Machynlleth Travel Guide

  • Machynlleth
    by alyf1961
  • Machynlleth
    by Myfanwe
  • Machynlleth
    by Myfanwe

Machynlleth Things to Do

  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    by alyf1961 Updated Oct 31, 2011

    The clock tower was built on the site of the old town hall. The first stone was laid on the 15th July 1874.
    The tower is 78 foot high and was built to celebrate the 21st birthday of Charles Stuart Vane-Tempest, Viscount Castlereagh.
    A grant of £49,700 was awarded by the lottery fund to refurbish the clock tower.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    by Myfanwe Updated Sep 27, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cors Dyfi Reserve is the home of the Dyfi Osprey Project. From April to August you can visit here and be in with a very good chance of seeing an Osprey or two. The Osprey is Wales' rarest bird, there are only two pair in the whole of the Country.

    The Ospreys project is run from a Visitor Centre in the car park of the Cors Dyfi reserve. It is run by friendly volunteers who will tell you all there is to know about Ospreys and when you are likely to see them. You can see live footage of these fantastic birds of prey on large plasma screens in the centre which beams back live video and sound from the nest. There is also a camera set up on the birdfeeders at the back of the centre which show live footage of the more common birds - right up close they look really exotic!!

    A short walk from the visitor centre, down the boardwalk will take you to the Osprey hide which is a hide set up on stilts, positioned especially for looking out for Ospreys. There is a scope set up so you can have a look at the nest site close up & there are information boards on the walls of the hide giving details of latest sitings. I went there in late August & missed the Ospreys by a week :-(( (They migrate to Africa late August early September).

    Apart from the Osprey project, this nature reserve has a wealth of habitats - open water, swamp, bog, wet woodland, scrub and gorse, all supporting their own mix of flora and fauna. There are fantastic boardwalks near the entrance of the reserve if you want to take a short stroll or you can venture further afield if you're feeling energetic. If you go on a sunny day, make sure you keep an eye out for the Common lizard - I saw loads, they like to sunbathe on the edge of the boardwalk but are very shy and run off quickly if you don't approach quietly!

    The Osprey Project Visitor Centre Osprey Bird Hide Board walk Wonderful Scenery at Cors Dyfi Lenny the Lizard posing again!
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    by Myfanwe Written Sep 27, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ynys-hir Nature Reserve lies just off the main road between Aberystwyth and Machynlleth. It covers 427 hectares (1,056 acres), and provides a wide range of habitats which attract flora and fauna galore;

    In spring, the woods are carpeted with bluebells and wood anemones. Speckled wood and green-veined butterflies are common here, and you can see holly blue butterflies in most years, especially in Cae'r Berllan Wood. The oak woodlands have a rich community of breeding birds in spring, including buzzards, pied-flycatchers, wood warblers, redstarts and lesser-spotted woodpeckers.

    There are many freshwater pools and streams where you can see dragonflies and damselflies hunting over the open water any time between May and the end of October. Feeding cormorants, goldeneyes and red-breasted mergansers can be seen from the Domen Las Hide.

    Ynys-Hir is situated right on the Dyfi Estury which provides excellent Saltmarsh habitats which are very important for wild-fowl in winter. In spring and autumn, up to 1,000 curlews and many other waders use the estuary on their migration.

    The reserve also has a small reedbed in Covert Du supports breeding reed, sedge and grasshopper warblers.

    Facts and Figures:

    * Parts of the oakwood date from the 17th Century.
    * About 100 pairs of pied flycatchers nest in special boxes in the woodland.
    * Thirteen species of dragonfly, 26 species of butterfly and 300 species of moth have been recorded here.
    * The reserve is open all year round from 9 am to 9 pm or sunset, whichever is earlier.

    Entrance to the Reserve is free to RSPB members £3 per adult for non-members. You can pick up a map of the Reserve at the Visitor Centre which shows all of the walking trails, the different types of habitat and where the bird hides are situated.

    This is a fantastic place to go for some serious birding or just to get away from the madding crowd.

    Views from the Visitor Centre Looking over the Estury from the Birdhide One of the hides Ynys Hir Visitor Centre
    Related to:
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

Machynlleth Hotels

  • Ynyshir Hall

    Eglwysfach, Machynlleth, Cardiganshire SY20

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Families

  • Wynnstay Hotel

    Maengwyn Street, Machynlleth, SY20 8AE, gb

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Families

  • Ty Derw Country House B&B

    Ty Derw, Dinas Mawddwy, Machynlleth, SY20 9LR, United Kingdom

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Business

  • Brigands Inn

    Mallwyd, Machynlleth, SY20 9HJ, United Kingdom

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Business

  • Ynyshir Hall (Eglwysfach Machynlleth ...

    Eglwysfach Machynlleth SY20 8TA

Machynlleth Off The Beaten Path

  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    by Myfanwe Written Sep 27, 2009

    Llyn Clywedog is a man made reservoir formed by the construction of the Clywedog Dam. The dam was built between 1965-67 to regulate the flow of water in the Severn, both as a protection against flooding of the upper sections of the river during the winter months and also to ensure the maintenance of a minimum flow in the river during the summer.

    The Clywedog dam is the tallest mass concrete dam in Britain, standing fully 236 ft (72m) high. It is 750 ft long, and holds back some 11,000 million gallons of water. This apparently equates to some 550 million baths, or 264 billion glasses of water. The weight of concrete used in the construction of the dam is equal to 7 times the tonnage of the QE2 cruise liner, in all some 200,000 cubic metres; enough to build 28 miles of six lane motorway.

    The lake has a surface area of 615 acres (230 football pitches), is 216 ft deep at its maximum depth and stretches in all a distance of some six miles. At its maximum, it is just 500 yards wide. Some 15 miles of new or improved roads were built around the reservoir at time of construction, along with two new bridges.

    The lake is owned and operated by Severn Trent Water Limited, the fourth largest water service company in the world. In addition to its practical usages, Llyn Clywedog is also a leisure amenity. Severn Trent have established a number of walks, such as the Clywedog Gorge Trail around the Bryn Tail Mine workings and the Llyn Clywedog Scenic Trail, while there are a number of viewing points arranged along the circular drive around the lake that allow you to make the most of the wonderful panoramic views. The National Trail of Glyndwr's Way also passes beneath the dam before pursuing a course along the southern shore of the lake, making this one of its most picturesque stages.

    Llyn Clywedog also provides a perfect habitat for wildlife. Buzzards and Red Kite are now a common sight, and recently there have even been occasional sightings of Ospreys. Mallard are attracted to the lake, while Tawney Owls, Pied Flycatchers have established themselves in the woods bordering the shore. I

    The lake is amply stocked with brown and rainbow trout, the management of which and the fishing rights are the preserve of the Llanidloes Angling Society. Sailing on the lake is run by the Clywedog Sailing Club. Both organisations hold numerous competitions and regattas throughout the year and visitors are always welcome.

    At the viewing area situated above the dam, Severn Trent have created the Look Out, an elevated platform sheltered from the elements, from which you can enjoy a panoramic view of the surrounding country. At the Look Out you will also find the Red Kite Kiosk, where (weather permitting) a welcoming cup of tea and a snack is available on Wednesday through to Sunday from May to to September.

    You will find Llyn Clywedog three miles North West of Llanidloes on the A470.

    Llyn Clywedog
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Birdwatching
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Machynlleth

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

121 travelers online now

Comments

Machynlleth Travel Guide
Map of Machynlleth

View all Machynlleth hotels