West Tarbert Travel Guide

  • West Tarbert
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  • Why Red?
    Why Red?
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West Tarbert Things to Do

  • Look up at the upturned boat

    In an area swamped by lochs and sea a lot of the Churches and Cathedrals features their ceilings in the form of an upturned boat. The Church interior surprised me with its modern furniture in the chancel. Here we see a very plain communion table and three seats for the minister and two elders, along with the baptismal font and pulpit.There are...

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  • One of the Few Churches with an open...

    The Parish Church in Tarbert totally dominates the small town. Set on a hilly location it can be seen from all points. Construction began in 1885 and the memorial stone was laid on Saturday 17th. October 1886. The Church was designed by Glasgow Architects J. McKissack and W.G. Rowan. The Church has an imposing square tower which has three floors...

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  • Tarbert Castle

    Tarbet Castle dates back to the thirteenth century, not much is left here but some history and a stange looking ruin. The Castle stood guard over the Anchorage below in the bay and controlled the land linking both Lochs. It became a Royal Castle when King Robert the Bruce had it fortified and extended. At the end of the fifteenth century more...

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  • A Natural Harbour

    The West Loch cuts into the land providing Tarbert with a natural harbour. Its fortunes in fishing have declined over the centuries but it is still a working harbour with boats sailing down Loch Fyne and out into the open sea. Most fishing boats only sail at weekends, but some put to sea every day landing their 'catch' here in the early morning....

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  • A Colourful little Town

    There are a number of Tarberts in Scotland, most are characterised by a narrow strip of land usually where two lochs nearly meet. The Gaelic name is 'Tairbeart' translated as 'draw boat' relating to a story of Magnus Barelegs the Viking King who sailed around the Kintyre Peninsular. He then got his army to drag the longboat across the one mile land...

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  • Tourist Information

    We popped into the Kintyre Information Centre to ask how to get to the Castle. The girl at the centre of operations here had excellent local knowledge of the town and the whole of the Kintyre peninsular. They have free information leaflets on walks and trails with good maps inside. Here you can browse more detailed maps and guide books along with a...

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West Tarbert Restaurants

  • A Touch of France with a Scottish twist

    The sign outside the Bistro had the proud boast - 'Recommended by Nick Nairn TV Chef' and announced Pascal was the French chef here and Jaqui his French partner ran a tight ship where fresh fish was on offer from their locally 'working' boat. Not long after being seated my suspicions were kicking in - One waitress appeared at our table to apologise...

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  • In the Pink

    The owners of the Anchor Hotel describe their restaurant as 'coastal - comfortable and calming' and it was all three. It didn't look that appealing from outside, but inside it was small, intimate and relaxing (this is why I don't have a picture of the food - even taking pictures inside seemed to draw the other diners attention to us) The staff were...

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  • The Best Eating experience in Tarbert

    The Victoria Hotel prides itself as being the only yellow coloured building here in Tarbert in a sea of colour. The restaurant is long and narrow with great views of Tarbert and its lovely harbour. The decor is very much in keeping with the sea with brilliant touches of maritime themes. I did love the table centre piece of the seafood pictured in...

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West Tarbert Nightlife

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    by scottishvisitor Updated Apr 27, 2009

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    Nighlife around this area is in short supply, we usually went into Tarbert for an evening meal and then returned to relax in the cottage for the remainder of the evening. The cottages are in a square formation with a lovely courtyard in the middle. I can imagine summer nights sitting here speaking with fellow guest, but this visit it was still dark early and a wee touch cold to sit out. What better way to spend an evening relaxing on the comfy couches and reviewing your days travel. The log fire burning away, some nibbles, a glass of wine and a lager. We didn't use the television - we didn't want to disturb Cuileann's dreams.

    Courtyard Crackling Logs Reviewing the Pictures Let sleeping dogs lie
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Sailing and Boating

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West Tarbert Transportation

  • Are We There Yet?

    We knew we had a long journey ahead of us when we left home to travel south to Perth then onward to the West. It is tempting to stop in some stunning locations but my Husband is a rather 'A' to 'B' person!! I would need a whole day of stopping and seeing but we had one stop only. We had not long passed Crianlarich, a place visited from the past and...

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  • A Ferry to Where?

    Before we left home when I was planning what to do on this trip I had seen pictures of Otter Ferry and really wanted to see this tiny place. On checking the AA Road map it seemed far too long a road trip to justify going there. I checked the viamichelin web site and the journey time was short. I was confused because according to the map we had to...

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  • West Tarbert Hotels

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West Tarbert Shopping

  • Keep your fuel costs down

    Tesco Express is the little brother of Tesco stores. A lot smaller but selling everything you may need on a self catering holiday. Tarbert did have a small filling station but their price per liter was 8 pence more than Tesco Express. We passed by Lochgilphead many times when travelling north so it was always worth our while to stop of and fuel up....

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  • All kinds of everything

    I found Erra Gael one of the most charming shops both inside and out. The building used to be the old weigh-station house. This little white gem sits alone across from all the colours of the buildings across the street. The shop, like the building, is small inside but contains many gifts which immediately catch your eye and take your interest. I...

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  • Some Fyne Art Work Here

    The shop was spacious and the lighting was just right for viewing their art work of watercolour prints and oils. For no apparent reason they had a 'no photography' rule maybe they think we are all artists and can copy some originals!! As well as the art work they sell a fine range of jewellery, books, maps and souvenirs I only bought two cards...

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West Tarbert Local Customs

  • Timber Export

    Travelling around Argyll you cannot help but notice this area is crammed full of forests with lots of acres planted out with Scots Pine and many other varieties of trees. The forest all belong to the Forestry Commission who provide the public with free access. We passed through Ardrishaig a few times and on one occasion noticed the huge pile of...

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  • Why a Weighbridge?

    I was most surprised to find a weighbridge in tiny Tarbert a place with no heavy traffic. Here it was looking brand new with not even a speck of anything on its shiny surface. The good people of Tarbert like to keep their town scrupulously clean. The weighbridge goes back a long time to the bygone era of the steam ships which travelled from Glasgow...

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West Tarbert What to Pack

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    by scottishvisitor Updated May 2, 2009

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    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Hiking boots or good walking shoes are a must - your feet will thank you at the end of a long day outdoors. I did bring water proof trousers and jacket, thankfully it didn't rain at all. The jacket came in handy to beat the chill which always hits when you are near water. In this region you are always in close proximity to water and rain is usually forecast.

    Miscellaneous: The cottage didn't have a house phone so a mobile phone is essential. You don't always get a signal but emergency number facility is always available. In these parts there is no street lighting in country areas - a torch at night will light your way home and help in the wee small hours if you have to get up and are unsure where the light switches are when eye sight fails due to total darkness. We knew the cottage had a log burning fire with free logs so we brought some matches - the long ones are much better than the short variety - some times fires take a little time to catch especially with big chunks of wood. We did observe our neighbours chopping the logs into small pieces - we didn't pack any wood cutting equipment but on hindsight maybe we should have to ensure a long burning fire.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Travel with Pets

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West Tarbert Off The Beaten Path

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    by scottishvisitor Updated May 15, 2009

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    I had read about the Kilberry Inn it seemed like a very nice place to have an evening meal. We connected to the single track road a little way south of Ardishaig - this proved a big mistake but not a tourist trap. The sign post to the B8024 showed Kilberry a mere twelve miles. Oh what a long and winding road this turned out to be. When we eventually got to Kilberry there was a shop - closed and a Primary School and a scattering of crofts nothing more. Driving a little further we discovered the Kilberry Inn a pleasant looking white building with a red iron roof. The only problem we had with the Inn was that it was not open. Kilberry is located in the district of Knapdale. We travelled the whole coastal route from its sea board side back to the shores of Loch Fyne. I was delighted we had taken this long road to nowhere. As I have mentioned before - Kenny is an A to B person so we kept travelling this oh so lonely road heading back towards Tarbert. Well in the end there was a positive point we finally stopped at Loch Caolisport (thanks to Nick & Chris for the correction here) which was deserted apart from a lone seal happily basking in the evening sunshine and the pattern of Islands decorating the sea.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

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West Tarbert Favorites

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    by scottishvisitor Updated May 2, 2009

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    Favorite thing: The Kintyre Way is a long distance walking route opened in Summer 2006 running the full length of the most scenic Kintyre Peninsula. This walking route, marked by blue posts with the Kintyre Way logo, takes you from Tarbert in the North to Southend in the south and criss crosses from East Coast to West Coast on the Kintyre Peninsular. It is a long walk of 87 miles but the leaflet highlights places to stay overnight. We chose to travel this route by car on the Kintyre Trail - with some pleasant walking beside the Kintyre Way. The mileage was probably longer, we only made it as far south as Campbeltown but we had to travel 'Dublin Back' to Tarbert which made this a longer trip. I do know we took the easy way to see Kintyer's stunning Earth stopping scenery - we had only one day to discover the joys of Kintyre :( How I value time now and the sentiments behind Sir Paul MacCartneys famous song 'Mull of Kintyre'

    Choose Which way Kintyre Way Beach off Kilbrannan Sound The road to Skipness fits both trails Rocky Roads to see along the way
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