Fun things to do in Wales

  • Friary Gardens
    Friary Gardens
    by Myfanwe
  • Clyne Castle
    Clyne Castle
    by Myfanwe
  • Swansea Castle
    Swansea Castle
    by Myfanwe

Most Viewed Things to Do in Wales

  • lomi's Profile Photo

    Best Wales Music Festival

    by lomi Updated Jan 31, 2014

    Festival Number Six: Portmeirion

    I love this place. This festival is geared towards those who like to dance how ever old you are and is set in this odd fantasy village. All sorts of artsy and cultural events around the main music fest.

    The festival is late in the year in September, so not too much competition with other festivals, but in time to catch the tail-end of the warm weather. In 2014 its September 5/6 7/th.

    Price Guide : Adult Weekend Camping: pass £170 & Children (10 years and under) Camping: Free

    Portmeirion Festival
    Related to:
    • Festivals
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Clwyd

    by grayfo Written Jan 24, 2014

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clwyd is a preserved county of Wales that is situated in the north-east and borders the English counties of Cheshire and Shropshire, as well as the Welsh counties of Gwynedd and Powy. The county also borders the River Dee Estuary. Must see attractions include the castles of Caergwrle, Llangollen, Chirk, Denbigh, Ewloe, Flint, Hawarden, Mold, Prestatyn, Rhuddlan and Ruthin. Historical towns include Denbigh, Flint and Mold.

    The county town of Clwyd is Mold.

    June 2013

    See My Travel Page for more information.

    Was this review helpful?

  • lomi's Profile Photo

    Buzz off to the Oldest Food Fair in Wales

    by lomi Written Jan 23, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Conwy Honey Fair in North Wales, is one of Britain’s oldest food festivals and began its life with a local charter given by King Edward 1st, 700 years ago. The proclamation announced that everyone is given the right to sell honey within the walls of the Conwy town, every September 13th, from midnight to midnight, without charge.

    Over a ton of local honey gets sold each year – but there are other produce and crafts available between 9am to 4pm .

    Members of Conwy Bee Keepers Association have organized Conwy’s 700-year old Royal Charter Fairs every year since 1990.

    Jars of Conwy Honey
    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • lomi's Profile Photo

    Go to the National Eisteddfod

    by lomi Updated Jan 22, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The National Eisteddfod of Wales attracts 160,000 visitors from all over the world, every year. You dont have to be Welsh, but you do have to go at least once. Put it in your diary for the first week of August. And if you want to get in for free become a volunteer!

    The Eisteddfod is a travelling festival held in Wales. People travel from all over the globe to attend. The festival is located in north and south Wales alternately.

    Now is the opportunity to learn the Welsh language and to take part in some of those Celtic cultural activities. Or just go along for the fun, especially if you enjoy music, dance, visual arts, and poetry.

    Go on you know you want to! Pronounce Eisteddfod like a local by saying I steadforth, and stick out your tongue for the forth bit.

    In 2014 it will be held in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire. Tickets go on sale in April for the August show. White gowns optional, you could just wear a white hoody instead.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • lomi's Profile Photo

    Don't go to Snowdonia on bank holiday

    by lomi Written Nov 13, 2013

    The highest mountain range in Wales,it is 1085m above sea level. Even so, on a good day it is too crowded to enjoy it. Go on a quite day out of the main holidays. And remember, Its not one mountain but a whole country! So get good driving directions and decide where to park!

    It takes at least 6 hours to climb there and back. So take plenty of essentials, like good walking boots, water and wet weather protection. It rains a lot!

    There are 6 main 'paths'. But path sounds like a well layed out track. When I visited, all I could see was rocks and grassy lumps and lots of shingle.

    The Lanberis path is the 'easiest'. Its tough walking because its mostly uphill. But you can still get lost. If you dont get lost in daylight, you might get lost in the dark. Don't say I havent warned you if you fall down a crevice.

    I broke my ankle just ambling along a 'path' because the ground was so uneven, I tripped and fell and couldn't get up. Fortunately a passer by noticed me screaming and shouting and helped me back to safety.

    Moral of story: go with a crowd who know what they are doing. Its no picnic site.

    Snowdonia on a good day
    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • lomi's Profile Photo

    Mount Everest

    by lomi Written Nov 13, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mount Everest is not in Wales, but was named after Welshman Sir George Everest from Gwernvale, Breconshire.

    At 8848 m (29029 ft), Mt Everest is the highest mountain in the world. Mt Everest is a long way from Wales, located in the Himalayas on the border of Nepal and Tibet (China).

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • lomi's Profile Photo

    Rugby for beginners

    by lomi Updated Nov 13, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Now listen carefully;

    In Wales the sport of rugby comes from the word cnapan or "criapan," and it has medieval beginnings when they used to kick a blown up pigs bladder about a field. Nowadays "It is a thug's game played by gentlemen".

    A rugby team is made up of 15 players: eight forwards, numbered from 1 to 8; and seven backs, numbered from 9 to 15. Depending on the competition, there are up to seven replacements.

    Rugby union players use a distinctive oval shaped ball. It weighs between 383 and 440 grams.

    The four Welsh teams that have shaped Welsh rugby are Cardiff, Newport, Swansea and Llanelli. The Welsh Rugby Union is the governing body for rugby union in Wales. They y produce the national team and the four regional franchises Cardiff Blues, Llanelli Scarlets, Newport Gwent Dragons and the Ospreys from the Neath-Swansea region.

    Dont wear these at home! A rugby ball
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Trains
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Crickhowell

    by himalia11 Updated Oct 6, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crickhowell is a little town in the east of the Brecon Beacons national park. It lies at the river Usk and bit further is a canal – lying much higher than the river. There's not too much to see in Crickhowell besides a few nice houses, the Norman St Edmund's Church and the remains of Crickhowell. But from the hill near those ruins you've a nice view on the countryside with the interesting "table mountain". There are paths up to that a flat topped hill, and if you like hiking you have the Black Mountains closeby. You can do plenty of excursion from there and visit for example the Big Pit and the Blaenavon Ironworks, or Abergavenny which is not far away. We stayed three nights in Crickhowell and found it a nice place in a great landscape, and I had loved to stay longer!

    For more, see my Crickhowell page.

    View from near the ruins Bridge of Crickhowell Crickhowell Castle Crickhowell, High Street Crickhowell
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Caerphilly Castle/ Castell Caerffili

    by himalia11 Written Sep 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Caerphilly Castle is again a mighty castle with huge walls. It's found in the middle of the town, with some artifical lakes around as additional defence. It was built in the 13th century as concentric castle and is the second largest castle in Britain. However I didn't have the impression that it's that large, but I don't know how they calculated the size. Maybe I felt like this because in contrast to many other Welsh castles you couldn't walk on the walls. I was really impressed by those many massive walls, though. You have to pass three gates and two bridges until you are inside, at the Inner Ward. Here's the Great Hall, which really is large and nicely decored. You can climb up on the Inner Eastern Gatehouse and have a look on the castle and the town from above. In the North-West Tower, you can watch a film about the history of the castle which was interesting, a kind of animated film in medieval style. But I wouldn't watch it with children, it partly was a bit bloody, with a beheading and the walls turning red... Also interesting is the leaning tower, which looks like it's falling down every moment!

    Caerphilly Castle Great Hall Inner Court
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Raglan Castle/ Castell Rhaglan

    by himalia11 Written Sep 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Raglan Castle is a ruined castle not far from Abergavenny. It's not so large like the castles we visited in north Wales but still very impressive. Most of the castle was built in the 15th century, pretty late compared to most other castles, but which makes it kind of special. One of the first buildings was the Great Tower which unfortunately got largely destroyed by the parliament during the Civil War. Nevertheless it's possible to climb it, and you have a fantastic view from above, not only on the castle but also on the nice landscape. This tower got fortified some years later, and there's a moat around. A bridge leads into the main castle building with its two courts, separated by the Great Hall. All those little details in the castle were very interesting, like the coat of arms in the hall, the oriel window, all those decorations and above all the Grand Staircase which was restored a few years ago. How great must that castle have looked before it got destroyed!

    Admission (2013): adults 4,50, children/students/seniors 3,40. Free with Cadw Explorer Pass.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Big Pit, a former coal mine

    by himalia11 Written Sep 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Big Pit is a former coal mine which was closed in 1980. Now this site is open for visits and you can take an absolutely impressive underground tour there. They have quite some safety restrictions, for example you are not allowed to take anything that has a battery with you, which even includes modern car keys. Children must be one meter tall at least, and you wear the same equipment that used to be worn by former mines - helmet and helmet lamp, and a 5kg belt with battery and gas mask. A pit cage takes you 90m down, it's the same that used to transport miners and coal. It's a special feeling to walk through those dark tunnels, only lighted by those helmet lamps. It can be slippery and you have to duck your head many times but it's interesting to see the coal faces, the engine house and the pony stables. Yes, they really kept ponys down in the dark! The tours are done by former miners, so they know what they talk about. I only had some problems with the dialect...
    In case you can't make it to the underground tour, you still can get an impression by visiting the "mining galleries". It's an artifical which is wheelchair accessible. First, there's a short introduction film, and then you are led through the galleries by a virtual miner (i.e. on a TV screen) which gives further explanations. That was nicely done, although it cannot keep up with the underground tour!
    Besides, you can visit the old washing rooms and lockers of the minders, and there's an interesting exhibition about the life of the miners.

    Nearby are the Blaenavon Ironworks, but as they already close at 5pm we couldn’t visit that site.

    Open daily from 9:30am until 5pm. Last underground tour at 3:30pm.
    Free admissions. Car parking 2,-.

    Big Pit Machine in the Mining Galleries Bit baths
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Waterfall Country

    by himalia11 Written Sep 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the Brecon Beacons National Park, there's an area that is called Waterfall Country. Near Pontneddfechan, there are plenty of waterfalls, with well-marked hiking paths. Our plan was to walk parts of the Elidir Trail, but as the road to the car-park Pont Melin-fach was blocked we decided to instead walk a bit the Four Falls Trail. That also was nice! We did park our car on a little car park at the small road between Pontneddfechan and Ystradfellte (4km from the main street in Pontnedfechan) and from there it was only a 15 min. walk down to Sgwd Clun-Gwyn. A bit further on is a bridge which we crossed and turned right to reach that Four Falls Trail. There you have another view on Sgwd Clun-Gwyn, just from the other side. We continued the path a bit, but it was too muddy and it would have taken a while to reach the next waterfall, so we returned. Instead we had a look at Sgwd Isaf Clun-Gwyn from above, there was a difficult to find path near the car park to a little viewpoint. I absolutely have to come back to see more of those waterfalls!

    Sgwd Clun-Gwyn Sgwd Isaf Clun-Gwyn Sgwd Clun-Gwyn Sgwd Clun-Gwyn
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Tretower Court and Castle/ Cwrt a Chastell Tretwr

    by himalia11 Written Sep 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tretower Court is a medieval manor house in the Brecon Beacons, near Crickhowell. It dates from the 14th century and used to be a home of the Vaughan family for over 300 years. Next to it are the remains of the Tretower Castle which was built in the 11th century and was a small mound and bailey with timber defences which got replaced in stone in the 12 century. The castle was abandoned sometime after Tretower Court was built and the tower and defences are in ruins now. It's still interesting, and there's much more to see in that manor house. Here you can visit several rooms like kitchen and great hall which have been rebuilt like they may have been around 1470. It was very interesting to stroll through rooms and the decoration of the medial table was so great that you would have liked to sit down eat! There's also a small medieval garden with herbs & flowers and it smelled nice there, but unfortunately it was raining too much to enjoy it for a longer time.

    Admission (2013): adults 4,75, children/students/seniors 3,60.

    Tretower Court - dining table Tretower Castle ruins Tretower Court - kitchen Tretower Court Tretower Court
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Hay-on-Wye, the town of books

    by himalia11 Written Sep 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hay-on-Wye is a little town near the border to England. It's the "town of books", you here find lots of bookshops that sell second-hand and antiquarian books. A great place for book lovers! It's really interesting to stroll through those bookshops, with books piled up on the ground, and in old houses.
    There also is a castle which was built in 1200 and below is a "honesty bookshop" - there are bookshelves in the open air with a box for money.

    Bookshelves at the castle Book shop Hay Castle Butter Market

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Chirk – a castle, an aqueduct and a canal tunnel

    by himalia11 Updated Sep 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chirk is a small town south of Wrexham with several interesting sights:

    First of all, there Chirk Castle. It was built in 1310 and is one of the intact castles, no ruins. You can visit the rooms which are interesting, with lots of old furniture. And of course the gardens are also worth a visit, with lots of flowers and nicely designed.

    Then, there's the Chirk Aqueduct, which was opened in 1801. It's an aqueduct of the Llangollen canal, like the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, only smaller. It's just 70 foot high, and again there's a footpath over the aqueduct.
    And directly next to the aqueduct, the canal passes through a tunnel which is 421m long. When you take one of the narrowboats through the tunnel, you will spend about 12 minutes in the dark...

    For more, please see my Chirk page.

    Chirk Aquaduct Hall in Chirk Castle Chirk Castle, inner court Chirk Castle, garden Chirk Aquaduct
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

Wales Hotels

See all 979 Hotels in Wales

Top Wales Hotels

Llandudno Hotels
252 Reviews - 507 Photos
Cardiff Hotels
1040 Reviews - 3027 Photos
Llangollen Hotels
70 Reviews - 186 Photos
Tenby Hotels
96 Reviews - 249 Photos
Bangor Hotels
90 Reviews - 234 Photos
Criccieth Hotels
16 Reviews - 57 Photos
Newport Hotels
31 Reviews - 65 Photos
Chepstow Hotels
67 Reviews - 206 Photos
Portmeirion Hotels
34 Reviews - 153 Photos
Prestatyn Hotels
16 Reviews - 5 Photos
Llanberis Hotels
78 Reviews - 301 Photos
Beaumaris Hotels
66 Reviews - 136 Photos
Aberystwyth Hotels
14 Reviews - 79 Photos
Swansea Hotels
97 Reviews - 265 Photos
Cardigan Hotels
15 Reviews - 34 Photos

Instant Answers: Wales

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

9 travelers online now

Comments

Wales Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Wales things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Wales sightseeing.
Map of Wales