Fun things to do in K'aghak' Yerevan

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Most Viewed Things to Do in K'aghak' Yerevan

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    White Bear barried in Yerablur Cemetery

    by RedEaredPanda Written Dec 3, 2004

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    This picture is of a mother of a martyr who attends to the cemetery often and takes care of the flowers and the graves of her son and his friends who died fighting in the war of Nagorno Karabagh in late 80's and early 90's.

    This grave is where karo Qarkedjian, also knowns amongst his fighting friends as "White Bear" is barried. Karo was a native of Fresno, California in the United States who volunteered to help the inhabitants of Nagorno Karabagh in their war for independence. He was shot and killed in 1993 while fighting.

    Also in the cemetery, you can find the grave for Sose Mayrik and Monte, another volunteer from the states who had studied in the University of California, Berkeley.. Same university I received my Bachelor's Degree from.

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    Yerablur Cemetery in Yerevan

    by RedEaredPanda Written Dec 3, 2004

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    The cemetery of Yerablur in Yerevan houses the dead from Nagorno Karabagh war together with Andranik Ozanian, fighter against Turkey in the late 19th centuries and Vazgen Sarkissian, the prime minister who was assassinated in parliament in 1999.

    There are fedayees (soldiers) who have participated in the war in early 1990's on the premisses who can give you a tour and point out some of the most famous heros of the Armenian military personel. I recommend you taking the tour but need a translator as they do not speak english or any other language other than Russian and Armenian.

    To visit this cemetery particularly on one of the traditional Armenian days for visiting graves such as Easter Monday is even more poignant than with most war cemeteries because the war in which they were killed is so recent (1989-1994) and many of the figures tending the graves are the mothers or other close relatives of those who died. Most of the graves carry a picture of the deceased.

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    Statue of David Of Sassoun on Horseback

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Oct 27, 2004

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    In front of the railway station in Yerevan, in the middle of a circle is the very fine equestrain statue of David Of Sassoun mounted on his horse Dzhalali. The Armenians call this statue Sassountsi Davit and all the locals know where it is situated. This statue is another one of fine works of Ervand Kochar.

    The epic stories of David of Sassoun date back to the 10th century though they were not written down until 1873. They recount the fortunes of David's family over four generations, Sassoun symbolizing Armenia in its struggle against Arab domination.

    In the statue David brandishes a sword which is ready to fall on the invaders while water flows from a bowl over the pedestal, symbolizing that when the patience of the people is at an end there will be no mercy for the oppressors. David's crest of honor was a sword of lightning, belt of gold, immortal flying horse and sacred cross.

    This Statue is a must when you visit Yerevan in Armenia.. It is situated conveniently across the railway station in the middle circle. Many tourists pay the statue a visit during their stay in Armenia. It is a very significant piece of Armenian history. There is no fee to visit the statue as it is situated in the street.

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    Inside Erebuni Museum is Worthwhile Visiting

    by RedEaredPanda Written Oct 22, 2004

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    There is a good selection of jewelry ceramics and weapons found inside the museum. Of particular interest is three silver rythons one of which is shaped like a horse, one like a bull's head and one like a man on horseback. The helmet of king Sarduri II is on dispaly together with a large jug, possibly a funerary urn, with bull's heads.

    Please refer to the Travelogue for further pictures of the museum and the ruins.

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    Erebuni Museum and Ruins

    by RedEaredPanda Written Oct 22, 2004

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    Erebuni, on a hilltop in the southern part of the city is the original site of Yerevan. Visitors can see the partially excavated remains of the site of the city together with interesting objects found there which are now housed in a worthwhile museum at the bottom of the hill.

    Erebuni was discovered by chance in 1950 during exploration of Arin Berd Monastery which had later been built on the site. An English speaking guide is available in the museum as well as a booklet giving a brief description in five languages.

    museum is closed on Mondays but open the rest of the week from 10:30am to 4:00pm. There is a cover charge to get into the museum building (somewhere in the neighborhood of US $2.00). There are many many steps leading to the hill top ruins from the museum building one can climb but it's tedious and for adventurous only. The rest of us can get to the ruins by car by driving road next to the museum north and making a left on one of the dirt roads leading to the hill top.

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    Statue of Hovhannes Toumanian by Opera House

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Sep 23, 2004

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    Hovhannes Toumanian is one of Armenia's greatest and well known poets (1869-1923) who has produced many fable and epic poetry. Amongst his famous writings worth noting are

    In the Armenian Mountain
    Armenian Grief
    With My Fatherland
    My Friend Nesso

    and his masterpiece Anoush

    A lot more will be said about Hovhannes Toumanian in my pages in Armenia when we visited his gravesite and museum..

    This Statue of Hovhannes Toumanian is one of four statues situated around the famous Opera House in Yerevan, Armenia... It is a site worth visiting when in Yerevan.

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    The Opera House

    by RedEaredPanda Written Sep 23, 2004

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    The project of Yerevan's Opera House was began in 30's from the plans of famous Armenian city architect Tamanyan, who was the first to lay and plan the foundations of modern Yerevan in 1920's and 30's.

    In 1937 the splendid and grandeur project of Opera House received the "Grande Prix" award of architectural design in an architectural exhibition in Paris. Opera House was by far the greatest achievement of Tamanyan's genius project building in this respect.

    Inside is the Khachaturian Hall, named after world famous renowned composer, Aram Khachaturian. Tickets and schedules for the world class performances can usually be obtained for under $2 at the ticket booth.

    At the back of the Opera House is a statue of the Armenian Composer, Aram Khachaturian (1903-1978). Around the front, the right hand statue is the eponymous Spendiarian while to the left is Hovanes Toumanian, a second of whose poems was the source of the most famous Armenian Opera "Anoush".

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    Republic Square by Night

    by RedEaredPanda Written Aug 16, 2004

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    The Republic Square is absolutely gorgeous by night.. There are many people walking around outside with their families or their loved ones even on weekdays.. Definitely worth visiting at night and enjoying the atmosphere. There is the teletubies entertaining the little kids and other cartoon characters.. You may purchase refreshments or snacks from the vendors around the square and walk around. A big screen television airs music videos..

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    Republic Square at central Yerevan

    by RedEaredPanda Written Aug 16, 2004

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    Visitors to Yerevan are inevitable drawn to the large and imposing REPUBLIC SQUARE. In Soviet times, the square used to be called the Lenin Square. The square is surrounded by different buildings with fine architecture.. An example is the "National History Museum" of 1926 on the northeast side with fountains outside. There are also government buildings, a post office and Hotel Armenia/ Marriot Hotel around the square. A must see for the tourists.. There are people vending snacks and cold drinks around the square and there are some fine restaurants near the square including the Hotel Armenia/ Marriot Hotel's restaurant on the bottom floor.

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    Mother Arising out of the Ashes

    by RedEaredPanda Written Aug 16, 2004

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    By the Genocide Memorial, when one enters from the car park, you will pass by a statue of a mother holding her child titled "Mother Arising out of the Ashes". The statue is in memory of those who perished, survived or escaped the genocide of 1915. It is a replica of the larger statue which in in place at a museum in Los Angeles, California.

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    The Genocide Memorial Part III

    by RedEaredPanda Written Aug 15, 2004

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    The second feature of the genocide memorial is the 44 meters tall stele reaching to the sky and symbolising the survival and spiritual rebirth of the Armenian people. It is riven however by a deep cleft which symbolises the separation of the peoples of western and eastern Armenia while at the same time emphasising the unity of all Armenian people.

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    The Genocide Memorial (Tsitsernakaberd)

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Aug 15, 2004

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    I strongly recommend visiting the genocide memorial and museum for anyone wishing to understand Armenia and its people.
    In 1965, the Armenians throughout the world commemorated the 50th anniversary of the 1915 genocide by the Turks and the lack of any tangible symbol in Armenia itself was the reason the genocide memorial was created in 1967.
    As you approach the memorial from the car park, you will notice the collection of trees, each of which has been planted by a distinguished visitor such as Barbara Cox, an English Congresswoman.
    The monument itself has two parts. One is a 44 meter tall stele reaching to the sky. The other is a ring of 12 large inwardly leaning basalt slabs whose shape is reminiscent of traditional Armenian Khachkars. The 12 Slabs represent the 12 lost provinces of western Armenia.
    Every year on April 24th, people gather at the memorial and place flowers by the eternal burning fire

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    The Genocide Memorial Part II

    by RedEaredPanda Written Aug 15, 2004

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    At the center of the Ring or the circle, but 1.5 meters below, burns the eternal flame. The steps leading down are deliberately steep, thus requiring visitors approaching to bow their heads in reverence as they descend. Every year on April 24th, people gather at the memorial and place flowers by the eternal burning fire. The Armenians will never forget the massacres of their people on April 24th of 1915 by the Turks.

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    The Genocide Memorial Part I

    by RedEaredPanda Written Aug 15, 2004

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    The first of the two parts to the memorial is a ring of 12 large, inwardly leaning basalt slabs whose shape is reminiscent of traditional Armenian Khachkars. The 12 slabs represent the 12 lost provinces of western Armenia and their inward leaning form suggests figures in mourning. At the circle, burns the eternal flame.

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