Baku Transportation

  • Explore Baku on foot
    Explore Baku on foot
    by HORSCHECK
  • Explore Baku on foot
    Explore Baku on foot
    by HORSCHECK
  • On foot: Carpets in the old town
    On foot: Carpets in the old town
    by HORSCHECK

Most Recent Transportation in Baku

  • From Airport to the city centre.

    by us_jb Updated Apr 29, 2007

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    We arrived to Baku early in the morning by Airflot flight, being sure that we’ll be taken to the city without any problems by 20 AZN as it was written in many travel tips on different forums. But alas, we have not found anybody to take us by such price. The lowest price was 40-50$. We were explained that because of triple price increasing in Azerbaijan from new 2007 year for everything (electricity/hotels/petrol/food etc. ), the price for transfer from airport to the city centre was also increased.So, we decided to spend several hours at the airport, waiting for the bus, which begins its work at 7-8 in the morning and goes from the airport to the nearest metro station – Azizbekov. From there you can reach the city centre, going to 28 of May/Sahil/Baksoviet - three central m.st.

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  • Get there, and get around!

    by kensa70 Written Feb 27, 2007

    The easiest way to get to Baku is by air. Even thought not many airlines flies to Baku, there are some. I got there with Aeroflot, through Moscow. Not all that expensive, but there are even more cheap alternatives. One important thing if you go by air. You can get visa, at the airport, that you cannot if you come by bus.

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    To Baku from Tehran (Iran)

    by MalenaN Written Nov 17, 2006

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    My first intension was to apply for the Azeri visa at the Azeri embassy in Tehran, but arriving to Tehran on a Friday and knowing it took about three days to get the visa issued (and not knowing if the embassy was open every day except weekends) I decided to buy a plane ticket from Tehran to Baku, as you can get the visa at the airport, but not at the land border.

    I went to a travel agent in Nejatollahi Street where I bought a ticket with Iran Air for IR 1390000 (about 150 dollars).
    The plane left from the new Imam Khomeini Airport at 13.45. I think it took about 1,5 hours to fly to Baku (or less). Not until I went off the plane in Baku did I take off the scarf, as only one woman had done so in the plane.
    Getting the visa and going through the passport control was easy. I had already filled in two application forms, which I had downloaded from Internet and I also had two passport photos with me.

    To Imam Khomeini Airport in Tehran I took a taxi from Qazvin for IR 150 000. Arriving in Baku I shared taxi with two other people and paid 8 Manat to my hotel. Otherwise the fixed price from the airport was 20 Manat (July 2006).

    View from Maiden's Tower
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    Baku Metro

    by josephescu Updated Sep 16, 2006

    Baku underground is a good way to go around the city, especially if you don't stay in the centre or if you need to get to marshrutkas or bus stations to get in/out Baku.
    A problem is the lack of metro maps, while i found it hard to figure out myself which line the train was going. Plasmas are used for cartoons and advertisements, not for information, but you can always find help asking around.

    Railways station - 28 May and Cafar, depending on destination, 28 May for the centre.
    centre & the old town - between Sahil and Baki Sovieti metro stations
    marshrutkas for Sumqayit and buses for Saki - 20 Januar metro
    marshrutkas for Suraxani & Fire Temple - Nariman Narimanov metro

    baku metro map
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  • josephescu's Profile Photo

    by train from Tbilisi

    by josephescu Written Sep 10, 2006

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    From T'bilisi (17,15) to Baku (9,00 next day) 80 lari/40 euros first class, second class about 50 lari. First class means 2 bed compartments, sealed windows, air con in the morning, but no water in the stinky toilet. The wagons' attendant usually requires some small change "for the sheets".
    The journey includes:
    - 2-3 hours stay at the border
    - no smoking on the corridor
    - receiving food and drinks from friendly local travellers
    - passing through Mad Max type scenery in the afternoon
    - filling in applications in Georgian letters

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    marshrutkas

    by josephescu Updated Sep 10, 2006

    For Sumqayit, buses and marshrutkas leave every 10-20 minutes from a place next to the 20 Januar metro station, 100m down the road.

    For Suraxani, marshrutkas leave from Nariman Narimanov metro station.

    For Seki, there are air con buses all day and night almmost every hour, 6-7 hours ride, 4 new manats, from 20 Januar bus station near the metro one.

    to sumqayit, please....
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  • Ruai's Profile Photo

    Country travel

    by Ruai Written Apr 24, 2006

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    As already mentioned, transport infrastructure outside Baku goes rapidly downhill. Accordingly, if you really want to explore and visit the villages, you'll probably need a 4 wheel drive. Azerbaijan is a great place to brush up your driving skills! There are taxi's and buses to be found in most parts of the country but be prepared to use Russian, Turkish or Azeri as the level of knowledge of other languages is very low.

    Mud, glorious mud :-)
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  • rossbaku's Profile Photo

    Baku Metro: Up There With the Best!

    by rossbaku Written Mar 8, 2006

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    Baku Metro is to be seen to be believed. I've heard many stories about how Moscow Metro is amazing and Baku is definately up there with Moscow.

    To ride the metro, you need to pay only 14 pence and you can ride to as many stations as you wish. Each one with their own little masterpiece. Nizami Station is definately worth a visit, as it contains a mosaic of Nizami, one of Azerbaijan's most famous poets.

    The only thing to remember is watch your belongings, as trains can often be crowded.

    Me in Nizami Metro Station More Nizami Mosaics with Me!
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    Metro

    by Subria Written Feb 22, 2006

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    Most touristic places in the centre of Baku are in walking distance but the Metro is very easy to use. Just buy a coin and take the escalator down to the platform, it is very cheap and there are frequent departures. Like everywhere in the former Soviet Union the stations are huge and very nice decorated.

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    Subway or Taxi

    by AydanMirza Written Aug 29, 2004

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    You can always catch a bus full of sweaty people, but you'd rather not. However, there are two options to take, subway and a taxi. Subways are fast and reliable, and they are a great way to view an old styled subway for those of you who are traveling for the first time. However, the most reliable and fast transportation is catching a taxi, and did I mention quiet a few of them. There will not be a moment or a second where you will not come across seeing a taxi. They are everywhere! And they are cheap! No meters and no price range. One can make up its own price range. For instance, $3 or more. I guarantee you that it is the best transportation available in town.

    A capture of Azerbaijan's old styled subways.
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  • I think the best way (easiest...

    by Jukka_74 Written Aug 26, 2002

    I think the best way (easiest way) to get to Baku is by airplane.
    The best way to see the city is by walking. Taxi driver's rarely speaks english, and they sometimes get lost while driving in the city.

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    I arrived in and left Baki by...

    by maykal Written Aug 26, 2002

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    I arrived in and left Baki by rail. There are nightly trains to Tbilisi in Georgia, taking about 18 hours, depending on the mood of the border guards. Trains are excruciatingly slow, but comfortable and cheap, and because the border is crossed either mid-morning (going to Tbilisi) or early-evening (heading to Baki), you can get a very good nights sleep. Of course, this depends on how much vodka your fellow passengers have drunk! Border guards take a special interest in foreigners, not always in a good sense...they will be after bribes, and failing money, they might ask for 'presents'...be wary of 'official fees' and demand a receipt for any payment. Don't pay anything if the guard lowers the price 'just for you'...obviously this is NOT an official fee, and will most likely go towards cigarettes and alcohol. A good way to get away without paying a bribe is to show them a credit card or some travellers' cheques...don't let on that you have dollars. It is better to make sure that you are not in a compartment all to yourself, as local passengers often stick up for foreigners where bribes are involved...of course it could also work the other way around! If you are alone in a compartment, like I was, don't let the guard close the door on you...my guard made it quite clear that he wanted money or a suitable gift from me, and when I refused, he closed the door...I made a fuss and enough noise to alert the provodnik (train attendant) who came along to see what was going on...the border guard almost immediately gave up on me, shook my hand and left! Another good tactic is to speak at them in a language they don't understand, until they get bored and leave, or to offer them things that won't be useful to them...I offered a bag of dirty underwear, which did not go down well!!! The Azeri guards were rather half-hearted about asking for bribes...one 'No!' was enough. But the Georgian side was much worse. A local passenger told me that the trains are only obliged to stop for two hours at the most, after which time the drivers are free to decide when the train leaves. If you have a difficult guard, try to hold out until the train starts moving, then they will have no choice but to leave, bribe-less. This only applies to those who do have their paperwork in order...don't expect to get away with not paying anything if you don't have the correct visa, but if you are sure your visa is valid, don't be afraid to stand up for yourself.
    For getting around Baki, my favourite method was walking...I walked everywhere, despite the heat and the hazardous driving skills. It is a flat city, so it is a city made to be walked in! However, taxis are cheap, and there is a network of minibuses with their destinations listed on the side...you can stop them and get off them at any point on their route by shouting 'Sakhla burada!'. As for getting to other towns in Azerbaijan, the fastest way is by bus. There are two bus stations, the main one for international buses and destinations around Azerbaijan, and a second, more chaotic bus station for towns on the Aspheron Peninsula. Some of the nearer towns are served by the city minibuses as well. Distances in Azerbaijan aren't huge, but some of the buses are so clapped-out (I swear some of them run on vodka!!) that it can take hours to cross the country...for example, Baki-Zaqatala is an overnight journey (don't expect to sleep though...you will have no leg-room, and just as you drop off, the bus driver will decide to take a cigarette break, and everyone will make a lot of noise getting off to join him!), and Baki-Quba is four hours.

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  • The best way to get to Baku is...

    by dcmontgo Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    The best way to get to Baku is by air. I flew round trip from the US for about $1100.00. KLM northwest used to have a non stop flight to Amsterdam (great airport) and then there is a non stop to Baku.
    Probably the best way to get around is walking. I took cabs late at night, but be forwarned, pedestrians do not have the right of way in Baku, drivers do. I avoided buses and the subway (although I am told this is pretty safe).

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Comments (1)

  • Sep 6, 2013 at 8:59 PM

    It is a very neat place. Take metro. I would go to the old town and just get lost in it. The national flag square is a must see and there are MANY great view points. so parts of the town are horrible and you can't smile to anyone or people will think you have a brain disease.

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