Unique Places in Armenia

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by RaffiKojian
  • Tatev Monastery
    Tatev Monastery
    by RaffiKojian
  • Row of khachkars
    Row of khachkars
    by RaffiKojian

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Armenia

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Mother church - more than meets the eye...

    by RaffiKojian Written Dec 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Echmiadzin, often called the Mayr Dajar (Mother Church or Temple) in Armenian is the heart of Armenian Christendom. The oldest Christian nation in the world, this is the seat of the Armenian Catholicos, equivalent to the Catholic Pope. The church construction dates to 301, the year Armenia accepted Christianity, but little remains of that structure. It was however built over an earlier pagan fire worshiping pit. That ancient pit remains intact directly under the altar and can sometimes be seen by visitors. Most such pits were destroyed with the ascent of Christianity.

    You can learn much about the Cathedral from other sources. Basically, it's a nice building, the bell tower is very intricately carved. The inside is covered in frescoes. Nice altar, seat for the Catholicos, etc. There is much that is less known, and off the beaten track here however.

    Behind the altar, on the right, is a door to a small museum of some of the churches treasures. These may be gold bible covers studded with gems, or similar staffs of the Catholicos, or beautiful rare ceramics or other relics brought over from churches in Western Armenia, saved from the genocide. In the back room of this small museum is a set of stairs going down. Above the stairs rests the lance that pierced Jesus' side as he was taken to be crucified. At the bottom of the stairs is a door, and if you can convince a priest to let you in, you'll see the pagan fire worshiping pit that is thousands of years old. The priest will likely make it obvious that a donation left at the pit would be most welcome!

    Outside, across the entrance to the cathedral and through an arch is the gate to a closed off area housing the Manoogian Museum. It can be hard to gain access, but the treasures kept here are worth the effort. Massive tapestries, goldsmith masterpieces, ceramics, hand embroidered costumes with gold thread, all compete for your attention and all tell the history of the church. The really fun stuff though is a room full of all the gifts received by Catholicos Vazgen I, who died in 1994. His 29 years, mostly under communism saw countless gifts over the years, and the collection has all kinds of things - from keys to cities around the world, to very interesting handmade arts. A tribute to a man who ran the church during the difficult years of communism, and was loved by many.

    The entire compound of Echmiadzin is landscaped, and has khachkars (carved cross stones) all over. If you pay attention to the plaques and have a map of Armenia with you, you'll be able to see how this diverse collection is possibly the best in the world. Spanning many historic periods, and many styles, you'll even be able to see examples from the largest collection which ever existed - Jugha. These masterpieces from Jugha are all that is left, as the remaining 20,000 were destroyed completely by Soviet and in the past few years Azeri governments.

    Around the town of Echmiadzin - technically named Vagharshapat - are two other noteworthy churches. Both are named for Christian Roman virgins that refused to marry the Armenian King before he had converted to Christianity. Both paid with their lives. The 7th century church of Hripsime is a masterpiece of architecture, and Gayane is an interesting smaller church in town as well.

    So go to Echmiadzin, a must see, but check out more than just the Cathedral - or you'll miss out on the best stuff!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Monastery carved out of mountain - crazy acoustics

    by RaffiKojian Written Dec 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The monastery of Geghard is an absolute must-see in Armenia. Just an hour from Yerevan, you cannot miss the experience of visiting this place. At the end of a canyon, with fortified walls, your entrance will be lined with villagers selling local breads and dried fruit sheets, a small group of musicians, and then the archway through which you enter the monastery grounds.

    The first thing you notice is the main church of Katoghike, with a big cupola over it. This was one of the last structures of the complex to be built, completed in 1215. It is built attached to the mountain. Before reaching it, is the large adjacent building called the gavit. Partially built adjacent to the mountain, partially carved out of it, this room is a masterpiece of medieval architecture. The ceilings are beautifully carved, and in some ways mimic a natural cave. Off from the gavit are two rooms, and one of those leads to a third room. These are all carved from solid mountain. The two attached rooms have beautiful carvings, while the third room has a small natural spring in it, said to have curative powers.

    Next to the gavit, to the LEFT of the buildings are some stairs leading around and up. Near the top is a tunnel maybe 10 steps long, and to your right you'll see another huge church, completely carved from the mountain. There are four massive columns, and some crosses carved into the back wall, with just one hole in the ceiling for light. What makes this chamber stunning are the acoustics. One man singing in the middle of the room sounds like an entire choir in perfect tune! If you can catch a priest during some Gregorian chants, you'll never forget it. Off on the far right corner of the room, in the floor there is a small hole from which you can see one of the lower chambers - a great spot for a photographer to get a great angle/shot.

    On the other side of the churches are another set of stairs leading up to some small prayer rooms. Outside of the complex can be found small structures, prayer rooms, a small bridge and a spring. Wish trees, covered in handkerchiefs can be found near this spring.

    When the monastery was originally built, it was known as Ayrivank - Cave Monastery, but the name changed to Geghard (meaning spear) when the lance that pierced Jesus' side was brought here for safekeeping, before being moved to Echmiadzin.

    You can take a cheap day trip from Yerevan from one of the many companies offering guided tours to Garni/Geghard.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo

    A 2,000 year old Roman Temple in Armenia??

    by RaffiKojian Written Dec 1, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Yep, around the time of Christ, the Armenian King Trdat agreed to go to Rome, where he would accept that Roman Emperor Nero would recrown him. Emperor Nero, in return, gave him treasures, and Roman architects to take back with him to Armenia. The result was this beautiful little masterpiece, on top of a peninsula of land jutting out atop sheer basalt cliffs. The adjacent ruins of the tiled Roman baths, and the foundations of later churches and castles, as well as ruins of massive fortification walls are all there for you to explore. There is a ticket booth, and tours are available.

    This is an obligatory stop, on your obligatory Garni/Geghard tour, to Geghard Monastery.

    In the area, you can also hike over to Havuts Tar Monastery, or if you're feeling very ambitious, spend the entire day hiking from Garni Temple, over to St. Stepanos (Aghjots Vank) Monastery in Khosrov National Preserve.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Haghpat and Sanahin - UNESCO sites

    by RaffiKojian Written Dec 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Up in Lori Marz, along the deep canyon of the Debed River, on opposite cliffs are the Haghpat and Sanahin Monasteries. Built a thousand years ago, these monasteries were a product of an Armenian-Georgian dynasty that ruled during a golden period in Armenian history.

    In a land famous for its monasteries, these two stand out for their beauty, both architectural, and in their natural setting. They're both built of basalt, and both have bell towers, halls, covered areas, storage vessels, stunning khachkars and more for visitors to enjoy. They once were regional centers of learning and to this day you can feel their importance during a visit, and imagine them humming with activity and prayers at all of their churches.

    It is possible to get up to Sanahin Monastery from the bottom of the canyon by car, or, by a cable car built in Soviet times. It is also possible to hike from Sanahin to Haghpat by means of the old footpath down one canyon wall, across the ancient footbridge with the black cats, and then over and up to Haghpat. This will take over a half a day, but will allow you to feel the connection between the monasteries the way it used to be back when they were built. Otherwise you can catch a ride back down to the highway.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Noratus cemetary - largest khachkar collection

    by RaffiKojian Written Dec 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most visitors have never heard of a "Khachkar" before arriving in Armenia, but this word, meaning "cross stone" will be ingrained in their memory after seeing thousands of them scattered across Armenia. This highly developed art form is almost unique to Armenians, who have been carving intricate patterns and designs in stone, surrounding crosses, for well over a thousand years. They've been used to mark tombs, memorials, to honor donations to the church and by those on pilgrimages to mark their passage.

    Travel across Armenia will expose you to many styles and khachkars from many difference epochs of Armenian history, but the collection in Noratus is now the largest in the world.

    Located in the village of Noratus, near the western shore of Lake Sevan, Noratus is just 25 minutes south from the popular Sevanavank Monastery on the peninsula to the north. A day trip to Lake Sevan could easily fit in Sevanavank Monastery, Hayravank Monastery and Noratus Cemetery.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Stunning monastery atop kilometer high cliff!!

    by RaffiKojian Written Dec 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's incredible that many visitors to Armenia never see Tatev Monastery, built in 895 CE. It's a bit off the beaten track, and the road leading to it is rough, but the rewards are extremely worthwhile!

    This stunning, huge monastery complex, with massive fortifications, rises out of the edge of a cliff nearly a kilometer high. The setting in the gorge is amazing - mountains, gorges, plains, a river with a natural land bridge (known as Satan's Bridge) worthy of exploration in its own right.

    Mostly rebuilt after a devastating earthquake knocked parts of it down, the huge Peter and Paul Cathedral has been mostly restored, but the bell tower remains at a fraction of its former height. There is another chapel in the compound, a spring, and many levels of rooms, some quite expansive for lay purposes. Just outside of the compound are more ruins and a mill building with a massive millstone intact.

    An interesting "swinging column" stands in a circle of stones, and is capped by a small cross. Legends say this octahedral column named "Gavazan", built in 904, would tilt at the push of a finger, and return to its previous location.

    Satan's Bridge - the land bridge at the bottom of the canyon is a fun place to explore as well. There is a naturally carbonated spring just on the side of the road crossing the bridge, a couple of spring fed mineral baths (not hot, not cold), and if you climb down the cliff to the river, you'll see the caverns underneath, with stalagmites and stalactites.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo

    Caveman drawings 10,000 feet up...

    by RaffiKojian Written Nov 28, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the top of the mountains near Sisian, there is a peak called Ughtasar. In a bowl of peaks is a mountain valley thousands of meters high, with a small lake, and snow patches which remain year round... there are thousands of large boulders strewn across the valley, many of them covered in petroglphs - caveman drawings. The variety of subjects includes people, animals, dances, hunting and some scenes nobody understands for sure. The feeling of being up there, cut off from the modern world, transports you to the land before time.

    Getting there is tricky. You can only go for a few months a year - July-September, due to the heavy snow cover. If you're there at the right time, you have to find a way to get there. Best is to contact some of the travel agencies in Yerevan, or spend an evening in Sisian looking for a guide who can arrange transport. The ride is straight up the side of the mountain, no roads at all, and takes almost 2 hours. Well worth making the effort to get to see something almost nobody even knows about - and even fewer have been.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RaffiKojian's Profile Photo

    Ancient cave carvings in a spectacular canyon...

    by RaffiKojian Updated Nov 28, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you've ever wanted to feel like a caveman, or maybe like an Aztec or Mayan, spend a night camping in the canyon past Yenokavan Village (near Ijevan). The canyon is breathtaking and pristine, with sheer cliffs, lush forests, a river with rapids, and a few caves. One of them has ancient carvings, in a style found nowhere else in the region, which will remind you much more of the Aztecs and Mayans than anything else you see in Armenia.

    A couple of really nice and easygoing guys have set up a comfortable if basic campground near the river, where you can spend the night, and they'll arrange your food, cook it, guide you in and out, all for a very reasonable price (I think it was around $25 a person a night with food, but I forget exactly. They're flexible on price if you bring your own food, gear, etc). Take a swim while they bbq some food they've brought for you, then have a drink by the campfire when the sun goes down...

    Note: Call to make arrangements ahead of time!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Camping

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Vanadzor

    by MalenaN Written Aug 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vanadzor is a town situated in northern Armenia, in Lori region. It is surrounded by green hills and is built on the banks of Pambak River. Many of the buildings here are built of the pink stone, so common in Armenia. In the outskirts are some big factories, like an ammonia plant. It is a quite big city with about 70 000 inhabitants.

    I haven’t spent much time in Vanadzor. In 2003 I changed buses here, going between Yerevan and Alaverdi, and spent some time at the bus station. In 2006 I stayed a night on my way between Tbilisi and Dilijan. I arrived too late to visit the museum, but walked around, went to a restaurant and an Internet café.

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    Gevorg Chavush Statue and Ararat

    by RedEaredPanda Written Sep 13, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On our way to Khor Virap, we stopped by the statue of Gevorg Chavush, a historic Armenian freedom fighter in the late 1800's. There are many stories in history books of the battles he led and his expertise on the battle grounds. The site where the statue is situated is breath taking.. It is not to be missed when visiting Khor Virap by the road leading to the monestery. The background is of mount Ararat with its to peaks, Sis and Masis currently situated in Turkey. We enjoyed our stop by this statue and the great view of mount Ararat in the background along with Khor Virap on the right hand side.

    Was this review helpful?

  • drtad's Profile Photo

    Sevan Lake: worlds highest one

    by drtad Written Jun 17, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is an emerald of Armenia in 1900 meters above the sea level. A peninsula on which the Sevan monastery was built in 9th century separates big and Little Sevans . The monastery harmonizes perfectly with the fabric of the amazing surroundings. The monastery has been reborn, and a theological seminary has been opened. The road to the church winds past ancient engraved tombstones, called khachkars, resembling an open air museum.
    On a clear and sunny day, the water is a deep turquoise color. Maxim Gorky once said about the waters that the were like a piece of the sky that had descended to the earth among the mountains. The shores are white sand and most beaches are uncrowded. The monastery peninsula is the most popular spot, and is the closest place to visit as well. The water is about 18-22 Celsius in the summer, a very refreshing swim after a hot week in Yerevan. It is a freshwater lake, so you do not have any salt residue after swimming.

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Fishing
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • drtad's Profile Photo

    Sanahin in Allaverdi Mountains

    by drtad Written Jun 8, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the S end of town, a modern double bridge crosses the Debed river and winds up to the E district of Sanahin, with the drafty, delapidated but survivable Debed Hotel on the main square. Beyond the hotel, the road goes straight and then right to the important and richly decorated monastic complex of Sanahin. There is also a cable-car which will take you up from Alaverdi to the village of Sanahin. When you get to the top, walk straight up from the cable car to the town square, turn left till the road enda, turn right heading uphill, and you will soon be close, and may be able to see it. This is about a 15-20 minute walk. Near the bottom of the cable-car is the 12th century pedestrian bridge, with nicely carved cats in it. You can walk up to the top of the canyon to the monastery of Sanahin from this bridge. Also near the bottom of the cable car is the brand new town church, which was completed in 2001

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Cycling
    • Mountain Climbing

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Yerablur Cemetery in Yerevan

    by RedEaredPanda Written Dec 3, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The cemetery of Yerablur in Yerevan houses the dead from Nagorno Karabagh war together with Andranik Ozanian, fighter against Turkey in the late 19th centuries and Vazgen Sarkissian, the prime minister who was assassinated in parliament in 1999.

    There are fedayees (soldiers) who have participated in the war in early 1990's on the premisses who can give you a tour and point out some of the most famous heros of the Armenian military personel. I recommend you taking the tour but need a translator as they do not speak english or any other language other than Russian and Armenian.

    To visit this cemetery particularly on one of the traditional Armenian days for visiting graves such as Easter Monday is even more poignant than with most war cemeteries because the war in which they were killed is so recent (1989-1994) and many of the figures tending the graves are the mothers or other close relatives of those who died. Most of the graves carry a picture of the deceased.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    The Remnant of Former Russia in Armenia

    by RedEaredPanda Written Dec 3, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This picture was taken in the streets of Yerevan, by an enterance of metro station underground.

    You can see the symbol of former communist Russia, the Hammer and Sickle with the letters "CCCP" written on the hammer. Armenia became independent in September of 1991 and no longer ruled by the former Communist Russia.

    I had to take a picture of this when I saw it. I don't quite remember where it was located.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    Rya Taza Village and the Yezidis

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Dec 2, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The road heading north from "Aparan" passed through many villages. Several of those villages are inhabited by Yezidi people. Mostly working as shepherds, they are fire-worshipping Zoroastrians and recognizable (to the Armenians) as having darker skin. The women tend to wear more colorful clothes and a scarf over their heads.

    As we stopped by the village, I got out of the car to take a few pictures.. I looked back and saw Christine out of the car handing out little toys or presents to the children of the village.. The kids were very excited and they were playing around and letting me take pictures of them and their village. It was one of our highlights of our trip to Armenia to meet the Yezidi children..

    To get there, just look for Rya Taza Village on the map and drive there pass the Aparan Village.

    For more photos of Yezidi Children from Rya Taza Village, Please refer to my travelogue Rya Taza Children

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Armenia Hotels

See all 37 Hotels in Armenia

Top Armenia Hotels

Yerevan Hotels
223 Reviews - 867 Photos
Dilijan Hotels
20 Reviews - 86 Photos
Vardenis Hotels
See nearby hotels
Tsaghkadzor Hotels
2 Reviews - 5 Photos
Sevana Lich Hotels
See nearby hotels
Sevan Hotels
20 Reviews - 86 Photos
Nigatun Hotels
See nearby hotels
Gyumri Hotels
5 Reviews - 73 Photos
Geghard Hotels
5 Reviews - 22 Photos
Ashtarak Hotels
6 Reviews - 22 Photos
Argavand Hotels
See nearby hotels
Agarak Hotels
See nearby hotels

Instant Answers: Armenia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

64 travelers online now

Comments

Armenia Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Armenia off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Armenia sightseeing.
Map of Armenia