Vatican Gardens, Vatican City

4.5 out of 5 stars 13 Reviews

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  • Vatican Gardens
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Vatican Gardens
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Vatican Gardens
    Vatican Gardens
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
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    Vatican Gardens

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Aug 2, 2012

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    The Vatican Gardens are urban gardens and parks which cover more than half of the Vatican territory in the South and Northeast. There are some buildings such as Radio Vatican within the gardens.
    The gardens cover approximately 23 hectares (57 acres) which is most of the Vatican Hill. The highest point is 60 metres (200 ft) above mean sea level. Stone walls bound the area in the North, South and West.

    You can watch my 5 min 07 sec Video Rome Vatican's gardens out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Vatican Gardens Vatican Gardens
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    The Gardens

    by fishandchips Written Oct 1, 2007

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    These are quite big with several spots not accessible to the general public. A quiet ramble around the courtyard is nice, especially on a sunny Roman day. There are a few sculptures including a large Cone!

    Vatican Cone
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    The Gardens

    by MikeAtSea Written Nov 6, 2006

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    The circle of walls built by Leo IV in the mid-ninth century formed the eastern, bulwark of the populus suburb that grew up between the Tiber and St.Peter's. Today it forms part of the Vatican Gardens which are beautifully landscaped and are surrounding the buildings towards the Southern and Eastern part of the Vatican City. There are only certain opening times for visiting those gardens.

    The Vatican Gardens
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  • lotharlerch's Profile Photo

    Not accessible for normal tourists

    by lotharlerch Written Apr 29, 2006

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    It is understandable that the nice but of course rather small Vatican Gardens are off-limits for the normal tourists but through some open windows of the Vatican Museum it is possible to get some impressions of them.

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  • Jenniflower's Profile Photo

    Vatican Gardens

    by Jenniflower Updated Apr 14, 2006

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    We never actually walked in the Vatican gardens, but we could look down on them from the one gallery we were in. Their landscaping is magnificent - obviously no expense spared! There are 23 hectares of beautifully landscaped garden, filled with winding paths, gorgeous flowers, huge trees, sprightly fountains and refreshing pools.

    We wanted to go and view them ourselves, but we ran out of time unfortunately!

    The beautiful gardens of the vatican The beautiful gardens of the vatican The beautiful gardens of the vatican
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    The Gardens Look Beautiful

    by Mikebb Written Apr 2, 2006

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    We did not take the guided tour of the Vatican City Gardens, cost E10, as we did not have enough time. However whilst on the Vatican Museum tour we often saw sections of the gardens through corridor windows.The garden looked beautiful and would be very relaxing on a hot Italian summer day. Our guide said the Pope is often seen in these gardens.

    Garden View from Vatican Museum
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    Sphere in the Sphere

    by keeweechic Updated Feb 27, 2006

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    This is in one of the courtyards at the Vatican. The bronze sculpture is 4m in diameter and was the first piece of modern art to be displayed at the Vatican Museum. It was sculptured by an Italian Arnaldo Pamadoro.

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    The Cortile della Pigna

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 31, 2005

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    The Courtyard of the Pine-Cone takes it's curious name from a huge (4m high) bronze pine-cone dating from the 1st century AD, which started it's way here from Giardini di Iside near the Pantheon. It was then moved to the hall of ancient St Peter's and finally got it's present position in the court of the Vatican Museums during the rein of Pope Julius II. It is covered by a big arch, designed by Bramante.

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    Impress your friends by rotating the Sphere.

    by tophat30 Written Jun 2, 2005

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    You can't miss the Sphere. It's right in the centre of the garden. Most of the tourists think that the sphere ( outer sphere represents the human body and inner sphere represents the human mind ) is fixed but infact it rotates on a pivot. You have to give a certain amount of force to get it going but once it starts to turn it doesn't stop immediately.

    photos1.blogger.com/.../ 640/
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    The postcard is a souvenir in itself

    by sourbugger Updated Feb 6, 2005

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    The Vatican city maintains at least three Post Offices. In St Peter's square one is behind the semicircular colonnade (on the right side as you face St. Peter's basilica), and another is along the orange wall between the colonnade and St. Peter's (on the opposite side), there are further offices inside the Vatican Museums.

    The rate is exactly the same as in Italy (NB it must also be posted in the Vatican for the stamps to work), and you can always wind folks up back home that the Pope individually blesses each letter to ensure it's safe arrival.

    Vatican stamps
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    Cortile della Pigna (Courtyard of the Pinecone)

    by Blatherwick Written Jan 6, 2005

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    Cortile della Pigna (Courtyard of the Pinecone), the uppermost end of Bramante's Belvedere Courtyard. A gigantic bronze pinecone rests on a capital from the baths of Alexander Severus (222-35 AD) flanked by two bronze peacocks (copies of originals now in the Braccio Nuovo) on the stone railing of the Michelangelo-designed balcony.

    The bronze sculpture in the centre is called Sphere Within Sphere (Sfera Con Sfera). It was created by artist Arnaldo Pomodoro in 1990 for the Vatican Museums.

    At the end of the courtyard on the right is the Tower of the Winds, where Queen Christina of Sweden lived briefly after abdicating her throne, before insisting on more comfortable apartments. The sundial inside was used in the 16th century to cast doubt on the Julian calendar.

    Cortile della Pigna (Courtyard of the Pinecone)
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    Vatican Gardens

    by tini58de Updated Mar 19, 2004

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    Today the Vatican Gardens are divided into two areas (as can easily be seen from the top of the dome of St. Peter's) by the remains of the medieval walls which encircled the Vatican before the construction of the surviving 16th-century ramparts. On one side, in a north-north-west direction, is the park of the Villa Pia and the wood above it; on the other side, behind the apse of the Basilica, is the area that was set aside for agricultural cultivation until the foundation of the Vatican City State (1929) and later left green, although today much of it is built up owing to the requirements of this extremely small state.

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    The Swiss Guards of the Vatican

    by GinGinCoo Updated Mar 10, 2004

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    I love watching the Swiss Guards in the Vatican, they look so colorful with their renaissance outfits, puffed sleeves and striped red, blue and yellow knicker-bockers, they stand on either side of the basilica, guarding the gates into Vatican City.

    There are certain rules to follow to be a guard. They must be Roman Catholics, unmarried, between 18 and 25 years of age, and they must also be good-looking (and yes they all are!!! LOL). Officially they are supposed to be over 1.74 meters tall, but nowadays this regulation is not enforced too strictly. Their pay is not very high - the equivalent of just over 1,000 U.S. dollars per month, paid in Swiss francs - but they are given full board and lodging.

    Every year on May 6, anniversary of the Sack of Rome, the Swiss Guards renew their vows of allegiance in the Courtyard of San Damaso inside the Vatican. In a colorful ceremony, new recruits kneel down, raise three fingers of their right hand to symbolize the Trinity and swear to serve the Pope "to the death".

    Jean in front of Swiss Guards in the Vatican
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