take photos and enjoy the views).
    The amphitheatre and a lake inside were created by the last ice age, and if the weather is good (which is not often, unfortunately) the views are spectacular. The route is around 10km long, and although quite steep in places, really manageable.
    This walk starts and begins at the Minffordd car park on the main A487 road.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Castell Dinas Bran

    by nani80 Written Dec 16, 2011

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    Little remains of this medieval castle built on the site of an Iron-age fort. Yet, it's location, on a steep hill which overlooks Llangollen, makes it one of the most magical places in Wales. Known as The Crow Castle, it is associated with many myths and legends, and well-worth the short but steep walk up the hill.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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    Valle Crucis Abbey & Eliseg's Pillar

    by nani80 Written Dec 16, 2011

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    Valle Crucis Abbey and the Eliseg's Pillar lie close together in a idylic green valley near Llangollen. The upright stone is all that is left of a stone cross erected in the 9th century in memory of Eliseg, the King of Powys. The pillar gave the name to the whole valley (valle crucis = valley of the cross), as well as to the abbey nearby. The remains of Valle Crucis Abbey will give you a good impression of monks' life centuries ago.
    Both are located just off the A542 north-west of Llangolen.

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    Cymer Abbey & Llanelltyd Bridge

    by nani80 Written Dec 14, 2011

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    Cymer Abbey is a ruined Cistercian abbey north of Dolgellau, The abbey was founded in the 12th century. Next to the abbey stands the old Llanelltyd brigde from the 18th century.

    Located on A470 3 km north-west of Dolgellau.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Mewslade Bay

    by nani80 Written Dec 14, 2011

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    If you love unspoilt beaches with clean watter, the Mewslade Beach (Gower) is a complete gem.

    You can reach it either from Rhossili (around 1h) or from Pitton (some 20minutes).
    I recommend walking from Rhossili towards Worms Head, then taking the cliff path to the left.
    Before reaching Mewslade, you'll have a chance to enjoy a spectacular coast and another lovely sandy beach at Fall Bay.

    Try to visit at low tide.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

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    Manorbier

    by nani80 Written Dec 14, 2011

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    Manorbier is a picturesque village in a stream-carved valley on the south coast of Pembrokeshire. Once was defined as "the most pleasant place in Wales”.
    Visit St James Church from 12th century and Manorbier Castle which overlooks the bay. Take a walk along the sandy beach surrounded by red sandstone cliffs, and visit a neolithic Kings Quoit burial chamber.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Surfing
    • Castles and Palaces

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    King's Quoit Burial Chamber in Manorbier

    by nani80 Written Dec 14, 2011

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    King's Quoit is a a neolithic burial chamber dating from 3000BC, overlooking the picturesque Manorbier Bay.
    It is only a short walk along the cliff path from the Manorbier beach (head south-east from the beach).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Green Bridge of Wales - nature's gem

    by nani80 Written Dec 14, 2011

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    Green Bridge of Wales is a dramatic natural rock arch carved into the cliffs of the Pembrokeshire coast.
    It can be reached by the Pembrokeshire coastal path (approximately 3 miles from Bosherston) or by road through Castlemartin Firing Range.

    The area is open only on non-firing periods so make sure you check when it's open to the public.
    Live firing notices can be viewed here: http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/MicroSite/DIO/OurPublications/DTE/CastlemartinFiringNotice.htm and at the entrances to the range. For further information on live firing times contact 01646 662367.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Birdwatching

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    Squeek Squeek!!

    by Deus_ultima Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Welcome to Porth Oer/Whistling Sands!

    This is up till now my favorite beach in Wales. For some reason, when you walk, the sand squeeks at every footstep!

    Quite odd, really... but it's nice and soft and far away from the crowds of some other beaches that are closer to town.

    You'll find younger children here (babies, toddlers) because it's less crowded and they don't have as many motorised vehicules has the other beaches making it much calmer and relaxed than some of the other beaches in the area.

    You can also hike around the beach quite easily and have your kids (or yourself) pooling for crabs or simply enjoy the view from atop the surrounding hills!

    Love it!
    :)

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beaches
    • Family Travel

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    Rhos on sea

    by muguruki Updated May 10, 2010

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    Watch Glammy play at Colwyn Bay cricket club, Rhos on sea.

    Colwyn Bay play fixtures here throughout the summer but the next county game is on Sunday 8th of August between Glamoorgan and Lancashire and the day after a 4 day game Aug 9-12, 2010 between Glamorgan and Worcestershire

    Match scheduled to begin at 11:00 local time (10:00 GMT)

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    Castle Morgraig

    by Balam Updated Feb 23, 2010

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    Castle Morgraig is located some 800 feet up on Cefn-Onn ridge above Cardiff just behind The Travellers Rest Public House on Caerphilly mountain.

    It has been the subject of much speculation over the years.

    The Castle would have been constructed sometime in the 13th century and was on the border between Welsh Senghennydd and English Glamorgan overlooking Cardiff and guarding what was an important route from the coast over the mountain and into the valleys.
    It was Constructed from a red Marley sandstone but the main question that has puzzled historians over the years since it was discovered in 1895 is Who built it and Why??

    In 1997, The Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments in Wales asked undertook an investigation into the castle and to try and establish the facts.
    Many of the design detail led thought into that it could have been an English Castle of an unusual with five towers, there are the remains of a spiral staircase in one which would be unusual in a Welsh built Castle. Also the presence of carved stones being used as dressing for doorways and windows suggests a English built Castle. The flanking towers at each corner are an obvious 13th century feature that the Welsh had not adopted but the Castles keep and entrance are both have features which suggest Welsh construction.
    However the carved Sutton stone used in construction could only have come from a single quarry near Ogmore, a quarry whose supply was exhausted by the end of the Middle Ages.

    their investigator Jack Spurgeon said that "It's inconceivable that the Welsh lord of Senghennydd would have been able to get Sutton stone in this period for Morgraig" adding that, "it's inconceivable too that Richard de Clare would have allowed him to build a castle looking right down into Cardiff".

    The Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments in Wales concluded that the castle was probably built by Earl Richard de Clare at about 1243-62, with the castle guarding the main road into Cardiff. Many people do not agree with the Royal commission’s findings and believe the Castle to have been built by the native lord of Senghennydd and the scene of a Welsh 'Alamo', where a Welsh rebellion was defeated in 1315.

    The question may never be answered but if you are passing why not call and take a look at the ruins.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    "not in the roll of common men."

    by muguruki Updated Aug 27, 2009

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    In the centre of Corwen in north Wales is a statue of a life size representation of Owain Glyndwr, formerly of this parish. He sits atop his horse, sword in hand, about to cut to ribbons a few score Englishmen.

    The statue has only been in place for a couple of years and was erected to commemorate the 600th anniversary of Glyndwr's crowning as the King of free Wales. Glyndwr as leader of the uprising against English rule may well have not been doing this for the wellbeing of all Welshman as it is believed it was part of a 'cunning plan' to divide up England and Wales into three. Wales and the Marches of England was earmarked as Glyndwr’s patch while Edmund Mortimer would take the south and west of England, and Thomas Percy, earl of Northumberland, would have the midlands and the north as his manor.

    The erection of the statue was delayed as the original plinth took a plunge down a ravine in China; so a much more sensible replacement was found just down the road in a quarry near Pwllelli.

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    Pistyll Rhaeadr

    by sandysmith Updated Jul 13, 2009

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    This waterfall is the highest one in Wales and England. It is set in a deep and peaceful valley carved by ice-age glaciers. Stained with peat the waters cascade 240ft down a mossy cliff, flanked by pines, then thunder down another 50ft into a pond. Note the natural arch as the higher fall goes through this to form the second part of the fall. A footbridge provides memorable views and they can also be seen by climbing a steep rocky path through the trees to the cliff top - takes about 45 mins. Be warned it can be very boggy up there by the river and rocks so wear good shoes.

    Location: in the Berwyn Mountains, just inside Wales, west of Oswestry and Shrewsbury.

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Wales Off The Beaten Path

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